By on February 10, 2015

2015 Ford Escape Titanium AWD redAfter only one brief stint in last week’s 2015 Ford Escape tester, I was already angry with this heavily optioned Titanium AWD specimen.

The anger had nothing to do with our first drive to the other side of Halifax. And I wasn’t even in the Escape, let alone driving it, when my resentment blossomed. I was shovelling our driveway during a lull in the blizzard that left New York in peace, hammered Boston, and slathered Nova Scotia’s capital with ice after a few inches of snow fell. With four vehicles jammed into our small driveway to avoid the on-street winter parking ban, the Escape’s tailgate insisted on opening of its own accord with frustrating frequency.


• USD As-Tested Price: $38,075

• Horsepower: 231 @ 5500 rpm

• Torque: 270 lb-ft @ 3000 rpm

• Observed Fuel Economy: 19 mpg


Armful of groceries? Yes, hands-free tailgate opening might then be useful, if you can maintain your balance while holding the grocery load in your right hand, perching the 15-month-old child on your left hip, and doing the jitterbug under the rear bumper.

But when you’re engaged in clearing a driveway of snow and a tailgate opens again and again and again… and again, allowing a large amount of blowing snow into the car, a shovel-activated tailgate becomes the worst bit of kit ever fitted to a modern car. As memory recalls, when a waving foot called upon the hands-free tailgate to open in our Ford C-Max test car two winters ago, it typically refused. Now, when I’m shovelling in a winter storm with keys to multiple cars in my pocket, the Escape’s tailgate becomes overzealous. What must the neighbours think?

2015 Ford Escape Titanium AWD red rearThankfully, during the week we spent with a 2015 Escape supplied to us by Ford Canada, nothing else spawned such irritability.

The Escape, now in the third model year of its second-generation, is not without lingering faults. MyFordTouch doesn’t really bother me, but needing to reach and turn my wrist into a Spiderman-like shape to use the lower portion of the screen isn’t cool. The upgraded Sony stereo never impressed. A number of interior bits, including the “leather-wrapped” steering wheel and the column-mounted stalks, are downmarket items appropriate for cars in another price spectrum, as are the levels of noise and vibration which make their way into the cabin. The defroster is painfully slow. 240 horsepower (231 on regular fuel) doesn’t feel as special as you thought 240 horsepower would feel in a small SUV because the horses are saddled with nearly 3800 pounds. Real-world fuel efficiency measured a disheartening 19 miles per gallon, hindered by the freshness of our Escape which travelled from the factory to our door. (The Escape is rated at 21 mpg in the city; 28 on the highway.) Worst among the Escape’s letdowns, overall interior space doesn’t come close to matching the Honda CR-V in which we sprawled earlier in January.

But a week of driving the 2015 Escape, with its torquey 2.0L turbocharged four-cylinder and Euro Ford dynamics, made it easy to see why this is consistently America’s second-best-selling utility vehicle. To actually drive the Escape – not just to reside in it, but to engage yourself in the process – is to realize that pleasing on-road behaviour can be found in a high-riding crossover, even one that’s not made by a premium brand.

2015 Ford Escape Titanium AWD front boatThe ride/handling balance is wonderfully fine-tuned. The suspension, even on 19-inch wheels, masks the impact of harsh road imperfections while remaining sufficiently communicative for the driver to feel confident on a twisty road. It’s more nimble and tossable than the CR-V, but its hefty curb weight holds the Escape back from the eager feel of the Mazda CX-5, the last version of which we tested tipped the scales with 233 fewer pounds than this Ford. Steering feel is mostly absent, as it is in almost every new car on sale today, but the Escape’s rack is quick and consistent. Braking would be aided by a slightly more progressive pedal, and the 6-speed automatic could stand to sacrifice some of its smooth slushiness for more rapid shifts.

The Ford still ranks among the keen driver’s best choices in the small SUV/crossover category, even if the EcoBoost 2.0L doesn’t turn the small Escape into a pocket rocket.

At $38,075 as-tested (Titanium AWD Escapes start at $33,085), it’s also among the pricier candidates, though our example was certainly laden with tech gear. Ford’s Active Park Assist needs to work perfectly without fail, and it always has in my hands, or rather, free from my hands. Blind spot monitoring, cross traffic alert, proximity access, navigation, panoramic sunroof: it’s all here. The problem with an Escape that’s this loaded is the broad range of SUVs and crossovers available for the same money, many of which will suffer from an equipment standpoint but will more than make up for their poorer spec with extra usable space.

2015 Ford Escape Titanium interiorBut how many of them will drive more sweetly? If the space is sufficient for you – and it clearly is acceptable to hundreds of thousands of buyers each year – then the knowledge that other small SUVs offer more space for people and cargo is not terribly pertinent.

In that case, the Escape 2.0L EcoBoost is a charming device, especially if it possesses a lower level of equipment that wouldn’t cause it to be compared with its upmarket sibling, the Lincoln MKC. Especially if its tailgate remains firmly secured in the midst of a January nor’easter.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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165 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Ford Escape Titanium AWD...”


  • avatar

    The Escape is brilliantly-engineered, and a joy to drive, even with the volume 1.6T engine. It also features excellent craftsmanship and materials quality versus most of its competitors. But I just can’t get over the busy styling…

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      Yeah, I can’t agree enough. Great specs, should be right in the sweet spot (and for lots of people it is) but the design is… busy because of angles and lines.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      “It also features excellent craftsmanship and materials quality versus most of its competitors.”

      One of us is delusional. This has an interior, with textures, materials and trim that are on about par with a Focus.

      It’s insanely priced – no matter how many stupid options it has – at anything at over 28k (it’s not going to be anywhere near as reliable/durable a vehicle as a 23k CX-5 or CRV).

      Then again, you love the Cadillac ATS, which is now receiving 9k off MSRP, between manufacturer and dealer incentives, and the Cadillac CTS, which is receiving 13k off MSRP, between manufacturer and dealer incentives, in just the latest attempt to desperately try to sell some – any – of those failed vehicles (you’d pay full MSRP).

      “The failure of the ATS and CTS to hit their targets is costing GM. To kindle demand, Cadillac has offered subsidized leases, discounted financing and rebates. Consumers are being given $4,000 on the 2014 ATS and $6,000 on the 2014 CTS. But some dealers are getting additional subsidies from Cadillac — up to $5,000 more on the 2014 ATS and up to $7,000 more on the 2014 CTS — to help clear out unsold cars.”

      http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/02/10/us-gm-cadillac-exclusive-idUSKBN0LE0D220150210

      You’d be the last person to take up Cadillac on a 53k MSRP 2014 CTS for 28k, because as you’d put it, current Cadillacs are worth their ask:

      http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/f15/cts-escalade-help-boost-cadillac-u-s-sales-195266/

      Get your $53,100 MSRP CTS Sedan 2.0L Luxury Collection for….wait for it…

      …$28,710 !!!

      Building brand value, great product & efficiently pricing their vehicles; the Cadillac way.

      http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/f15/cts-escalade-help-boost-cadillac-u-s-sales-195266/#post4715346

      Go Johan de Zohan! Go Melody CT-Lee!

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        One of us is delusional.

