By on December 30, 2014

13 - 1977 Dodge Aspen Wagon Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinCommonplace as the Dodge Aspen was during the Middle and Late Malaise Era— you saw them on American roads in 1980 or so about as often as you’d see, say, Hyundai Accents today. The Aspen (and its Plymouth sibling, the Volaré) didn’t hold their value so well, and nearly all of them were crushed by the early 1990s. I photograph them whenever I see them, of course, but that isn’t often. In this series before today, we’ve seen this ’76 Aspen sedan, this ’76 Volaré sedan, this brown-on-beige ’77 Volaré coupe and this ’77 Volaré Premier wagon, and now we’ve got a mossy, lichen-covered Northern California Aspen wagon.
07 - 1977 Dodge Aspen Wagon Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe winters in the San Francisco Bay Area are cold and wet, and a car that spends a few years (or maybe a couple of decades) parked in shade will gather moss.
20 - 1977 Dodge Aspen Wagon Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinAnd, much like cars that spend years in the birch forests of northern Sweden, this car has provided a home for lichens.
10 - 1977 Dodge Aspen Wagon Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThink the 318 under the hood is still good? Probably so, but these engines get few takers these days.
06 - 1977 Dodge Aspen Wagon Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinSuch an expanse of brown vinyl!


Better than a Nova? That’s a tough call.

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78 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1977 Dodge Aspen Station Wagon...”


  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    This.

    This, but a 1976 in a darker brown, was my parent’s car when I grew up. When I close my eyes, I can still see the road flashing past the rust holes in the rear floor (“just don’t put your feet there”, my dad would say) and feel the sudden silence when it would stall in quick left turns.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      Us too (brown over brown), but they replaced it with a new ’81 Cutlass Supreme wagon (also brown over brown) before actual holes formed (as far as I knew, I was pretty young, but I do remember the car pretty clearly). Being kind of a car nut as a kid, I knew the Cutlass was a V8, and that was a big deal, so our Aspen must not have been. I also have clear memories of being stuck in KS somewhere late at night sans working transmission. Father was not pleased.

      Does the preponderance of brown wagons in our childhoods have anything to do with our current automotive imagined nirvana?

      • 0 avatar
        Firestorm 500

        Kansas is hard on transmissions. I blew one in a motorhome October 2013 in northwestern Kansas.

        Not much out there but wheat fields and windmills.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Very well put Wilyam, “Does the preponderance of brown wagons in our childhoods have anything to do with our current automotive imagined nirvana?”

        Research has found that our favourite clothing styles and music are those that were popular when we had our first sexual experience.

        So would the fact that so many station wagons were brown (Ford was very strong in wagon sales) and so many of us baby boomers borrowed our parents wagon for dates the reason that so many of us long for a brown station wagon?

        As Candy Clark said in American Grafitti, “I love the feel of tuck and roll upholstery”.

    • 0 avatar

      My parent’s growing up – and probably the car that took me home from the hospital -was a ’78, white with Di-Noc fake woodgrain, and that exact same vinyl interior.

      Looking at those seats makes me remember burning my legs while wearing shorts when the car had been sitting in the sun, in those days before every car came with 90% tint from the factory.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        When I think of vinyl seats, I think of my long deceased Aunt Bertha (insert Bertha joke here) ’83 K-5 Blazer.

        Had the thickest, nastiest vinyl seats that I have ever seen to date. It was damned close to industrial grade plastic.

        To make matters worse, they had this piping which went around the base and left temporary indentions in your skin.

        Of course, the hearing aid beige color didn’t help alleviate matters. Atrocious quality, feel, and appearance.

        Gawd.

        But utilitarian, it was. Served the family for 20 years. Sold to a farm boy which promptly lifted it and used it as a mud truck. It disappeared after that.

  • avatar

    I used to work in the motion picture industry. And anything that was classic seventies, Set Dressing, had to pay through the nose for, nobody kept the stuff. The signature color of the seventies has to be tan. So here you have an Aspen, highly forgettable, in the worst of colors (to our millenium eye), this should be saved. In the UK we had the Austin Allegro, same market, same fake posh design, and even more common than the Aspen, today there are six left. Blink and there will be no more Aspens left.

