By on January 21, 2015

USA muscle car sales chart 20142014 was the fifth consecutive year in which the Chevrolet Camaro outsold its two key rivals in the United States.

2015, however, could present far different results.

Leading up to the sixth-generation Mustang’s arrival, the Camaro led the Mustang by nearly 11,000 sales through the first ten months of 2014.


• Second-best year for fifth-gen Camaro

• Mustang was on a roll at the end of 2014

• Challenger growth continues in sixth consecutive year


But Ford sold 8728 Mustangs in America in November, a 62% year-over-year improvement, basically double the number of Camaros sold that month.

By the end of December – when Mustang sales shot up 66% to 9511 units – the gap was closed to 3662 units. That was nearly on par with 2013, when the Camaro ended the year 3381 sales ahead.

While much of the Mustang’s late-2014 success can be attributed to the hyped MY2015 car’s arrival, these big numbers did appear at the onset of winter. Prime Mustang buying season typically revolves around the months of May and June. In 2012, for instance, the last time Ford sold more than 80,000 Mustangs in America, one-quarter of the nameplate’s total year-end sales occurred during May and June.

In other words, we may not grasp the car’s full potential for marketplace success in its home market until the end of 2015’s second quarter.

Subcompact
2014
2013
% Change
Chevrolet Camaro
86,297
80,567 7.1%
Dodge Challenger
51,611
51,462 0.3%
Ford Mustang
82,635
77,186 7.1%
Total
220,543
209,215 5.4%

Meanwhile, sales of the fifth-generation Camaro climbed to the second-highest level yet: up 7% compared with 2013, down just 2% from the 2011 high-water mark. Sales of the Dodge Challenger increased for a sixth consecutive year. Admittedly, the gains were marginal. But Challenger volume was down 10% through the end of September before monthly year-over-year gains of 27%, 51%, and 72% closed out the year.

The Challenger and Mustang weren’t the only cars to power the category to a massive December, either. The Camaro, though only second in the segment at the end of the year, shot up 32% in December, indicating that if the newer Mustang and Challenger stole any sales from the Chevy, GM managed to find many more elsewhere. The trio jumped 55% to 21,077 units in December, equal to 3.1% of the overall passenger car market.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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74 Comments on “Cain’s Segments: American Muscle Sales In America In 2014...”


  • avatar
    86er

    “The Camaro will never sell!” – boy I sure enjoyed reading those comments circa 2007.

    Translated was “this vehicle is not to my tastes so it won’t find a market”.

    Kind of like the old society lady in Manhattan who was said to exclaim incredulously on Richard Nixon’s electoral success: “nobody I know voted for him”.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Kind of like the old society lady in Manhattan who was said to exclaim incredulously on Richard Nixon’s electoral success: “nobody I know voted for him”.

      I’m still scratching my head over this one too, nobody I know voted for him either

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Ha, I remember that too. Certainly no one expected the Camaro to so quickly unseat the Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      Occam

      I admit, I’m both surprised and impressed by the Camaro’s sales. I thought it would be as successful as the GTO.

      It’s good that the Camaro was dead for a few years – the nameplate had such a low-brow stigma as a poor man’s Corvette, a car already suffering from its reputation as a “white-trash Ferrari.” Even then, I joked that a dealer option would be a case of Michelob and a warrant. I’m glad I was wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I always thought the Camaro was ugly (every generation of it)… but I never for a second thought people wouldn’t buy the new one, because I saw that people, for reasons impenetrable to me, loved the thing.

      (I mean, of the three, the only one I can half stand is the Mustang.

      But the segment is not my segment, and I hate coupes. AND cars with “hips”.)

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        No “hips”? The straight belt line went out with the ’63 Impala coupe. There were hips on just about every pony car from ’65 on. Even the poor man’s pony car of yore, the Plymouth Duster, had hips. A pony car is pretty much the last place to look for a 3-box design, and that’s what you’ve got with no hips.