        My money is on it being you.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        Local Ford dealers are taking 5 to 7k off Escapes. It puts in the $27-29k range for a Titanium. Those prices give it a different prospective compared to the granny like CR-V. A comparable spec’d out CR-V is 32k. To me the only thing close to the Escape with the 2.0 EB is the Forester XT which is in the low 30’s.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Then Ford is among the most disingenuous in “Window Stickering.”

          It’s one thing to sell 50k MSRP vehicles, such as full size pickups, for routine 12k or even 14k “discounts” ‘off MSRP’ (“You’re getting an awesome deal, Mr. Smith!”), but another to jerk 9k off a 38k MSRP Focus, Escape Edition.

          Retail car sale games are so juvenile.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy

        @DW: Your off-topic Cadillac rants are about as welcome as a post starting with the words “My sister makes $50/hour with her computer…”

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          You can’t click on a Ford Raptor article and not find him bashing Cadillac.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Whether you welcome it, it’s appropriate given how stalwart a supporter of Cadillac’s pricing Kyree has been, given how I absolutely nailed my prediction of ATS/CTS failure & Cadillac having to discount these glorified Pontiacs massively (despite Johan Zohan’s ABSOLUTE pledge to not do so), and Other refusing thus far to admit as much.

          • 0 avatar

            I’m glad you’ve pointed out the fact that my judgment on the *unrelated* Escape must be cloudy, since I’m such a stalwart supporter of Cadillac’s pricing.

            However:

            You should re-evaluate that. Not that it’s all that relevant here, but I said, among other things, that Cadillac’s pricing has actually become quite ridiculous for a brand that has only recently fallen into a competitive and desirable status. I said that Cadillac’s newest products finally feel *on par* with the leaders…not that they should be priced accordingly. I also said that I’d never buy an ATS, as it’s too small, among other things.

            As to you absolutely “nailing” your predictions about Cadillac’s failures…whoop-de-damn-do. What, do you want a cookie or something?

            I don’t think even *Cadillac* talks as much about Cadillac as you do. You’re like one of those people who is supposedly a macho homophobe, yet is always talking about gay people…

      • 0 avatar
        formula m

        DW – You explained my view of the Escape perfectly. I was going to post the same comments after reading the first post. You really didn’t need to get into the Cadillac stuff but I agreed again with your Ford MSRP opinion. I saw it first hand when I worked for Ford.

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        Fascinating DeadWeight,
        Only you would comment on a Ford SUV and turn it into a rant about hating Cadillac. We all get it, you don’t like Cadillac. You don’t their current head of the division or their PR person. But must you post it in EVERY column listed on this site?
        Give it a rest!

      • 0 avatar
        maestromario

        This is so freakin expensive!! There’s a price point where above a certain treshold it should just be called a Lincoln. (Which are glorified Fords anyway…)

      • 0 avatar
        Gregg

        So do you enjoy appearing as a bad tempered, I-told-you-so scold? Just wondering.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I’m in a bad mood, and there were 5 things brought to mind by this article that I despise:

          1. Ford’s insane pricing (at least window “stickering”)

          2. Cadillac’s complete executive & managerial incompetence, to wit:

          2(a) Johan de Nysschen

          2(b) Melody “brand, not product, matters” CT-Lee

          3. GM’s nearly total & complete incompetence

      • 0 avatar
        jrasero23

        I don’t agree with DeadWeight much but these things are insanely priced. $38K! Jesus

        Which brings me to my second point. Ford’s higher trims and high prices have kind of cannibalized the Lincoln brand.

        What no brings up is the look of the car. Maybe it’s just me but I hate this European look. The Kruger is popular in Europe but damn Ford somethings just need to stay in Europe.

  • avatar
    sproc

    The auto tailgate debacle sounds hilariously awful. It never occurred to me before, but is there a switch or setting to disable the feature?

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Wrap the key fob in aluminum foil… or just leave it inside the house when you’re not driving anywhere.

      • 0 avatar
        Timothy Cain

        Indeed, it could’ve been left in the house. But in the stop and go process of moving four vehicles around and out of the driveway to get at all the snow, constantly heading back into the house to get the keys would have been more than a little annoying.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          Or you could have left them in your mailbox, or simply put the keys on the seat of one car (not the Escape) and kept the non-active key in your pocket, or you could have left them on your steps/porch, wrapped in a towel or hat or otherwise weather-safe.

          This isn’t Ford malfunctioning, it’s operator error.

          • 0 avatar
            Timothy Cain

            If operator error causes “technology” to force me into keeping keys I’m frequently using wrapped in a towel on a porch, let me be the first curmudgeon to say, “No technology for me!”

            The internets are awash in complaints from owners who can’t get the tailgate to open when it’s prompted. Incidentally, Ford even says, “Splashing water may cause the hands-free liftgate to open.”

            A car that forces its owners to send their sets of keys elsewhere when they’re shuffling cars in a winter storm because it bizarrely becomes oversensitive to the motion of a shovel (or anything) in the same approximate region can easily be redeemed by the removal of such a feature particularly when the feature hardly works in proper practice, and even then, more awkwardly then the simply push of a button on a key fob.

          • 0 avatar
            Johann

            Erm… hence in the winter (or even all the time?!) one goes into the car’s settings and disable the feature…………. Wow. Now that took some thinking I have to say. Radical thinking even. NOT. This is a non event to rant about for four paragraphs. You may as well have ranted for four paragraphs on how you hate the wheels being black – it’s as stupid.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            Yes, this is so oddly specific (I want to shovel snow under the bumper with the key in my pocket and not have the tailgate open) that it’s laughable.

            We really are spoiled for choices in this day and age if this is what we’re left with to btch about.

          • 0 avatar
            SayMyName

            “Incidentally, Ford even says, “Splashing water may cause the hands-free liftgate to open.”

            Bet that can make for fun times when sending your $38K baby through an automatic car wash, especially since most require the key fob to stay with the car.

          • 0 avatar
            Timothy Cain

            Johann, are those wheels really black?

          • 0 avatar
            Johann

            The tyres Timothy! Or tires as you lot call it. :-)

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            ” “Incidentally, Ford even says, “Splashing water may cause the hands-free liftgate to open.”

            Bet that can make for fun times when sending your $38K baby through an automatic car wash, especially since most require the key fob to stay with the car.”

            Guarantee the feature disables if the vehicle isn’t in Park, bro.

          • 0 avatar
            Johann

            Or when the handbrake is released…

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “Guarantee the feature disables if the vehicle isn’t in Park, bro.”

            You might need it park for the auto car wash, mah nukkah.

          • 0 avatar
            formula m

            If you live where it snows often then you have to shovel behind your vehicle a few times a week. You always have keys on you to move the vehicle so you can clear the whole driveway. It’s a typical ford gimmeck like self parking and my Ford touch. What happend to all the security login pads on the drivers doors?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @formula m

            Still very much around. They’re present on FMC cars now in LED format, and are concealed in the door.

            https://casscountyford1.files.wordpress.com/2013/02/securicode.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Corey is right, it’s integrated into many of the new Ford and Lincoln products. You can add the Keyless Entry Keypad to a Ford vehicle that doesn’t come with one for around $100.