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    Wasn’t that Al Bundy’s car?

  • avatar
    JohnnyFirebird

    The Aspen coupe in the previous series was kind of good looking on the outside. The interior, though…. oh boy. I think even new they were terrifying and ugly.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Vinyl and a V8. At least somebody knew how to order a family car.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    There’s a guy up the road from my office that has the exact same Volare as the one in the comparison commercial, except he’s mounted some MotorWheel race wheels on it with bigs and littles. He was trying to sell it this past summer/fall, but I suspect the combination of rust around the edges and the high price has relegated it to the far side of the driveway.

    If the price were right, I think I’d go for it. But it’s overpriced right now. It’s a lot of money for a set of wheels, basically.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    When I see a car like this, I always wondered what inspired the owner to keep it for so long. The chances of it ever being worth restoring are approaching zero, there’s no real motivation to keep it.

    Inertia, I guess, it takes effort to get rid of it and none to let it sit, at least until you move.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      I have seen several rural homes and farms with lines of dead cars; I assume they used each one up, dumped it, bought another, and repeated the cycle. I assume eventually the old farmer or owner dies, and they are hauled off for scrap.

      It may be sentimental reasons; it was the family truckster that was going to be restored “one day” only to be sold for scrap imstead.

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        in the rural unincorporated part of the country, which is most of it. you just park it out back and scavenge it for parts,couple decades later you sell it for scrap.

        • 0 avatar
          -Nate

          I *I* still lived in an unincorporated area , Murlee would be there constantly as I’d never sell / give away/ scrap any Motor Vehicle I’ve ever owned…

          My buddy Bobby Odell prolly had 300 + old rigs scatted about his property when he died , it looked like Ma & Pa kettle’s house .

          I loved it .

          -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        In rural areas people sometimes keep a few almost dead cars around to make the farm look more occupied and therefore riskier for criminals. The cars are not insured or registered. They just get moved periodically. Unwanted malaise era cars are great for this because nobody visits trying to buy and restore them. Visible cars that move, lights that change, and large barking dogs discourage thieves from visiting.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I would take a Nova over one of these any day. If you asked me about the Dart/Valiant then it would be a toss up. My aunt and uncle had one of these–76 Plymouth Volare, a horrid car in every aspect. Chrysler products in the late 70’s and early 80’s were about the worst vehicle you could buy with the exception of maybe a Fiat. Now Fiat owns Chrysler but both are now much better.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I too would rather have a Nova but were Aspens really bad ? .

    This thing looks abandoned with the lichen and moss growing on it ~ not badly dented , God knows it’s hard to break a 318 v8 .

    America seems so wasteful to me in this respect .

    Murlee ~ you’re my kinda guy ! Junk Yarding in the rain….

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      I had neighbors that owned a loaded dark-metallic brown Aspen wagon. Theirs wasn’t bad at all, they were actually quite happy with it. I’m not saying these cars didn’t have problems, sure they did, but how many 1970’s cars can you say were bank-vault reliable? I think some of the unreliability stories a lot of people tell about the Aspen/Volare twins could probably be told about many of the brands of that era. The 1970’s weren’t exactly a high note on a lot of things, not just the automotive industry. “Malaise” wasn’t just a car thing.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    All that vinyl.

    Eat your heart out, MB Tex!! Lol

    And I always thought those smooshed little headrests look like hell. Might as well take them out altogether.

    And the lichen… oh be still my ever beating heart. This could be the next big thing, kind of like purposed “weathering” of automotive finishes. :)

  • avatar
    Cadillac Bob
  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Kind of appropriate a Dodge Aspen with lichen and moss. I wonder if a few years in the future there will be a photo of a Chrysler Aspen sitting in a salvage yard with moss and lichen growing on it?

  • avatar
    drylbrg

    My parents had a two door Aspen with the 318, white over red paint and some kind of “sporty” plastic thing over the rear side windows. It was fairly handsome for the era. It was also an unmitigated disaster as a car. My dad always kept cars for the long haul but that piece of garbage was gone in two years. That was his first and only Chrysler product.

