By on January 15, 2015

U.S. SUV market share chart 2014U.S. sales of SUVs and crossovers grew at twice the rate of the overall industry in 2014 and at nearly three times the rate of the market for all passenger cars, pickup trucks, and vans.

There’s no hiding the fact that many of these SUVs and crossovers are nothing more than cars on stilts. (And some have all but forgotten their stilts.) But consumers have drawn a line between vehicles like the Audi A3 and Audi Q3; between the Ford Escape and Ford Focus; between the Honda Fit and the upcoming Honda HR-V.


• Ten top sellers account four out of every ten utility vehicle sales

• Most all-new utility nameplates come from premium brands


Sales on the car side of the ledger expanded hardly at all in 2014; sales on the utility vehicle side jumped 12%.

Traditional SUVs weren’t left out in the dark. The Jeep Wrangler is America’s ninth-best-selling utility vehicle. Wrangler volume jumped 13% to 175,328 in 2014. Full-size, SUVs based off pickup trucks from General Motors, Ford Motor Company, Toyota, and Nissan combined for a 15% jump to 339,923 U.S. sales in 2014, equal to 6% of the overall utility vehicle market.

Each of the two brands which only sell utility vehicles, Jeep and Land Rover, set calendar year U.S. sales records in 2014. The four top-selling utility vehicle nameplates on sale in America – CR-V, Escape, RAV4, Equinox – reported record-high sales levels, as well as the sixth-ranked Nissan Rogue, ninth-ranked Wrangler; and tenth-ranked Subaru Forester.

Seven new crossover nameplates were introduced to the U.S. market over the course of 2014. Six hailed from premium automakers: the Lincoln MKC, Porsche Macan, Mercedes-Benz GLA, Audi Q3, Lexus NX, and BMW X4. Chevrolet began selling the Trax in December. These seven vehicles generated less than 1% of SUV/crossover market’s 2014 sales, however. The ten major players produced 42.5% of all utility vehicle sales in 2014, up from the 42.1% mark set by a slightly different group of ten a year earlier.

SUVs and crossovers accounted for 32.2% of all new vehicle sales in the United States in 2014, up from 30.4% in 2013 and 29.4% in 2012. With pickup trucks and vans also claiming an increased share, passenger cars paid the price. Car sales increased, but only slightly, and cars formed a smaller portion of the auto industry’s pie: down to 48% from 50% in 2013.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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23 Comments on “America’s SUV/Crossover Share Increased To 32% In 2014...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    People want vehicles that are capable of doing more then traditional sedans or coupes. With average transaction prices being well over $30K this is not an unreasonable request. Why would anyone settle for a sedan when there’s so many multipurpose vehicles available for just a little bit more?

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      We’ve now got CUV, Sedan, Roadster. It’s, IMO, the perfect lineup for “usual people carrier, occasional people carrier/commuter module, fun car.”

      And yeah, guilty of contributing to those numbers since we went sedan –> CUV in late ’14.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        We have a muscle car (of sorts), a minivan and a compact CUV. We also find this a perfect combination.

        The G8 GT is our toy for fun, the CUV is the future Mrs. commuter and small trips for groceries and the like. The minivan is the people hauler, stuff hauler, and we don’t care if it gets dirty and nasty inside vehicle.

        Like you, it is a nice combination. If I ever got rid of the G8, a convertible of some sort would likely take it spot – a convertible with some cajones.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        We have a muscle car (of sorts), a minivan and a compact CUV. We also find this a perfect combination.

        The G8 GT is our toy for fun, the CUV is the future Mrs. commuter and small trips for groceries and the like. The minivan is the people hauler, stuff hauler, and we don’t care if it gets dirty and nasty ins!de vehicle.

        Like you, it is a nice combination. If I ever got rid of the G8, a convertible of some sort would likely take it spot – a convertible with some cajones.

  • avatar
    kovakp

    Potholes. Effing potholes. And slammed roofs on sedans.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      That and those ridiculous huge rims and rock-hard suspensions that only work on race tracks.

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      This!!!!

      I have been so anti SUV/CUV for so many years but finally succumbed and am leasing an X1. The 225/50 tyres means there’s a little more rubber between us and road than is usual on sedans (unless you Camry or base fusion or whatever) and TBH there are bugger all wagons left on sale so if you want 5 doors you have no choice.

      It’s just for my mrs to commute with, family hauling is done by the 9-3 wagon but i tell you what, getting in and out of the X1 is way easier and it’s only raised 4 inches. Especially in winter with jackets and squirming 3 year old and what not, it IS easier than a wagon.

  • avatar
    Timtoolman

    Tall wagons, but they do offer a better view of the road. And ever try and climb out of a Stratus R/T? You’re practically sitting on the ground.

  • avatar

    “Then buses, trucks, vans, semis and motorhomes must drive you frickin’ insane.”

    That was a childish comment. Trucks and other goods vehicles are required, rail is better but cannot always cover the last mile. Buses are far better than cars when it comes to pollution per head. RV’S I agree with you. Unless your the type that believes science is cracked or have your head in the sand you have to believe that the world after 2050 will be a dangerous place, mostly due to global warming. That our generation indulges it’s carbon habit the way it does is nothing short of criminal. And yes, I am a Republican.

  • avatar
    Brick

    Full disclosure, I work in the car industry. I do have a CUV for my wife. But the daily driver is a Volvo V60 WAGON with a stick shift and diesel, unfortunately unavailable in the USA. Toy car is a Miata. My preference is to be close to the ground and drive… Unfortunately, most car buyers today prefer tall tall vehicles with automatics that are less than inspiring to drive.

  • avatar
    bd2

    Depending on size/hatch room – basically either a wagon or hatch on stilts and many don’t really bother with the stilt part.

    Basically reason why Cadillac and VW have struggled the past year – as both have been slow in revamping/expanding their CUV lineups.

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