          • 0 avatar
            Liger

            I own this exact vehicle yet it’s a 2013 my. I love the vehicle. The torque vectoring awd makes it fun to drive even when theirs no snow or rain. In snow/rain, it feels invincible. It doesn’t do anything great, but it does everything well. It’s loaded, fun to drive, gets good mpg, is reliable and fun to drive. I think the stereo is great with a CD or HD radio, XM is shitty sounding due to the channels being compressed. XM sucks in any car due to that fact. I think it’s a quiet vehicle and all my friends are impressed by the way it looks outside and inside, especially the panoramic moonroof. I love it, and I got $5,000 off it’s $35,000 list price in 2013. For $440 a month it can’t be beat. Btw the power liftgate CANNOT open while the vehicle is in drive.

  • avatar
    highrpm

    I got a base Escape for my wife recently. Front wheel drive. 2.5L naturally aspired engine. It drives very nice, and she’s averaging 28 MPG! Considering a low $20s buy-in, it feels worth the price.

    There’s a $15k price difference between the base model and the Titanium version you tested, and I agree that at $38k I would be probably looking more at BMW X3s than loaded Escapes.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Low $20K is fair for this ride. $38K will get you a base LR2 in Canada (if you can find one).
      Not saying you should, but at least you would see where your money went.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “… but at least you would see where your money went.”

        I’ve gotta ask. What would you see?

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Down the toilet? I’d probably stick to the Escape if it were only a choice between the two.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          They both use the same 2.0 Ecoboost and probably the same transmission (the LR2’s replacement will use the same 9-speed as the Evoque). The LR2, of course, has an excellent AWD system, a great interior, great handling, and great looks (if that matters to you). It also gives you thicker driveshafts, stronger ball joints, and all the little things that you would expect from a premium car.

          As others have mentioned, nobody will ever pay full list for a “loaded” Escape, and Land Rover probably hasn’t yet shipped a base LR2 to North America, so the comparison isn’t fair. Still, it makes you wonder how Ford can quote that high a list price.

    • 0 avatar
      jrasero23

      I think you and @Liger brings up a good point about price. An Escape is only worth twenty something thousand but this car always has some kind of rebate or special going on. Also, remember Ford’s Lincolns don’t hold value so getting a gently low millage one would knock off probably $10k. I recently saw a 2014 Titanium CPO with less that 6.5k miles for under $28k.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “240 horsepower (231 on regular fuel) doesn’t feel as special as you thought 240 horsepower would feel in a small SUV because the horses are saddled with nearly 3800 pounds.”

    I’m not a guy who normally whines about the weight of modern vehicles but “holy fat-suit Batman!” A 2008 to 2013 Highlander V6 AWD only weighs 4200 lbs and it is a 7 passenger CUV with a 5,000 lb tow rating.

    Heck the previous generation Escape weighted 4WD: 3,457 lbs meaning it gained around 400 lbs in the redesign. A current Hyundai Tucson still weighs 3,483 lbs and it is a IIHS top safety pick.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Hell, the “heavy” Ford D-platform CUVs run from 4400-4800 pounds. They get better MPGs than 19 too.

    • 0 avatar
      caldwa

      The main reason I wouldn’t consider one is the poor Small Overlap crash test rating from IIHS – what use is all that heavy steel if it’s not for safety?

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      I do not understand these numbers given in the review.
      I looked it up and nobody shows these.
      Edmunds has this:
      Edmunds.com
      Escape weight 3,769
      Honda 3,545
      So what gives?
      And besides…the Escape rides totally different that he suggest. I enjoy mine and it is not jittery.
      It is one of the most composed Utes I have experienced…especially at the price…I paid 25 plus change for my 13 w/2.0 eco with most stuff. And I am averaging 2.5 and above…but never seeing winter weather.
      I think this is very confusing review and people need to get past comparing to the CR V as it is more of a functioning box.

      • 0 avatar
        Timothy Cain

        The review says the Escape weighs nearly 3800 pounds. 3769 is almost 3800 pounds. (The Canadianized spec chart of the same review on GoodCarBadCar shows 3769. Ford says this is the base curb weight of a 4WD 2.0L EcoBoost.)

        “The ride/handling balance is wonderfully fine-tuned. The suspension, even on 19-inch wheels, masks the impact of harsh road imperfections….”

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          thanks for the reply, mr c.
          however…it would be more accurate to say it is just over 3,750 pounds.
          but my point was more that the CR V is 3.550, or a difference of ONLY 200 pounds.
          this doesn’t seem really that much.
          not to me. at least not enough to be a critical part of a review.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    More reporting of the torque vectoring in the snow, please. This is its most desirable feature to me.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      If it works as well as the sport diff in an Audi S4, you should be able to spin in place at greater than one revolution per second.

      Did you get a chance to measure the rotational frequency of this Escape, Mr. Cain?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    As usual, adding many options to this thing makes the price of entry waaaay too high for its size. And even if the ride and handling are nice, if there’s a bunch of NVH I’m going to be in a bad mood when I get where I’m going anyway.

    And why would you need park assist in such a small vehicle, which always has a backup camera anyway?

    PARKING NO HARD AMERIKERS.

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      “if there’s a bunch of NVH I’m going to be in a bad mood when I get where I’m going anyway.”

      I don’t know what Timothy is talking about, it’s one of the quietest CUV’s in it’s class.

  • avatar
    Johann

    Four paragraphs to show the entire word what a tool you are?! Even a child would have said: “Daddy why don’t you just leave the car’s keys in the kitchen”. And even a teenager would have said: “I’m sure there is a tick box in the settings to disabled the feature.” Gosh. Rocket Science? Hardly. FOUR PARAGRAPHS!!!?

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      I wanted to say the same thing, four paragraphs? But, my opinions “telling the truth” in the past only upset too many people. Some people just take longer to learn the obvious and not blame others or this case an suv. Kinda like blaming the girl with the short skirt and big breasts. It was her fault that I made a comment and grabbed her ass. I could not help myself, look at her.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      You missed the earlier explanatory comment by a second. Ford’s manual made no mention of any disabling feature. Nothing would have been more annoying than consistently crossing snowdrifts to return frequently-in-use keys to any location other than my pocket. The issue wasn’t simply that the tailgate was lifting because the shovel or a foot were doing what the tailgate requires to fulfill its function, but that the tailgate was attempting to fulfill its mission when human action was undertaken in the region of the Escape’s rear. Hence the use of the word, “overzealous.”

      • 0 avatar
        Volt 230

        When this feature first came out, everyone in the auto media was singing its praises without one second considering all the problems that it could bring, why not just have a button on the key fob like everyone else? No, Ford has to try to outsmart everyone else.