        • 0 avatar
          Occam

          The “hips” thing has really just reappeared in the recent past though. The Mustang didn’t really have them from 1979 until 2009, the Camaro didn’t have it through the 80’s and 90’s. The Corvair look that became so influential in Europe eventually spread back here, and the straight belt-line was ubiquitous from about 1980 on.

          The hoffmeister kink and the beltline kickup seem to have merged into a delta shape to the end of the side windows – it’s on everything now!

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Thanks Pete. Here’s another take on that old chestnut:

      http://www.vanityfair.com/online/wolcott/2012/10/The-Fraudulent-Factoid-That-Refuses-to-Die

      Certainly not to the manor born, but either would travel in exclusive circles. My point stands, and this comment thread has been a wonderful sociological study to that end.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Only 2-door muscle cars need apply? Just curious, what segment is the Cadillac CRT-V Coupe?

  • avatar
    Occam

    If you’re including Muscle AND Pony cars, the Charger seems like it should be on there.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    It’ll be interesting to see exactly how the 2016 Camaro pans out versus the competition and how the market responds. Ford has certainly played their hand well with the new Mustang and the sales are rolling in. The new Challenger is proving to be very popular as well. What will the Camaro do to set itself apart?

    • 0 avatar
      Occam

      The 2015 Mustang is drop-dead gorgeous. If I could get a V6 or Ecoboost Mustang with the functional rear seat of the Challenger, I’d buy one today. If I could get a Challenger with a stick and not have to get the monster engine, I’d be strongly tempted. The Mustang and Camaro are functionally two-seaters, and I can’t do a two-seater at this point.

  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    Not hard to see why the Mustang sales shot up at the end or the model year. Not only did they have fire sales on them (upwards of $10K on the hood in the greater Boston area) but there are always those who are afraid of what the next generation will look like so they saw it as their chance to grab what they know they like just before it became unavailable.

    It should be interesting to see how things compare once the “new” Camaro is introduced. Hopefully the style will be changed more than it appears to be changed on the various prototypes spied currently.

    Its great that this war still exists. It’s a lot more exciting than seeing what the best selling vanilla sedan is for 2014.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Think of how much more turned on we would be by these figures if they were:

    Cadillac Eldorado
    Lincoln MKIX
    Imperial Coupe

    Mmm PLC.

  • avatar
    ridwan

    I haven’t driven the new Mustang, but the thing is, the Camaro came out and it was an interesting looking car with a nice interior and decent driving characteristics. And that’s the base model.
    So this makes perfect sense– I’m more confused how the Challenger sold so much compared to the Mustang. Maybe just the (comparative) novelty.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Maybe there’s some regional thing? Or this is a new trend in the sales data?

      I see Mustangs frequently. Camaros often, but less so.

      Challengers are rare around here. (Unlike Chargers, which are common both as normal cars and police cruisers.)

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Shows that Chevy, Ford and Mopar “guys” are about equally distributed. These buyers are pre-disposed to prefer a particular brand; unless the car is a total POS, that’s what they’ll buy.

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    This is interesting, and I’m curious how the sales break down by region. I was initially surprised the Camaro outsold the Mustang, but that’s probably because it doesn’t seem all that popular in the Philly metro area. They’re certainly around, as are Challengers and Chargers, but the Mustang seems more prevalent. I therefore suspect the Camaro must dominate other regions.

    Regardless, I fully expect the Mustang to rule this segment in 2015. I’ve driven a GT Premium with 6MT, and it’s astoundingly good. With solid interior quality and surprisingly good ergonomics and visibility, it’s both muscle car and thoroughly modern GT coupe that IMO could poach sales from outside the traditional pony car segment.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Indeed – I never see Camaros around New England at all. Tons of Challengers and Mustangs, no Camaros. They must sell REALLY well in the flyover states.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        I see at least as many Camaros as I do Mustangs in the greater Boston area. It’s fairly rare to see a Challenger outside of the few in my immediate neighborhood.

        • 0 avatar
          burgersandbeer

          Challengers might appear more common than they are because you will always notice them.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            True. I think the majority are rentals.