  • avatar
    clkimmel

    Did any other maker offer a wagon with a liftback at that time? I only remember the split gates on the Ford and GMs.

    Was the “commercial” made for the dealers to use? It is too long to have been on TV.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I grew up across the street from a guy who had a white Aspen with T-tops. I thought it was kind of cool, Mopar fan as I was at the time.

    As he got older, he drove it less and less, but it seemed to be mechanically sound (and rust free, in NE Ohio, despite being stored outside year-round). It disappeared from the house after he died about 10 years ago.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    Somebody already pulled out the rear seat cushion, looking for spare change.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Did the wagon have the available T-top option, or was that just the 2-door Aspen?

  • avatar
    AlienProbe

    There’s a Aspen Survivor somewhere in Walpole New Hampshire. Some old fellow drives it. I’ve seen him at the grocery store and he seems like a nice chap. I love it when folks cling to a car and get it fixed no matter what. (It’s a blue sedan if I remember correctly)

    On a side note… I had a diecast blue duster (Corgi maybe) when I was a kid. I loved that car. Ran it miles around the house until the wheels were all bent out of shape.

  • avatar
    George B

    My driver’s ed car was a late 70s Dodge Aspen sedan. Memorably bad to drive even by the low standards of the time. Another student executed a turn by spinning the steering wheel like he was playing wheel of fortune. Even though the over boosted power steering allowed this move, the instructor wasn’t amused.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The prior Dart/Valiant was a much better car especially the slant 6’s. The Aspen/Volare were among the worst of the Malaise era cars. A Nova was a decent compact car even with old style springs. Nova’s became popular for customizing and it was easy to drop a bigger V-8 into a Nova than many other compacts. Nova, Chevelle, Monte Carlo, and Impala/Caprice were not bad cars for the time–yes if you are comparing 2014 cars to 1977 then all the Malaise era cars were bad. I you want to point at some disappointing GM cars you need to look no further than the Citation and the rest of the X cars. Rust was always an issue with most Malaise era cars as were stumbling carb engines that were choked up with emission controls and under powered. Aspen/Volare were just not very good and compared to the legendary reliability of the Valiants/Darts were a very big disappointment. The late 70’s Chrysler products undoubtedly led to the bankruptcy of Chrysler. Chrysler did come back.

    • 0 avatar
      chicagoland

      The F body cars [V, A] used the same slant 6, but the bodies were rushed to production and corners cut. Mopar got the last laugh by using the F body for the longer running M body [Diplomat, 5th Ave], which lasted to 1989, and was much more reliable.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        I had a 84 5th Avenue which had been my mother’s car. Overall it was a good car, especially for the 80’s, with a 318 V-8 2 barrel carb. It did suffer from some bad electrics and interior pieces that would fall off but the engine was solid. Chrysler had improved in the 80’s from the quality of this 77 Aspen. The 84 5th Avenue though was not as good as our 2000 Taurus and not as good as any 2014 or 2015 that is the equivalent. I am not a Chrysler fan but I admit that their quality is much better and the takeover by Fiat has been good for Chrysler. I hope we never have a repeat of the Malaise Era of cars–once was enough.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        The late J-bodies (post 1978) were actually very reliable and rust resistant. A friend of mine had a 1980 version for 7 or 8 years and well over 200K miles on it before he just got tired of it. Not bad for a car that everyone else had written off…

        By the time Chrysler got their stuff together and released a greatly improved Volare/Aspen, the damage was done.

    • 0 avatar
      BobinPgh

      The only reason Chrysler came back was to save the jobs – the product really didn’t matter. I read that one of the arguments for letting Chrysler go under was that for 75 years, what had the company done for humanity besides build unreliable gas guzzlers? No, we had to save the jobs because people would be unemployed and bored and go get drunk and riot in the streets! Can’t have that!

    • 0 avatar
      BobinPgh

      One of the arguments for letting Chrysler go under was: What has Chrysler done for humanity for 75 years besides build unreliable gas guzzlers? But as we know, the product doesn’t matter it’s all about saving the jobs. We can’t have workers unemployed, getting drunk and rioting in the streets, we got to keep them busy!