      • 0 avatar
        mmdpg

        The manual doesn’t say anything about disabling the lift gate feature that I could find but it did say the key needs to be about 3′ from the back bumper to make it work. You might be able to put the key on the front seat or on the console if they are more than 3′ from the back bumper. Same would go for washing the car or running it through a car wash.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Getting the top of the line in many vehicles is not worth it. That is what I get from this review. I can now see why CR-V continues to lead the segment in sales, while the Escape excels in some things and not so much in others, the Honda does everything very well.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      No…it dos not.
      The Honda drives like the box it is.
      OK…that’s cool if you need a hauler and would drive me nuts as a daily drive. But just like the Prius…let it be for what it is…but it is NOT a driver and not at all engaging.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    I recently rented the same vehicle Escape with 37,000 miles on it in the SE trim, which had the 2.0 EB and awd. I averaged 24.8 mpg and basically drove it like a rental car. Flooring it when possible and going 80 mph on the hwy. It did drop to 19 in the city and understandable with my heavy foot. But, over all it was 24.8 for two tanks of gas. Early last year I rented 2013 Rav4 awd in the base LE trim, it had 29k miles on it. It did get 30 mpg hwy but dropped very quickly to 21 in the city. And it averaged around 25 mpg. It was inferior in almost every level, dash was squeaky, interior bits felt very cheap, power was barely adequate compared to the 2.0 EB. But, the brakes felt like my old 1981 Plymouth Champ. Almost go cart in feel and extremely mushy. When returning the rental the agent said ” all the rav4 have crappy brakes”. Having said this, and not having the learning curve of the automatic lift gate the Escape is winner. Both vehicles have great incentives, local dealers are taking between 5 and 7 thousand off Escapes and about 3 to 4 thousand off Rav4’s. But, the Escape is the only vehicle that I could comfortably own.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    It would be a good move by Ford to offer Leather on the SE. Other than that, I quite like the Escape Titanium. It gives the Audi Q5 a serious run for its money.

    The only thing I don’t like about the Escape is the tiny gas tank. It’s range is seriously like 200 miles. That’s pathetic.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      “I quite like the Escape Titanium. It gives the Audi Q5 a serious run for its money.”

      Wow.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      You can get leather on an Escape SE now. It’s a $1200 option before discounts and comes with heated seats, heated mirrors, and a couple of other things. There is also the SE Chrome package that gives the Escape partial leather seats plus bling.

      The gas tank is 15.5 gallons. That is about the size of the other CUVs in it’s class. The Rav4, Cherokee, and CR-V all have gas tanks between 15 and 16 gallons. You are used to the Q5, which basically has a 20 gallon tank.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        I have driven all three and OWN a Q7 (new). I have context, not just paper.

        There is also an Outback in my stable which has a 19.x gallon tank with a solid highway range of 400mi. That is the benchmark.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I’ve driven all the mentioned cars as well.

          I agree that the Escape should have a larger gas tank. My C-Max has only a 13.3 gallon gas tank, but I get 550 miles out of a tank. Last time I drove an Esacpe, I was getting 350+ miles out of a tank. The MKC is worse with the 2.3T.

          And you are spoiled with that Q7 as far as fuel capacity. 26.4 gallons is huge. That’s more than many V6 full size trucks. The Q7 is an outlier in terms of fuel tank size, but that is one of it’s strong points.

          • 0 avatar
            Chocolatedeath

            Dont know if everyone noticed but Ford as much as I love them have had smaller than competitors fuel tanks for years now. The Fusion hybrid has like what a 13 gallon tank (really). What is the point of it getting 40 mpg if I can just get gas model and get the same overall mileage with the 16 gallon tank. Even the Flex is 3 gallons short of the Pilot/ Cx9 (mine) and any other CUV in its category. Nissan did it with the Altima years ago a it went from 20 to 16 I think and even VW did it to the Passat.

  • avatar
    jmo

    I have a question. Why do the B&B (cough deadweight cough) object to automakers offering high trim levels? IIRC, in Europe you can buy a $50k Golf with dynamic chassis control, all wheel drive, self parking, radar cruise, etc. etc. At the other end, I think you can still get one with rear crank windows.

    Why is that a problem?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      For the same reason that anyone who would put ventilated leather seats, radar cruise control & self-park assist in a Kia Accent a total retard.

      Loading up a plain Jane or economy car, like this Escape with its Focus-based platform, to anywhere near 30k, let alone 38k, even if by MSRP, is like competing in the Special Olympics.

      THE ESCAPE IS A TALL FOCUS, FFS!

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        For $38K just buy the damn Explorer Limited with AWD and save some money.

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          Explorer is too big for many people.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I get it. I don’t hate the Escape like DW does, but I can’t see myself paying close to $40K for one. I think it’s a perfectly fine vehicle at around $30K and under.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            “I get it. I don’t hate the Escape like DW does, but I can’t see myself paying close to $40K for one. I think it’s a perfectly fine vehicle at around $30K and under.”

            It’s not that I “hate” the Escape (I don’t).

            I resent the obscene over-reaching when it comes to gadget overstuffing and window sticker games.

            Ford is far from alone in this inefficient and time wasting exercise; everyone from Kia to Chrysler to Cadillac does it.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “gadget overstuffing”

            If you don’t want them don’t buy them. Why is it wrong for a company to offer a wide range of options choices to consumers?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Fair, then we are on the same page. Pricing has gotten out of control.

        • 0 avatar
          dtremit

          Except the Explorer Limited 2.0 Ecoboost *with* all these tech toys stickers over $45k.

          Look, it’s easy for folks around here to say “hey, for that money you could buy a bigger car with less equipment.” But a lot of buyers will benefit from the tech stuff a lot more than the larger car.

          If you live in the city — and a lot of compact CUV buyers do — you are going to find Park Assist a lot more valuable day to day than an extra 2′ in vehicle length.

          When I rented an Explorer a few months ago, the reaction from multiple friends and coworkers was along the lines of “wow, why are you driving the QE2?”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            For $45K, I’d just forget about extra tech toys and get an Explorer Sport with the powered rear liftgate and Nav. Give me AWD and the 3.5TT for under $45K.

            If the market supports a $38K Escape, Ford should sell one. More power to them.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            BB you can get an Explorer Sport with the 3.5 TT for under $39k

            http://m.jarrett-ford.com/Sebring/For-Sale/New/Ford/Explorer/2015-Sport-Silver-SUV/36441433/

            I’ve also seen them for 37.5k a few months ago.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            VW16v-

            I was just going by MSRP. You are right though, you can get a Sport in the high 30s. However, you should also be able to get a Escape Titanium for well under $35K.

          • 0 avatar
            Dave M.

            I wholeheartedly agree. Sadly I’m a large guy (6’3″, 200#ish) that likes smaller footprint vehicles. My Trooper was ideal; it’s taken some adjustment for the additional 4″ in length with the Outback; my wife’s Edge seems like a behemoth on the great occasion I drive it.

            I should tell you about the time I drove my FIL’s Tundra. Holy crap.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Some people don’t buy cars by the pound.

          I like smallish cars, and I am growing to like toys more and more as I get older. I want my small car with all the toys. I don’t NEED anything bigger.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I certainly don’t.

            I’d prefer a 328i to a Cadillac XTSpala , for example.

            And speaking of pounds, this Escape is morbidly obese, so maybe some people like it at least in part for this.

            Finally, this is a C1 platform, meaning it has the same chassis/platform (and I’d venture to guess shares many mechanical systems with) as the Ford Focus $15,000 hatchback/sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Stated another way:

        A 15k (yeah, 15k) Focus & this 38k MSRP (asinine) Escape have the same chassis/bones/platform/mechanical-things-that-were-engineered-and-fabricated-and-of-substance.

        Consumers are morons.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Evidently the Escape is actually named Kuga and it along with Focus and C-Max share the Ford C1 platform. While I’m sure there are some materials improvements over a base model Focus and loaded Escape, DW is essentially correct and people are foolish to pony up serious money for Escape, especially given its lackluster fuel economy.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ford_platforms

          Fun fact on Focus though:

          “The Focus that raced in the 2014 Bathurst 12 Hour was powered by a 5.0 L Ford Coyote V8 engine.”