            People up here don’t buy many of these cars to use unless they are buying a toy. God forbid you buy a car that doesn’t offer awd or isn’t a Subaru. Sudden death and the wrath of God will be your ending.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            And I would think Camaros would be the same, because they REALLY grab my eye every time I see one. Which is rarely.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Also interesting. Very regional evidently.

          Here in my city, the Chevy, Dodge, and Ford stores are just about in sight of each other on the same main road. The Ford and Dodge stores each have a great big long line of Mustangs and Challengers respectively (10+), the Chevy store never has more than 1 or 2 Camaros in stock. They usually have more Corvettes than Camaros. The other close Chevy store (different owners) is the same. Perhaps they have just found they can upsell to the Corvette here. The Ford and Dodge stores don’t really stock base cars, they are all pretty high end.

          As someone who loves the idea of these cars (but is always disappointed in the actual execution), I always give them a look as I roll by. Especially the Mustang, I really, really, really want to like, but then I drive one and the illusion is shattered. The EcoBoost ‘Stang was just a huge disappointment. Still a boat.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Around Houston it seems to be pretty equal. There is a Mustang shop up the highway from me, so I tend to see a lot of hot rod Fords running around.

    • 0 avatar
      Secret Hi5

      Camaros seem to be very popular in military cities, e.g. San Antonio.

  • avatar
    Madroc

    The “pony car” segment is pretty arbitrary IMO. No Charger (or any number of other muscled-up sedans or SUVs) because 4 doors. No Gen Coupe because Korean. No Toyabaru Twins because Japanese, and because smaller and less powerful. No hot hatches because FWD. No CTS-V Coupe, 1/2-series, G37, 370Z, etc. because whatever reasons.

    There may in fact be buyers who will only consider a car with each of (a) legacy Big 3 manufacturer; (b) 2 doors; (c) RWD; and (d) a name not shared with any other car, but I bet that’s a minority of buyers for any of these cars. It certainly wasn’t the only thing I cross-shopped, and if what I read on various mustang fora is any indication, I’m not alone.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      No Gen coupe, Toyobaru twins, hot hatches, 1/2-series, G37, 370z because no V8. CTS-V fits what I cons1der the fundamental criteria (V8, RWD, 2-doors), but is expensive. I think of pony cars as somewhat affordable, and the CTS-V coupe with a $69k msrp is about $30k more expensive than well-equipped V8 trims of the Mustang, Camaro, and Challenger.

      I guess the price criteria is arbitrary, though thanks to marketing, the notion of pony cars being affordable is likely common. Just as I think a so called pony car should be affordable, marketing departments that push the more expensive metal don’t want the pony car label. It lacks exclusivity. Otherwise the CTS-V, the 6-series, and various Mercedes AMG models should be cons1dered similar.

      Ignoring the four door criteria, Top Gear compared an E63 AMG to the Camaro as a muscle car. Alex Dykes compared the Challenger to a 6-series in his reviews.

      tl;dr – Many of the cars you mentioned are not pony cars for a clear reason (no V8), though the segment does admittedly become arbitrary as you climb the price ladder.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Wasn’t the “Pony Car” always about having a cheap entry model, too?

        It’s an arbitrary segment because it’s an evolved one, not an imposed one; it’s irrational because people are irrational.

        (And… man. I like the Genesis, but the Genesis Coupe is the ugliest thing on that list. And I say this as someone who thinks the Camaro is hideous.)

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    On Camaro5 the Camaro guys don’t seem to cross shop much at all, if they do it’s the Challenger and the Mustang.

    On the Challenger boards, the Challenger guys cross shop the Camaro and Mustang.

    I don’t frequent the Mustang boards, but are you telling me the Mustang guys cross shop the toyobarus and 370z?

    I can tell you as a Challenger owner, that the toyobaru’s and 370z’s never really come up. Occasionally a WRX may be mentioned, but not cross shopping, that’s usually the person’s LAST car before they traded it in on a Challenger. I may be surprised on the Mustang, but I just don’t see a lot of cross shopping in this segment except between the 3.