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I don’t understand why you keep going on about Novas, I’ve driven an assortment of vintage cars and the souped up ’77 Nova I got to drive just felt cheap, ratty with bad steering and terrible brakes, and according to the owner it was “police spec”.

      I haven’t driven a Chrysler from the time but I did get to drive a few V6 Mavericks, easily the more solid car, but neither really compare to what you’d get in a VW of the time.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        I drove all of those cars back in the day, I owned a Dart (360 no less!) and a V8 Maverick. Many of my friends had Nova/Phoenix/Omegas also. Of the those three, I would rate the A body Mopars (with torsion bar front suspension) as the best driving cars, not necessarily the best handling. Many of the X cars had rear sway bars which kept them shiny side up, but the A body Mopars were a good ride and handling mix. The worst was my Maverick, no rear sway bar and a 1960’s Falcon era front suspension that was less than stellar. A good ride, but horrible handling.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        I drove all of those cars back in the day. If I had to rank them for drivability, the torsion bar Mopars first, the rear sway bar X body GMs second (barely), the AMC Hornet/Gremlin/Spirit third and the Maverick/Comet last.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    The video makes sure you know about the transverse torsion bar suspension. Anybody have any comment as to whether they were noticeably different from the coil/leaf on GM cars?

    And couldn’t ChryCo torsion suspensions be adjusted for firmness?

    • 0 avatar
      Brian P

      The torsion bars have a fixed spring rate – same situation as coil springs; if you want a different spring rate, you have to replace them with something else. The shocks were normal hydraulic, same as any other car. I’m not sure what the real advantage of torsion bars would be in this situation. Normally, torsion bars are only used if there isn’t enough space for coils, but other manufacturers don’t seem to have had much difficulty finding space for coil springs in the front on rear-drive cars.

      With torsion bars, you can pretty easily adjust the ride height, if you want to.

      All of the older cars had pretty bad suspension geometry by today’s standards. If they had power steering, it was laughably overassisted, as someone else has already mentioned. If they didn’t have power steering, you needed the arms of Hercules to park. But they were all like that.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        Thanks for your reply. I also stumbled into some pretty thorough coverage over at Allpar. It seems that you could change torsion bars for a different spring rate and consequent soft/firm mods but I imagine that seldom happened with the average buyer’s car.

        Front ride height was somewhat adjustable but rear, being leaf springs, wasn’t. Also read about the problems encountered by police fleets with the transverse bars, creeping ride height and resultant whacked steering geometry due to the flexing K-frame.

        Cool how Chrysler developed their own unique (among Big-3) suspension tech and it seemed to handle body roll better than conventional coil/leaf approaches in Ford and Chevy. But if it were radically better I guess everyone would have switched to TBs and stayed with them.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          That the torsion bar Chryslers handled better than the GM or Ford counterparts is an internet myth perpetuated by the Mopar Jihad. Take a look through old car compareson reviews and you’ll find that they were not usually the fastest in the slalom or did they generate the highest G’s on the skid pad. Usually they were 2nd or 3rd out of the three. What little prowess they had was usually at the expense of the ride.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            The photo about midway down this linked page showing a 1960 Chevy, Dodge and Ford cornering at the same speed is a bit impressive:

            http://www.allpar.com/mopar/torsionaire.html

            The Ford’s lean isn’t much worse than the Dodge’s but the Chevy is almost on three wheels. Granted, Allpar isn’t exactly without an agenda but at least in this one instance TBs seem to have some degree of advantage.

  • avatar

    Hard to believe the kit car Aspen did 0 to 60 in 7.3 seconds.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    This would’ve been a nice hot rod with an SRT unit shoved into it, anyone here that wrecked Hellcat Challenger?

    Anyone hope that somebody marries that things enginetransmission with an Aspen wagon?

    Anyone think I’m nuts?

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      No not at all. I dig the old Mopar F-bodies. What would be super cool is to leave the appearance of the wagon the way it is now. Sort of a grunge rest-mod.