          So there is hope for the platform, right?

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Focus

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          @Deadwieght

          I think you are being a bit extreme, but ultimately I do agree with you. I would rather have a more basic example of a premium car than a loaded version of a pedestrian car if I only have $X to spend.

          Having had a new Escape for a rental I think it is a perfectly nice little rig for a lot of money. For a little more money I would buy more basic German. Or really, do what I actually did and buy an ancient British SUV and pocket the $35K difference in price. The Japanese competition is cheap to buy and cheap to own, but also just plain cheap feeling.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        For the same reason

        You don’t explain why it’s stupid. If you want a little car and love cooled seats and a heated steering wheel – should you have to buy a Lexus or Audi?

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        So basically you’re saying that only vehicles that meet your discerning and yet to be fully explained tastes are the only ones that should have extra options on them? Thank you for saving so many of us of so much time by being the vehicle buying arbiter of the internet. The public awaits your Solomon-like decisions on what vehicles we should buy and what options they should have. I think a great many people, with the chance of drawing your internetz ire, will buy what ever they darn well please. It’s their money.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Yep. Buy those loaded to the gills economy platform (or even any other class) vehicles; it makes 2 to 3 year old, low mileage arbitrage fun & rewarding for intelligent people.

          You’re right inasmuch as it’s “their money,” and they should spend whatever they can/want/can borrow.

          Nothing like 3 year old, 36,000 mile vehicles stickering for 38k new in 2015 for 14k in 2018. That’s only $670 in depreciation.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            I would hazard a guess that 95% of 3yr/36k mile vehicles you’re seeing on lots are off-lease, not off-purchase, and if that’s the case, buyers are playing with house money (subsidized leases and no risk of depreciation downside). You can argue whether or not leasing makes sense, but I don’t think anyone cares. No one is losing $24k on these things except maybe Ford.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            $670 per month (or closer to $500 is one “scores a great deal” and gets 7k off sticker!).

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            Why do you use MSRP? It’s a totally meaningless number. The only valid metric is the “out the door” price.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “$670 per month (or closer to $500 is one “scores a great deal” and gets 7k off sticker!).”

            I built one up to $37k on Ford.com and it gives me a lease price of $313 with $3600 down for 36 months ($413/mo basically) at 10.5k miles. Suggests a residual of ($413 * 36 = $14,868, $37k – $14,868) $22k.

            Go home, DW, you’re drunk.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @S2K Chris

            And importantly, the residuals on the larger, lower-spec vehicles DW would rather everyone buy are only higher by a couple of percent, if that. Including across brands.

            Buying a new car is a loser’s game. The specific new car you buy, with a few exceptions, doesn’t matter much. A mainstream car like the Escape isn’t one of those exceptions.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        The problem is that Ford hasn’t got a viable luxury division, they have a dead brand walking, Lincoln.

        And Ford is determined to leave little room for Lincoln’s Mercury-esque tarted-up but uglier Fords, by providing their own “Titanium” tarted up Fords.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        They’re profit laden, and people buy them. It’s not hard to figure out.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      “I resent the obscene over-reaching when it comes to gadget overstuffing and window sticker games.”

      The real issue is the bundling of those options into packages, often with completely unrelated function. The best example of this is found in many configurators where you check the box to add some small option and get the pop-up “this will require the addition of the [completely unrelated] package which will increase the price by $4526” message.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Yes, this! If a car has a touchscreen already, and Nav is just added with an SD card, why on earth do I need to select a $4000 option package? It infuriates me.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I’m with Bunkie,

        My biggest problem with optioning up vehicles are options that are bundled, I want the most basic Radio, no touch, but good speakers, can’t be done; another example are leather seats in 40/20/40 configuration. What I want can’t be had because I have to pay a large amount of money for a bundle of options when I only want 1 of them. Fortunately for me, mostly everything can be found aftermarket.

        • 0 avatar
          EMedPA

          The bigger problem these days is the difficulty of upgrading the modern automotive factory stereo. When I bought my first car, the first thing I did was replace the stereo. Ford until recently still had head units that fit in a double DIN slot and could be easily replaced. I’m not picking on Ford, either: with the exception of the Toyobaru FR-S I can’t think of anything that comes with an upgradable stereo anymore.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Even basic systems provide excellent mids and highs, when the lows are tuned out. Incredible how good a stock, basic stereo sounds with a piggyback subwoofer, amp and electronic x-over filter. Or bypass the stock stereo and straight amplify your phone.

            If you’re into sound processors, 5.1 channels, etc, you can still mount a head unit in the console or underdash, passenger side, with a remote control.

          • 0 avatar
            kvndoom

            Mike, “excellent” is a bit of a stretch. Of all the vehicles I’ve owned, only two have had “good” factory speakers.

            ’04 Golf- quite impressive for stock speakers, and that wasn’t even the Monsoon system.
            ’11 Accord EXL- I’d say the mids would pass for “excellent” but the tweeters were rather bright. I was surprised to find that the mids had Kevlar woven cones. I bypassed the factory amp, put in my own to power the Honda speakers, added a JL 12W6v2, and that car absolutely rocked.

            The factory radios in any other cars I’ve had, have been anywhere from “horrible” to “passable.” Sit in someone’s car who’s taken the time and expense to do even a modest SQ install and then compare it to pretty much any non-luxury car’s stereo. I bet there will be no comparison whatsoever.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        It’s even worse when you’re tall.

        Getting something as basic as lumbar adjustment for the wife or a decent radio means not only requires $4,526 in completely unrelated content but that unrelated content almost invariably includes the sunroof with which you can no longer sit upright in the car.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I’m amending my $hit list played above to 6 items, now to include sunroofs.

          I loathe them. They’re pointless, and worse yet, a hindrance.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            To each his own, I wouldn’t own a car without a sunroof, but like everyone else has mentioned I don’t want a $4000 bundle to get a $1200 sunroof

  • avatar
    jmo

    Oh and: “The ride/handling balance is wonderfully fine-tuned. The suspension, even on 19-inch wheels, masks the impact of harsh road imperfections while remaining sufficiently communicative for the driver to feel confident on a twisty road.”

    A TTAC review that included a mention of ride quality? It’s a f-ing miracle!

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Great point. Reviews mostly include some psychosocial issues of the reviewer. Contemplating how others act as sheep to purchase a vehicle to how the steering wheel controls may not break at 250k miles due to personal issues of owning a foreign vs. domestic vehicle. Hey, it is all good and entertaining to read about cars and personal conflicts of owning those cars.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    I went vehicle shopping with a friend of mine who is the marketing department’s ideal customer. Divorced soccer mom with a master degree and plenty of disposal income. She had done the e-mail dance with the Ford dealer and took me along as she test drove a loaded Escape Titanium. Got done at the Ford dealer, went the to BMW dealer. She had done the e-mail dance with the BMW dealer and she took me along as she test drove an X1. She ended up buying the X1 with the rational that well, she wanted a BMW, it wasn’t THAT much more, and she wasn’t going to pay that much for a Ford. Are loaded Escapes and X1’s cross-shopped very often? I dunno, it’s what the lady wanted.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      If she wanted a car for the bling factor, you should have steered her toward a slightly used MB GLK. You can find them with under 20k miles for around $30k.