    • 0 avatar
      majo8

      While this is only a sample of one, I did cross shop the new Mustang with the BMW 2, and ended up buying the Ford. There are a few people on the Mustang forum that have done the same. My guess is that most buyers in this segment are brand loyal.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      A friend of mine just traded his IS350 on a Challenger Scat Pack. So there you have it, buyers in this segment can come from many places.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The 370Z doesn’t register because as others mentioned: no V8 and (I think this is even more important) no rear seat, no trunk. You really have to totally eliminate the possibility of other people ridding along when you get a Z. As small as the back seats are in these “Pony” cars you can use them in a pinch. Personally the Challenger is too big, the Camaro has zero visibility thus my choice would be the Mustang. However what do I see the most down here in South FL: Challengers.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      For those who could get past the live rear axle, the Mustang GT and its variants have been equal to BMW coupes for the better part of a decade. The 2015 version solidifies it.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        Um, ahh. I like Mustangs, but even I have a hard time really accepting that comment.

        Maybe since the last refresh have they dynamically been pretty close. I haven’t driven a ’15, but I’d imagine it’s probably more fun to drive than a 4 series.

        • 0 avatar
          bomberpete

          Fair enough. In build and perceived quality, that’s certainly not true. My main point is that Ford has been getting harder-edged with sports Mustangs while BMW, as we all know, has been getting softer in the 3-series.

          • 0 avatar
            PonchoIndian

            I agree that BMW has been going soft for a few years now.

            I personally think the Boss was every bit as good as the M3, and better in some respects.

            I’m also glad it isn’t as refined as a BMW because that would be just plain boring. BMW lost their soul and sold out to the volume/badge whores.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            @PonchoIndian

            Then evidently BMW sold out about 30 years ago, because such uber-sporting gems as the original 318i, 325e, 524TD, and 528e, and subsequent 318ti and 528i etc. are all far softer and less sporting than anything BMW has made in the past decade. BMW has long made both fine drivers cars, and fine rolling couches, and I don’t see that the mix is much different now than it ever was.

            Take off the rose-colored glasses boys, the good old days are now.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Equal in what way? Speed? Well, sure, since that isn’t really what BMWs have generally been all about, and there are any number of cars that are faster at all price points. It sure isn’t the equal in refinement in any way, shape, or form. Or build quality, or features, or much of anything else but grunt for the money. If going fast is all you care about, then a Mustang offers a heck of a lot of performance for the money.

        A live rear axle can work pretty well on a nice smooth racetrack, but they suck pretty hard on a bumpy windy New England back road. At least they fixed that issue with the latest one. But having test driven one, and really, really, really wanting to like it, I didn’t. Still feels like a big heavy boat of a thing, it just rides a lot more nicely now. A great driver’s car seems to shrink around you as you go faster, the Mustang felt like it got bigger. Blech. And while the interior is MUCH nicer, and is up to what the car costs now, it still isn’t a BMW inside. Which is OK for the price, that is not really a criticism. For me, an M235i is well worth the extra cash. And of course, you can’t do European Delivery on a Mustang if you don’t actually live in Europe.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          The broad appeal is that both the Mustang and Camaro are working class dream cars that are actually pretty affordable. I prefer the Mustang as well, for the same reasons you cite, but I can very much see why other people prefer the much more extroverted styling of the Camaro. It certainly looks cooler than the Mustang to my eyes, like a Hot Wheels car come to life. The Mustang is kind of boring.

          The last time I had one as a rental it was a screaming orange one, and I was doing a gig at a community college in PA. That thing attracted young male attention on that campus like nothing you have ever seen. It was kind of embarrassing.

        • 0 avatar
          Nedmundo

          As for BMW, I agree with you that they’ve long offered luxury and performance variants. Nothing new there. If you wanted the “Ultimate Driving Machine,” you’ve always needed to pony up for the Sport Package, these days called Sport Line or M-Sport Line. (Or the M cars, of course.)

          IMO, the current 3 Series differs from previous generations because the Sport Line versions don’t have the same aggressive feel, mostly due to the numb electrically assisted steering. Supposedly it’s been improved since the 328i models I tested in 2012, but the steering in those was just awful — even worse than my 2010 TSX’s, which is really saying something. I couldn’t believe it. Some also feel the suspension tuning is softer, but on my test drives I didn’t sense that. That impression could come from more compliant run flat tires too…who knows?

