By on January 13, 2015

2016 BMW 6 Series 04

Behold the new face of luxury: the 2016 BMW 6 Series.

Our brothers at AutoGuide report the facelift includes revised grill openings, a front apron with a single air intake opening, fog lamps whose decorative surround changes on the body style, and updated headlamps. Revised side view mirrors and a redesigned backside emphasizing the BMW’s wide track make up the rest of the exterior changes.

Under the bonnet is the same story from before: 315-horsepower six-cylinder or 445-horsepower V8, with RWD and AWD available for the 6 Series coupe, gran coupe and convertible. Those who opt for the 640i will have a standard sport exhaust system with switchable exhaust to enhance or reduce exhaust notes.

The revised 6 Series is set to arrive in showrooms Q2 2015.

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15 Comments on “NAIAS 2015: BMW 6 Series Reveals New Face For 2016...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    I really wouldn’t spot this on the road and say it’s new, if this was in my field when scanning for cars I would just say 5-series and pass it over.
    It really doesn’t look much different than the older one.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree, more and more I see a “refresh”, and I have to stare really hard to spot the difference. Maybe that’s just me getting older. For this one, I see it’s got a Ninja Turtle mouth, kinda like the Optima.

  • avatar
    kefkafloyd

    Am I the only one who hates the hood cuts on these BMWs? It does not look aesthetically pleasing. A lot of cars are doing it like that these days, but for whatever reason it feels like it should extend down to the kidneys on the grille. Or even include the kidneys, like in older models.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I agree. It’s unnatural there.

    • 0 avatar
      Chris FOM

      No. It’s terrible. Fortunately the new 7-series has the cut line across the top of the kidneys, so hopefully that will remain true with the rest as well.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      They probably had to do this because older BMW cars had a distinct hood/grill and separate bumper cover. (think e46) Now the grill is flush with the bumper. It would be unacceptable to have hood damage in a minor 3mph impact, but that’s exactly what would happen if the hood extended down around the grill. Also, the hood is probably aluminum, while the bumper cover needs to be plastic for obvious reasons.

      • 0 avatar
        kefkafloyd

        Two fair points. Still, it only seems to be the BMW that sets me off. Yet I do not have the same kind of reaction when I see a Kia Optima, Ford Fusion, or a Mazda 6. I think it’s because the kidneys don’t take up as much of the front end, proportionally, as those models’ grilles.

    • 0 avatar
      CRConrad

      No, you’re not the only one. On the contrary, you’re late to the party: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/03/vellum-venom-2012-bmw-328i-sedan/#comment-1868392

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    To echo the above, doesn’t really look all that new, just a slight refresh. Also, pity there’s no photo of the revised rear, since the ass was already the best part of this car, especially in coupe form.

    The 6 coupe is a 6, this 6GC should fall under the 5 category. Maybe the 5GC-SportDrive-iXDrive440iDcTDI.

    But seriously the only BMWs I find attractive are the 6-Coupe and certain versions of the 4-Coupe.

  • avatar
    gakoenig

    The cuts have to do with Euro pedestrian safety standards. The three big requirements are:

    1- There needs to be space between the top of the engine and the hood, allowing a pedestrian impact some crumple zone buffer. Just like regular crumple zones, this is intended to decelerate a pedestrian’s skull before contact with the (basically immovable) engine.

    2- The whole front of the car needs to be raised in proportion to frontal area. This reduces the rotational moment of inertia on an average size human from both the forces of flipping over the hood and spreads the loa of the initial impact on the lower body.

    3- The hood opening can’t create a leading edge that essentially acts as a knife on ped impact, for the obvious and macabre reasons.

    Not that I’m saying BMW’s solution is great – I think the cut on the hood is like a giant nose job scar on a really pretty woman, but that’s what’s driving it.

    • 0 avatar
      kefkafloyd

      “I think the cut on the hood is like a giant nose job scar on a really pretty woman”

      Great way to put it. It just feels… lazy. Like, this car costs more than the median income of US citizens, and this was the best they could do? It’s an affliction upon BMW coupes and sedans that just doesn’t look good.

      The hood cut on my lowly Mazda 3 hatchback (on the smiley face car, no less!) looks better.

  • avatar
    1998S90

    I actually like it.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    Wow. I never would have expected such a radical departure from BMW. This changes *everything*.

  • avatar
    kovakp

    You’ve arrived!
    Here’s your 6-Series!
    Now fold yourself into it, ya bastard.
    heh heh

    Honestly, when is this roof slamming going to end?

  • avatar
    anomaly149

    Did they end up putting that two-pull hood latch design in this one? Last year it was in the 3, 4, and I think 5.

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