    • 0 avatar
      dswilly

      The smart buy is shopping CPO X1’s and X3’s against NEW loaded Escapes, CRV’s, Foresters, etc. You get a better car and warranty. Just have to let someone else eat the new car depreciation.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        Just have to let someone else eat the new car depreciation.

        There is no “new car depreciation” these days. The rate of depreciation is fairly stable throughout the life of the car.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Rubbish. New cars depreciate VERY quickly right away, then level off for the rest of the time (heading down until they become classics/desired and go back up). It’s a depreciation curve, not a straight line. Drop offs at the end of warranty, 50k miles, and 100k miles, additionally at around the 5-year and 10-year mark there are separate drop offs.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “New cars depreciate VERY quickly right away”

            Only if you use MSRP rather than the actual “out the door” price.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Right, so let’s say I buy this Escape. And I negotiate a good “out the door” price with some financing, and take a big chunk off of what I pay through being savvy.

            When I go to sell the car, I sell it for a lower price, because I bought it for less…

            NO. You use MSRP. You don’t go to KBB and hit the “got a good deal new” button for pricing. Ridiculous.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “When I go to sell the car, I sell it for a lower price, because I bought it for less…”

            You sell it for the market price, which is heavily impacted by the initial discount. How much you, personally, want to sell it for is irrelevant.

            Take the RLX which they are offing $7k-$10k off. If someone can buy it new for $38k are they really going to buy a two year old one for $42k because the MSRP is $48k? No, the market is efficient and the market prices of used cars reflect that.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @CoreyDL You’re missing the point. Calculating depreciation as MSRP minus used price exaggerates the initial depreciation of the car, because the owner didn’t pay MSRP.

            If a 3 year old Escape Titanium had a sticker of $38k, and is worth $22k today, most people will calculate a depreciation of $16k — $5.3k a year. But if the owner actually paid $32k, then it’s really only depreciated $3.3k a year. That’s a lot closer to what it’ll depreciate in years 4/5/6 and beyond.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            This is partly why I linked to the Cadillac real OTD pricing crisis article (Reuters) that I did above.

            1) People who paid closer to MSRP (some would call them – to be polite – naive) for ATSs & CTSs 3 months ago, when Johan declared “no price wars!,” are now screwed, as incentives are 9k and 13k off ATS and CTS sticker now (as Johan folded). That devastates their resale value even more.

            2) People who buy now with the much bigger discount can afford to sell/trade their vehicle for much less, while still coming out ahead of the former group.

            3) This devastates goodwill and residuals.

            4) The 53k CTS MSRP employee PEP vehicle with 3,000 miles and full warranty sold as new, for 25 GRAND OFF STICKER, has same effect, as that will and can eventually be resold in 3, 5 or whenever years for far less than someone else’s CTS.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Hmm. Is not the “what you get it for” price largely determined by the temporary sale the dealer near you is having, and how good you are at negotiation (or if you try)?

            Rather than an across the board “Every Mr. Smith got the Escape for $4k off in 2014MY.”

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            “Is not the “what you get it for” price largely determined by the temporary sale the dealer near you is having, and how good you are at negotiation (or if you try)?”

            Not in my experience, no. You google it, you get the invoice price minus incentives and say to the salesman, “$xx,xxx?” And he says, “Sounds good, let me write up the paperwork.”

            Are there a small percentage of folks getting taken? Sure. But, not enough of them to impact the used market.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @jmo

            RLX is too much of an outlier due to its low demand and low availability. Can you apply this logic to a mainstream make/model?

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            When you figure in the typical discounts off MSRP, depreciation is pretty darned close to straight line for most moderate priced vehicles these days. And pretty modest the first couple years, comparing apples to apples. Any car that seems to sell for a ridiculously low price at 2 years old, sold new at a huge discount. See rental-grade Impala for the poster child for this.

            IMHO, it doesn’t matter. You are paying a relatively small premium for what are presumably the best, most carefree years of a vehicles life. You are getting to pick EXACTLY what YOU want, not getting someone else’s sloppy seconds. You know exactly how it was treated from day one. As the ads say, “Priceless”. Unless you simply don’t give a rat’s arse, in which case you really should just be driving a used Camry.

            I saved a heck of a lot of money over the years because I drove well-used cars. But I couldn’t afford to do anything else. Now that I can afford to buy new, I buy new.

    • 0 avatar
      PJmacgee

      “Are loaded Escapes and X1’s cross-shopped very often?”

      We did.

      Wife liked the way the X1 looked, and preferred the car-like seating position of the X1 (because it’s just a tall car) to the bus driver perch in the Escape and CX-5.

      I liked that BMW lets you have the go-fast bits withOUT all the stupid tacky gizmos/my-ford-ballscratch/self-parking bs. (and Mazda just doesn’t let you have *any* go-fast bits)

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        How has the maintenance been for the x1. I know the escape is inexpensive to maintain. But does the x1 cost similar to other BMW’s ex. 3 and 5 series.

        • 0 avatar
          PJmacgee

          Well for the first 3 yrs/40k miles you get free service on everything, including wear items like wiper blades, brake pads, bulbs, whatever (and free loaner cars).

          We have about 20k miles and it’s been in twice, for oil changes. Since they only give you oil every ~9k miles, I’ve done 2 oil changes myself in between (4500 interval seems more realistic, call me old fashioned), each cost about $65 in supplies (OEM oil and filter from eBay) and about 10 minutes. Top-mounted oil filter on the engine is a revelation. I plan to have the transmission serviced (preventative) probably around 30-40k, since I’d like to keep it for at least 6-7 years.

          Otherwise, this drivetrain (2.0t/ZF8) is pretty well proven, dating back to Canadian X1s in 2010 (or earlier?), and probably many other models. Overall maintenance should be about the same as Escape. Of course we just took a rock in the windshield, so I’m sure the special magical german unicorn BMW windshield replacement will cost 5x what it should…

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            If you are in the US, BMW’s maintenance plan is 4yrs/50K on all of their vehicles. It covers everything but gas, tires, and alignment. Oil change interval is when the computer says, or annually, whichever comes first. PJMacgee – are you in Canada with the lesser coverage?

            On the oil change interval – I had oil analysis done on my car the first couple changes. The results were very much in line with what the computer calculated for remaining life using BMW’s specified oil. BMW uses both a use algorithm and an actual physical oil quality sensor, plus the engines hold a TON of oil. So the long OCIs really are perfectly fine. I am surprised that they are offering the annual changes, which is presumably to shut a lot of people up rather than due to any actual need.

            I just had my annual done on my 328!. Drove it only 5200 miles in 13 months, sadly. Too much travel this past year, my cars just sat, and sat, and sat.

            One additional issue to fix, where I rub against the driver’s door seal getting in and out, it split. They replaced it under warranty with no quibbles. Big me, small door opening. Has been an issue on almost every car I have ever owned.