          Point is, with the 3 and 4 Series moving slightly toward luxury outside the M versions, and the Mustang improving so dramatically, I think the latter is a more viable alternative for enthusiasts than any previous Mustang. The Performance Pack makes it a more hard-core driver’s car than the non-M 3 and 4 Series; it’s seriously tight and aggressive. (I didn’t drive one with the Performance Pack, but rode shotgun when my dad did, and the tightness was readily apparent. It rode much harder than the GT Premium I drove, and would be too stiff for Philly roads IMO.)

          I nevertheless think you’re right on that the Mustang’s major flaw is bloat. It really is big, and feels it from behind the wheel, at least at the moderate speeds I reached. I think Ford blew it on that front. (The sedan-sized trunk is the one plus from this.) I’m not sure I’d spend the extra for an M235i or about the same for a 228i, but if I did that would probably be the main reason, with the nicer interior second. I’d be more likely to spend LESS for a Focus ST, FWD and all. That car is a blast.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The steering is much improved since 2012, and I did not find it all that objectionable to start with. It IS much lighter, but I think my current (e91) BMWs steering is heavy for the sake of being heavy, and offers no real steering feel either. I’d rather have light and precise.

            You are spot on in that the better Mustang comparison is to the 2-series. I did order an M235i, so the extra cash is worth it for me. I just did not find the Mustang all that fun to drive. I like the Focus ST a lot, but I like my Fiat Abarth even better than the ST. It’s even cheaper, and a lot more rowdy. But it’s not a daily commuter for me either – if I could only have one car I would chose the Focus ST or a GTI. Probably the VW because I think it is an even better all-arounder than the Focus, even if it is not as sporting.

        • 0 avatar
          bomberpete

          krhodes1 – Those Eighties BMWs may have ridden the Yuppie wave, but I think you’re being harsh.

          Almost every U.S. car importer during that time was underachieving compared to its European counterparts. Manufacturers were still figuring out emissions certification, market demand, the old DM/Dollar differential, etc.

          To BMW’s credit, once they saw that there was a market for performance, they reacted relatively quickly with punchier 3.5 engines, M-Series, the V-8 and V-12, and sportier tuning. Yet even a 528e had steering, ride and handling that were hard-core compared to M-B, Jag and Lexus. Only Porsche and some Italians were sportier.

          IMHO, what’s going on with BMW’s mainstream offerings now is something else. They are simply running with the pack. That said, an M235i would tempt me too.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            My Mother drove a 528e for nearly 20 years. There was nothing hardcore about it, it was a German Buick. Just like a 528i today is a German Buick. Expensive, well built, and boring. A little nicer to drive than most of the competition, but not exactly a racecar. I think people read waaaaay too much into that “Ulimate Driving Machine” tagline.

            I’m not being harsh at all. I am calling it as I see it. Much as I like BMW, they have no more somehow slipped off their pedestal now than they did 30 years ago. They have always made both very sporting cars and very not-so-sporting cars. Because the very sporting cars don’t sell in enough numbers to keep the company in business, and they never have.

            And the whining that BMW has somehow lost their way has also been going on for 30-40 years, every time a new generation debuts.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    I’m surprised the Camaro outsold the Mustang, but then I’ve never warmed at all to the Camaro’s styling. Both are trying to be retro aggressive, but the Chevy is trying just too hard for my tastes. Rear suspension be damned, I’d have bought the outgoing Mustang for looks alone.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Regardless of who wins this year (hint: not the Challenger!), EVERYONE wins, because these three cars keep finding significant numbers of buyers.

    Looking forward to the next-gen Camaro.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I’m surprised the Camaro is leading this sales race. Is Chevy giving them away? It sounds like it drives really well, but that has never been enough to create sales success. It’s slightly larger than the Mustang while also having little room for people and luggage. In addition, visibility is reported as the worst of the three.