      There’s a Facebook page about some guy building a SRT Mirada, basically the same thing you’re describing. But in their case, they’re using the previous SRT motor since this build appears to have been going on for a while…

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I’d leave the body and interior as they are, swap on some cop steelies for better brakes, get an 8-Track and CB in there, get a shifter sticking out of the middle (with an 8 ball) and thats about it.

        On the outside you’d have a worn old wagon, on the inside you have something that will kick every single FWD Rice bucket out there.

        Against a GTR you’ll just spin in your own smoke, but you’ll still look cooler than most GTRs.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I’ve always wanted a Dodge Diplomat with a 408 LA stroker motor, because why not.

  • avatar
    frank908

    I think worst part is that Chrysler raided their interior parts bin from the late 70s right up to the mid-80s. Those are the same color schemes, handles, door latches, speedometer, light switches, etc that they used in the forthcoming minivans that were about to change the course of Chrysler’s fate. I’m proud to say I had the “pleasure” of being carted around in one of those first year minivans in ’84, that my friend’s mom owned; same tan interior, same window cranks, less vinyl, but more tweed fabric.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Chrysler cars were much improved in later years. I had an 84 5th Avenue that was my mother’s car that ran to 200k before I donated it to charity. The engine was the best part of it (318 2bl V-8). Had some electrical issues with it and the interior parts kept falling off–door straps and latches. Overall it was a much better car than this Aspen even though the body was derived from the Volare/Aspen. Our 2000 Taurus which was loaded was a much better car and the leather interior was even better than the 84 Chrysler. Comparing a Malaise Era car with the cars of today is not really fair–cars today though more expensive are much better. Hopefully the Malaise Era of cars does not repeat itself and somethings are better left in the past like shag carpet, pet rocks, avocado, harvest gold, burnt orange, disco, and polyester leisure suits.

  • avatar
    Dodge440391SG

    I’ll just quote Mopar expert, Rick Ehrenberg on this one :

    “Rust to the roof. Suspension geometry from hunger. Frame, chassis, suspension structural failures.Carburetor internals dissolve in gasoline. And about a zillion more TSBs.”

    I’m an old Chrysler fan, but these F-bodies were ridiculous.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    All around for cars a very forgettable era hopefully never to be repeated and the same with much of the music of that era. Death to disco.

  • avatar
    amca

    My friend Jerome used to have a beige Volare sedan he bought from his mother’s cleaning lady. He kept the plastic Madonna on the dash.

    We used to call Jerome “The Nutty Federal Agent” when he drove that car.

  • avatar

    It was a much better car than this Aspen even though the body was derived from the Volare/Aspen. Our 2000 Taurus which was loaded was a much better car and the leather interior was even better than the 84 Chrysler.

  • avatar

    Our family had a silver Aspen wagon for about a decade until the transmission went bad. As a kid I thought it was the height of luxury. It certainly looked luxurious when compared to my father’s dart. These cars sold relatively well since the competition back then was not that great. The Aspen as among the last of the old tech Detroit sedans that did not implement modern technologies like engine control units. The K-car in this respect was a huge leap forward in technology. In retrospect it is amazing how primitive cars from the 70s really were.

  • avatar

    Somebody here took a knock at Disco. Compared to the current music scene Disco sounds great, unless you think the noise that Tyler Swift produces counts as music. Gene Simmons is right popular music today is dead. Don’t compare lousy cars of the 70s to the great music put out at the time by Billy Joel, Elton John, Led Zeppelin, and Eagles. I can name a dozen other singers and bands better than anything that has come out in the last thirty years.

    Cars are great today, but music and movies are utter junk. There is a reason we are still talking about the Godfather movies today. On the music front many kids today are still listening to Zeppelin.

    In short don’t judge the 70s as a whole by junky cars produced at the time.

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      Agreed. And not every 70’s car was bad. Our A/B and C-body GM’s that parents, friends and relatives owned were well above average vehicles that gave many trouble free miles as long as one avoided the diesels and 200 Metric transmissions.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    These were way better than a Nova in every respect except quality, which is saying something. My guess is this one held together pretty well for whatever reason, had drivers for many years with minimal needs and was left to molder for a few years after that.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    If you say a lie often enough, people will believe it. The torsion bar suspension did not make the Aspen/Volare better than the GM cars.