          • 0 avatar
            PJmacgee

            krhodes1, I’m in the US and I’m sure you’re correct about the service plan numbers. I think I was just doing some subconscious mental math…with our higher-than-expected first year of mileage (~17k miles), I started to think “gee, this service plan might not even last us 3 years”

            That’s good to know about your oil analysis matching the OBC-calculated intervals. But like I said, call me old fashioned, cuz i am, can’t help it…$65 bucks extra per year seems like cheap insurance (and a small cost for my willful ignorance) to keep me content and that little N20 humming on into the 100,000s

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            To be honest, if BMW didn’t do the annual changes I would do them annually myself too. Not because I think they need doing on an oil life basis, but simply because it gives me a chance to get the car up on my lift and look around for any developing issues. If it is up there anyway, might as well change the oil. I’d end up going three years if I only followed the OBC at the rate I drive the car. I believe the newer cars have the one year coded into the computer, but mine does not. This way the car gets looked at 2X a year, once for safety inspection, once by me (and I am waaaaay more anal than the average inspection mechanic is). This is what I have done with all my cars for ages, with the oil change offset by six months from the inspection. I also do all the lube points, clean the sunroof drains, clean out any mud traps, that sort of thing when I do that annual “service”.

            In my experience, BMW windshields cost the same as every other car. $100. Which is the deductible on my comp insurance. :-)

    • 0 avatar
      Liger

      I bought the escape to avoid the douchebag factor of owning the BMW. Not to mention the fact that BMW’s should really only be leased for as long as the factory warranty lasts. No longer than that, or you will become poor repairing and maintaining the BMW. There’s a reason that you always see lease offers in the commercials for BMW’s with “free” maintenance.

  • avatar
    EMedPA

    Some perspective from someone who’s owned one of these for a couple of years now:

    My 2013 doesn’t have the hands-free tailgate as it came with the factory trailer hitch. Ford apparently hadn’t yet figured out how to mount the sensor with the hitch in place. I don’t miss it. I like the fact that I can tow a small trailer with the car, though. That was one of the things that pushed me towards the Escape.

    Because of the windshield’s steep rake, the panoramic sunroof is better for rear seat passengers (i.e. my kids) than for me. I wouldn’t miss it if it was gone.

    Having driven both, I would say that the handling of the Escape is far superior to that of the CRV. You can have a reasonable amount of fun on a twisty road in one of these cars.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Since the Escape sells like hotcakes, there is really not much of a case to be made that it is either not very good or overpriced. Unless of course you think you know better than the 25K or folks who buy one every month.

    To me it looks like an interesting product as it significantly more refined, luxurious and fun to drive than anything from GM, Honda, Toyota or Nissan in this segment. It also a little more expensive but clearly it has found a big market niche among buyers who just wanted something a little more refined than the RAV4 or CR-V but are not ready to step up to a luxury brand.

    That is a big change from the previous model’s mission so kudos to Ford for getting it right.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    If the Ford Escape is so good, how come the CR-V outsells every CUV on the market?

    We own a 2002 CR-V, and though it’s a handy vehicle, I wouldn’t buy one for my daily driver. Having said that, Wifey loves the noisy thing. I will admit it doesn’t break.

    A friend rented an Escape recently for a sales road trip and he did not like it at all, plus he said it was a gas hog to boot. FWIW, he drives a used Accord.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Well it isn’t an either or situation. I’d argue that the best C-platform vehicle on Ford lots is the one that doesn’t sell. The CR-V sells well because it doesn’t many things well that many people want a vehicle to do well. It’s trade-off is that it is noisy automotive Ambien. Apparently, many people are oaky with that trade off.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      While there is some market overlap, the CR-V and Escape are very vehicles vehicles with different priorities. The CR-V is current the #1 seller and the Escape #2 seller in their vehicle class – so neither is exactly selling poorly. Which is “better” entirely depends on your priorities and tastes.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      OK…the Monkeys Albums sold more than The Moody Blues. Um…which one is the better band?

      Agree with you folks.

      Edmunds.com
      Escape weight 3,769
      Honda 3,545

      Zero to 60 Honda 10.1 Escape 7.4
      So…? One is a frigging box and one is fun and sporty. So leave it alone TTAC

      Are we talking about 2 different cars here? Or is this just a Hate review???

      Wow…this is the whole problem with these sites.
      These cars are different.
      First, just going by sales is silly. Yes, that is the perfect poll taking in politics, but it doesn’t mean best.
      Just most popular.
      The Escape is a great choice. I have one.
      And I just do not understand this review. 38K for the car???!!
      38K? For an Escape????
      I purchased a new FWD with many, if not most, of the important options…like the 2.0 eco, and it averages 26 MPG…FOR 25K!
      What in hell do folks up there charge????
      Again…not winter driving and a pretty good mix of sane driving.
      Plus…according to Edmunds…” Although cargo room behind the CR-V’s second row is only 2.9 cubic feet more than the Escape, “

    • 0 avatar
      See 7 up

      You wouldn’t buy a 2002 CR-V as a daily driver, or you would buy a 2016 CR-V as a DD?
      I’m going to just assume that the 2016 is quieter and nicer all around than the 2002.

      I always find it weird when people won’t look at a new car because of the performance of a model more than 10 years old (in your case 14)

  • avatar
    olddavid

    What’s with all the vitriol? This place is degenerating into Jalop lite. And that’s no compliment. This used to be the space for adults.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I won’t be so presumptuous as to speak for others, but I still have my large balls, and my opinions are admittedly often voiced loudly & emphatically due to this fact.

      Opinions are opinions, and yet spades are spades, too. Sometimes, one’s opinion that a spade is a spade is correct, factually.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        So large balls are what’s required to spout off as an anonymous commenter on a web site?

      • 0 avatar
        Preludacris

        @deadweight Not sure what the size of your balls has to do with how outspoken you are in anonymous internet comments.

        @olddavid I agree. It’s a stark contrast when you go back and read comments on old articles, how much friendlier this place used to be.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          ANY and all criticism (not vitriol) is legitimate & aimed squarely @ Ford’s (and other manufacturers) pricing ridiculousness (as well as option bundling ridiculousness).

          • 0 avatar
            carguy

            @DW: Since the Escape sells really well (20K units a month) it would seem that the market has spoken and that Escape is not overpriced. Are you suggesting that you and your enhanced testicular fortitude know better than the 240,000 folks who buy these every year?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I was searching for some demographics on Escape buyers but came across this interesting whitepaper by JD Power.

            “Also, affordability can play a major role in the purchase decision. Some buyers, although
            highly educated and having total household income of at least $90,000 per year, may be
            saving money to put three kids through college and, rather than shopping for an Acura
            or a BMW for themselves as their demographic profile might suggest, are looking for
            something more affordable—either for themselves or one of the kids—to help offset
            other expenses.
            Another variable that demographics don’t effectively predict is consumer attitudes
            about autos and driving. Many buyers, even though they may neatly fit into a particular
            demographic profile, simply want reliable, dependable transportation. They might opt for
            a mainstream compact sedan rather than a luxury SUV as their demographic profile might
            suggest, while others may want to make a statement about their status or individual
            success. In this latter example, a consumer who fits the demographic profile of the
            typical economy car buyer may want to move up-market in an attempt to project an
            affluent image, and attractive lease pricing often makes this a reality.
            In other cases, buyers may see more value in a used vehicle. Used vehicles have become
            a more attractive option for many, given that the average transaction price of a new
            vehicle now exceeds $30,000
            1
            ; long-term vehicle quality and dependability are continuing
            to improve; and there is a proliferation of manufacturer-sponsored certified pre-owned”

            http://www.jdpower.com/sites/default/files/2011_WhitePaper_DeathofDemographics.pdf

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I have said this all along no matter how much we beat on this car or sing the praises of that car when it gets right down to signing the papers price trumps everything else. Then we go around telling everyone that the car we bought was really the one we always wanted, but just didn’t realize it

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Heh reminds me of the first few months of owning my 2007 Altima last year. Not exactly related, but a similar kind of frustration.

