By on February 24, 2015

The Fisker Karma of Justin Douchebag Bieber

If you were hoping to pick up a new Fisker Karma, not so fast. The PHEV won’t be out until mid-2016, and it won’t be a Fisker, either.

Reuters reports parent company Wanxiang Group, which bought Fisker at a bankruptcy auction last year, will drop the Fisker name when the Karma hits the showroom, whose brand will now be called Elux.

As for the delay, Wanxiang is looking for a production site to build the PHEV, sources stating that it won’t be assembled in Finland, where the original Karmas rolled off the line. Pricing is expected to begin at $135,000, 20 percent higher than the $116,000 for the original top model before production ceased in 2012.

The Elux Karma’s looks are expected to to rely heavily on Henrik Fisker’s original design for the PHEV, with Wanxiang said to be investing “millions” into updating the technology to bring the car up to par with similar vehicles that have emerged over the years.

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18 Comments on “Fisker Karma To Return Mid-2016 Under Elux Brand...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I smell a DMC DeLorean on the way

    • 0 avatar

      Not sure if you drove the Karma, but the Karma actually had an interior befitting a “luxury” car – unlike the $135,000 P85D.

      The only real problem was interior space. If they license the TESLA platform or build their own – better, this car – with it’s range increasing tech – would be more practical than a pure EV.

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      “I smell a DMC DeLorean on the way”. Maybe, we’ll have to wait and see.

      Certainly, the new owner has the horsepower. Wanxiang Group is billed as China’s largest auto parts maker – $16 billion in sales, (including $2.5 billion in North America), $1.3 billion in profit. They also bought A123, so they have whatever battery technology came with that.

      Whether they’ll succeed in electric cars remains to be seen, but if they fail it won’t be for lack of resources.

  • avatar
    redav

    No, thank you.

    I hope one of the technology updates they add is fire prevention. People joked about the Volt being a fire hazard, but this thing was worse in every way.

  • avatar

    Do I smell Saab Revisited? The Karma costed 6 times more to develop and make than Fisker was able to fetch for. That makes it a helluva challenge to make any money from the car that is basically already outdated.

  • avatar
    harshciygar

    This is just such a terrible idea all the way around.

    Yes, the Fisker Karma is widely agreed to be a good-looking car, but that’s where the positive statements end.

    Who in their right mind, besides an avid car collector, is going to pay $135,000 for a car with 7-year old technology (at best) and more baggage than than an airport tractor? Let’s recall that the Fisker Karma could go just 32 miles per charge, after which the gas generator guzzled fuel at a rate of 20 MPG.

    So less EV range than a Chevy Volt, a higher MSRP than a Tesla P85D, and worse fuel economy than a Ford Mustang GT.

    If I were in charge of Wanxiang, I would have chucked the Karma into the scrap heap and tried to start fresh with whatever these is to the Atlantic (the second Fisker vehicle).

    I am a huge green car fan. I think Tesla is awesome, I love the Chevy Volt, and if I had the money I’d probably own a pair of BMW i8s.

    But if you gave me a Fisker (or Elux, I guess) Karma, I’d sell it for parts…because that’s all its really worth to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Landcrusher

      Why would you assume no update on tech?

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      “if you gave me a Fisker (or Elux, I guess) Karma, I’d sell it for parts…because that’s all its really worth to me.”

      If you gave me a Karma, I’d sell the thing whole, because I’d get more money from it that way. (I also wouldn’t park it in my garage while waiting for it to sell. http://autoweek.com/article/car-news/official-claims-fisker-karma-blame-texas-house-fire-update-statement-fisker-karma )

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It might be a good idea if they made it a regular ICE car instead. Then they could cheaply bring it up to date, and maybe not have to ruin the good looks.

    Being up close to one of these, you realize how massive they are, and truly carry a lot of presence wherever they are. Even at a car show surrounded by race cars and Lambos, people were all over the Karma instead.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    That pic was Justin Beieber’s ride – only know that because he was in some incident in LA while driving it and the story noted it was a chrome covered Fisker.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    The Fisker is a lesson in why a car built without a designer is better than a car built without an engineer. It was giant on the outside, but tiny on the inside. It’s reason for existence was a hybrid system that delivered indifferent energy consumption. The looks dropped the jaws of goobers, but they compromised every utilitarian aspect of the car. Bob Lutz wanted to recycle the design with conventional power, which is conclusive proof that Bob Lutz is the most overrated person in the auto industry, perhaps even more so than the guy that changed BMW’s meaning to Bowel Movements on Wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      …Bob Lutz wanted to recycle the design with conventional power, which is conclusive proof that Bob Lutz is the most overrated person in the auto industry, perhaps even more so than the guy that changed BMW’s meaning to Bowel Movements on Wheels…

      I find it utterly hysterical that you call Bob Lutz, the guy who helped give the world the original and beloved 3-series, overrated, while bashing BMWs transformation into a boring brand, in part because BMW leadership has completely screwed up the heritage of the original 3-series.

      Lutz’s automotive resume includes the first BMW 3-series, the first Ford Explorer, and the Ford Sierra in Europe. Lets add in Zeta platform (Camaro sales have topped the others despite all the haterade). Yup – a horrid resume.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        Bob Lutz is also great at taking all the credit for success and rejecting all the blame for failures. But all of that is a misdirect. The question is whether taking the Karma (virtually as-is) & dropping in a V8 is a good idea. IMO, the car is so poorly executed that his plan isn’t a good one.

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