    The mid/late 70s enthusiast magazines, as well as Consumer Reports, all felt the GM compacts were the best handling of the era(malaise era).

    The GM cars were also the best assembled and most reliable. A 78 or later Aspen/Volare was a credible car in terms of reliability, but the reputation had been damaged.

  • avatar
    macmcmacmac

    I remember three Aspens during my lifetime. The first was a carbon-copy of the yellow two door coupe in the film. My sister won it in a raffle, first year 1976 model. I still remember her and a couple of other family members jumping for joy in the kitchen as her name was announced, and my aunt excitedly phoning us up with the news. I remember even in my innocent pre-teen years being surprised at the amount of rust on the rear springs and differential that had already taken root before she had even taken delivery of the car. When she sold it a few years later, the rust through on the fenders was already signaling it’s life was more than half over. My father, never a Chrysler fan, warned her about keeping a spare ballast resistor in the glovebox, and it was certainly needed more than a few times. She bought a Malibu to replace it.

    My own Aspen ownership occurred in 1993, when as a skint jack of all trades wrench starting out in a new province, I purchased a horrible brown on brown sedan, with sun split vinyl roof, seats and dash, along with the de-rigeur Alberta winter-cracked windshield. It was entertaining to drive for the first few miles while the engine warmed up. Pressing the gas pedal felt like standing on a balloon, as the engine revs bogged and the carb spit back through the air cleaner. I knew something was amiss when I saw the speedometer falling while coasting down a hill. Touching the left front rim betrayed the existence of a seized caliper, $19 from your friendly local autoparts store. Acceleration was glacial, even by my low standards, and it was an act of faith to pull out for a pass. I estimate I was putting down about 40hp to the road. With the 5 digit odo, it was impossible to tell how many miles was on the slant-six, but as it spun over and fired up every time, no matter how cold it got, my brother in law opined that I could “slide a dime” between the piston and cylinder wall. This annoyed the sister of my sister in law to no end, as her Nissan mini van had spent an entire week immobilized by the cold. It was at it’s worst in winter though. The lack of a defroster grid at -40C was downright dangerous. I actually found a kit at Crappy Tire to install one, and it worked…too well, as I had miswired it to be on when the key was off, leading to an almost blistered hand as I showed my brother my handiwork one summer’s evening. It also had a weird habit of blowing the horn when I passed the key through the “accessories” position, but was otherwise mute whenever I actually tried to use it while driving. My attempts to fix it were met with no success and some rather unpleasant tingling through the fingers. Eventually, it all became too much. It got stuck on a whim in the lightest snowfall, leading to a rather nasty dent in the front fender when I whacked it with a shovel out of frustration. The windshield was almost opaque after punching it rather viciously one night coming home from work in the cold and dark from a job I truly, truly despised. It’s denouement occurred on a similar night, when I just couldn’t hack the back-spitting through the carb as I made my way home from my latest dead-end job. I put it in neutral, floored the engine, and dumped it in drive. An almighty whack came out of the rear end, and I used to lose all drive whenever I took a left turn from then on. Whenever I was forced to turn left, I immediately had to weave right again to retrieve forward momentum. I finally dumped it off on a guy who picked it up for free. It was absolute crap, but always worked, and even when it needed a repairs, they were cheap and easy. A new starter motor was in in about 15 minutes, and cost $65.

    The last Aspen I saw was my buddy’s 1980 black coupe, into which he had shoehorned a hi-comp 440 built up to some hi-perf 1968 spec output using parts retrieved from the local pick-your-part. That thing would ruble your gut with its open headers. He lived and breathed Mopar. he was a bit of a case, living in a stand alone garage next to his car and motorcycle on a roll-out cot. I never really knew how he supported himself, but he was happy all the time. I remember him E-Baying a steering wheel he found at the scrap yard for $700 once. Tuffy? Toughie? It was at least 15 years ago now.

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