    Ever since I got the car, the security alarm would randomly go off while parked outside the house. At first I thought maybe it was super sensitive, or malfunctioning.

    It turns out that the key fob was designed at such a slope that the bottom button (Panic) could easily be pressed while in one’s pocket.

    So I took a small screwdriver and pried the button off. Now, I can still press the contact to set off the panic alarm if need be. But it has never inadvertently alarmed since.

    Suddenly, my trunk started opening by itself at random times. Once was right before a major rainfall, so I caught it just in time.

    It turns out that the key fob was designed at such a slope that once the bottom button was removed, then next-to-bottom button (Trunk Release) could easily be pressed while in one’s pocket.

    Pried that one off too. Only buttons left are the lock and unlock. Neither has pressed by accident, so problem solved.

    Cars, they do the darnedest things…

  • avatar
    slnordt

    Always lots of opinions about cars. I own 2013 Titanium 4wd with every option. Discounts/incentives brought it down from high 30’s to low 30’s, just as others say. Only one issue ( wiring harness recall) in 2 years. Mileage 22-26 which is ok. As others have said, others like Rav 4 don’t do much better. CRV and CX 5 do better but have much less power. Performance is better than the 170 ish HP competitors. Escape has luxury features like dual memory seats not available on others. Interior is nicer. MY Ford Touch gets criticized ( works ok once you use it) but the competitors are far worse. I (and other road testers) have found highway noise low. I shopped new and CPO X3’s, you can’t get one with the options you want in the low 30’s. X1 is much smaller.

    • 0 avatar
      AnotherMillenial

      I’ve always viewed the Escape as a pretty awesome daily driver that ticks all the boxes at a reasonable price. In my experiences, it’s just a better engineered car than the CR-V brigade. The CR-V is fine but it leaves you left with the “if I could just afford better” sensation. The Escape feels like you got a steal and is the all-rounder vehicle in general that the mid-30k Explorer and loaded AWD Fusion can’t be. It’s not a Q5 but it’s as close as it gets without buying the Q5. The Escape Platinum 4WD is definitely the one to buy and bringing it down to the low 30s takes all the doubt away. I did think that it would be an excellent competitor to the CPO X3 or Q5, but I thank you for stating that with the equivalent options, it just wouldn’t work out. Your lack of high-priced repairs is icing. If I could afford to do so, that would be the exact one I’d buy and not feel disappointed when other cars pull up.

      The X1 IMO is for brand-snobs with their head too deep up their buns to realize they would’ve been better off with a 3-series and a ZipCar account.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “The Escape, now in the third model year of its second-generation”

    Third generation

    1st gen 2001-2007

    2nd gen 2008-2012

    3rd gen 2013-present

    • 0 avatar

      Remember those 1st-gens when they came with little 4×4 switches and 5-spds?

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I too miss the 1st gens, they were definitely made to be ‘trucky’ mini-Explorers rather than suave Euro-CUVs, complete with separate opening hatch glass, but we can see that smooth/sporty CUV is in right now so I don’t blame Ford. Nasty interiors with uncomfortable seats and terrible transmissions, and a propensity to rust as they aged, but I still like them a lot. It was the first compact SUV with a V6 as I recall, I drove a friend’s 2001 with the 3.0 and came away impressed, aside from the interior finish. it handled and rode well and the Duratec 3.0 struck me as plenty potent and smooth.

  • avatar
    Liger

    I own this exact vehicle yet it’s a 2013 my. I love the vehicle. The torque vectoring awd makes it fun to drive even when theirs no snow or rain. In snow/rain, it feels invincible. It doesn’t do anything great, but it does everything well. It’s loaded, fun to drive, gets good mpg, is reliable and fun to drive. I think the stereo is great with a CD or HD radio, XM is shitty sounding due to the channels being compressed. XM sucks in any car due to that fact. I think it’s a quiet vehicle and all my friends are impressed by the way it looks outside and inside, especially the panoramic moonroof. I love it, and I got $5,000 off it’s $35,000 list price in 2013. For $440 a month it can’t be beat.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    I think if I was going to spend that kind of money, I’d get a Volvo V60 or XC60. I just wasn’t that impressed with the Focus SE we drove. Engine was loud, road noise was loud, and wind noise was barely tolerable.

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Driven the Escape with this powertrain…A weak, weak 240 hp (less actual power – at least with it’s excess weight than the 200 underrated hp in an Audi Q3 or VW Tiguan.

    Best route: Sacrifice some cargo space and get an Audi Q3 for a few grand more (or close to the same if you scratch a few options). Rear seat space is similar, just less cargo room in the Q3…No dealing with the ‘Focus-level’ interior either as Audi does it right, even in a lower level Q3.

    The Q3 will also return much better real world mpg…Just what I’d do…

  • avatar
    klossfam

    Driven the Escape with this powertrain…A weak, weak 240 hp (less actual power – at least with it’s excess weight than the 200 underrated hp in an Audi Q3 or VW Tiguan).

    Best route: Sacrifice some cargo space and get an Audi Q3 for a few grand more (or close to the same if you scratch a few options). Rear seat space is similar, just less cargo room in the Q3…No dealing with the ‘Focus-level’ interior either as Audi does it right, even in a lower level Q3.

    The Q3 will also return much better real world mpg…Just what I’d do…

    • 0 avatar
      Liger

      I don’t understand the hate on this car. It’s based on the focus everyone wanted that used to read this website (when it had knowledgeable, likeable editors). It’s almost exactly the same thing as the kuga in Europe and elsewhere outside of the us. It’s a direct injected turbo 4wd with torque vectoring. 0-60 time is 7 seconds and it never has a lack of power anywhere under 100mph. Nothing in its class (audi, bmw, land rover are obviously not in it’s class) is quicker than the escape. Every reputable magazine website ranks the escape at or near the top of its class, even consumer reports. The foot activated tailgate seems gimmicky, and if it was an individual option, I wouldn’t of gotten it, but its standard on the titanium (which I own). Yet its a great feature when you need to load or unload the cargo area and your hands are full and you can’t get your keys out of your pocket. And the power tailgate will not work unless the vehicle is in park….

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    Had a rental Escape Titanium recently, and it impressed the whole family enough that we wondered whether buying German luxury brands like we have been was actually justified.

    Anyone who finds the 2.0L Ecoboost to be lacking power probably drove the 1.6L without realizing it. 0-60 in the high 6s is not slow, even by today’s standards. It was quiet, composed and comfortable on the highway, with all that torque ready to be deployed with little effort on the driver’s part. But the best thing by far was the road manners. The ride/handling balance is extremely well-judged – very European, as a matter of fact. Not surprising given its Kuga roots.

    I’d buy one. SRSLY.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    That foot activated trunk release doesn’t make sense. Seeing someone behind their Escape waving their foot in hopes of it opening fast is funny. That little delay with my hands full would piss me off. Press the fob and its instantaneous- much more logical.

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