    The Mustang has generally agreeable looks, is easy to live with, and performs more than well enough for the target audience. The Challenger has enough space for people and luggage to make a passable daily driver and is probably the most comfortable cruiser. I don’t know where the Camaro excels compared to the other two that would give it the sales lead.

    Is there some broad appeal of the Camaro that I’m missing, or is GM offering huge discounts and dumping the rest on rental lots?

  • avatar
    Occam

    Crazy that none of these cars are as large a sales success as the Mustang II!

    1974: 385,993
    1975: 188,586
    1976: 187,567
    1977: 153,117
    1988: 192,410

    People hate them with a passion, but I have a strange soft-spot for them. They were arguably the first “retro” mustangs, bringing the bloated 73’s back down to the size of the original, bringing back the styling cues from the original (the separate open mouth grille and outset headlights, 7-shaped side scoops).

    I have a pet theory that the Mustang II was necessary to the Mustang’s survival by adapting to the times – it remained accessible and attractive to a wide audience, not just the drag-strip crowd. The Fox-Body continued on this path, as a car for the everyman, while the Camaro remained philosophically an early 70’s pony-car throughout the 80’s, 90’s and until its cancellation.

    The Mustang started as a car for the everyman and everywoman, the Camaro started as an answer that upped the ante. The Mustang has been everything from a reasonably efficient commuter car to a fire-breathing, tire-shredding dragon, often in the same model year.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      That was such a different time though. I mean, look at the sale of Firebirds then, or large 2 door personal luxury cars (both of which don’t exist anymore).

      The Mustang has had some shaky years. Don’t forget that the original Probe was actually supposed to be the new Mustang and the Fox-body was supposed to be gone.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      I caught this ’77 Mustang II on a Brooklyn street the other day.

      https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152732545974075&set=a.43495084074.54576.752199074&type=1&theater&notif_t=like

      Any car over 25 years old can get “historical” plates, even this Pinto-based 38 y.o. whatever. Best thing that can be said is it paid the bills during the Malaise Era and kept Ford’s prancing pony alive. The 1979 was a huge improvement, and then the horsepower came back in the Eighties.

      • 0 avatar
        Occam

        The original Mustang was also based upon Ford’s cheapest economy car. Using the Pinto is no different than using the Falcon before it. It improved the Mustang, bringing back a compact, light car, and brought it rack & pinion steering and improved suspension. More importantly, it shifted it’s target for competition from the Pony-car corpses littering the junkyards (Javelin, Barracuda, Challenger, AMX) to the new breed of compact sports cars and 2+2s hitting the streets (Z-car, for example, or Celica GT)

        The distaste seems to be as much a distaste for the era it represents (styling that didn’t age well and gutless engines) and the association with the Pinto than the car itself. FOr what it’s worth, the Camaro’s V8’s in 1975 were either 145 or 155 hp, depending on the trim. The Mustang II’s was 140. It’s hard to berate the car for anything other than the failures of its entire sad era.

        EDIT: I’ll add: I see in the 2015 Mustang signs that Ford is again positioning the Mustang for long term success. As hot-hatches and sport compacts eat into the traditional Mustang turf, they are expanding the line up-market, with BMW’s M-series coupes in their crosshairs. WIth the Eco-Boost, they’ll be better able to handle another oil-spike.

  • avatar
    Occam

    The original Mustang was also based upon Ford’s cheapest economy car. Using the Pinto is no different than using the Falcon before it. It improved the Mustang, bringing back a compact, light car, and brought it rack & pinion steering and improved suspension. More importantly, it shifted it’s target for competition from the Pony-car corpses littering the junkyards (Javelin, Barracuda, Challenger, AMX) to the new breed of compact sports cars and 2+2s hitting the streets (Z-car, for example, or Celica GT)

    The distaste seems to be as much a distaste for the era it represents (styling that didn’t age well and gutless engines) and the association with the Pinto than the car itself. FOr what it’s worth, the Camaro’s V8’s in 1975 were either 145 or 155 hp, depending on the trim. The Mustang II’s was 140. It’s hard to berate the car for anything other than the failures of its entire era.

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