By on December 7, 2014

2014 JEep CherokeeIf ever there was a month to highlight the popularity of America’s best-selling SUVs and crossovers, November 2014 is it. The Honda CR-V, the top-ranked utility vehicle in each of the last three months, didn’t just outsell all SUV and crossover nameplates, it outsold all passenger car nameplates, as well.

CR-V sales improved by 8869 units as the four cars which sold more often one year ago – Camry, Accord, Civic, Altima – all registered fewer sales this November than last, combining for 8359 fewer total sales. During a month in which passenger car sales held steady, utility vehicle sales jumped 9.5%.

The CR-V was by no means the only popular utility vehicle to post major gains in November 2014. All of the ten top sellers shown here (indeed, all 14 top-selling SUVs and crossovers) reported increased volume, year-over-year. The second-ranked Ford Escape was up 22%. Jeep’s Cherokee, still new at this time a year ago, was up 67% in November 2014. Nissan Rogue volume jumped 44%.

Rank
SUV/Crossover
Nov.
2014
Nov.
2013
%
Change
11 mos.
2014
11 mos.
2013
%
Change
#1
 Honda CR-V 32,378 23,509 37.7% 302,650 275,145 10.0%
#2
 Ford Escape 25,528 20,988 21.6% 280,609 271,531 3.3%
#3
 Toyota RAV4  21,108 19,447 8.5% 244,701 197,279 24.0%
#4
 Chevrolet Equinox  18,536 18,397 0.8% 220,944 220,980 -0.02%
#5
 Jeep Cherokee  16,945 10,169 66.6% 160,793 10,748 1,396%
#6
 Ford Explorer  16,382 14,268 14.8% 191,530 175,490 9.1%
#7
 Jeep Grand Cherokee  15,307 14,798 3.4% 166,610 157,758 5.6%
#8
 Nissan Rogue  15,067 10,487 43.7% 184,320 148,075 24.5%
#9
 Subaru Forester 13,879 13,410 3.5% 144,790 110,363 31.2%
#10
 Jeep Wrangler  13,592 11,753 15.6% 161,325 143,474 12.4%

For this KL Cherokee, November’s fifth-place result was its best finish since arriving in North America more than a year ago. This was also the third consecutive month in which the Cherokee was Jeep’s best-selling model. For the ninth consecutive month, there were three Jeeps in the top ten.

After sitting in the tenth spot in each of the previous six months, the Subaru Forester’s move up to ninth came as year-over-year volume increased 3.5%. The Forester is Subaru’s best-selling model through the first 11 months of 2014, but not in November. For those who see the Outback as an SUV of some kind and not a wagon, its 14,128 November sales would have placed it ninth, knocking the Forester down to the tenth spot. Perhaps the Outback is simply the true crossover, capable of competing in one category or another, not unlike Kemba Walker’s ability to cross over to the right, then the left, then the right, before pulling up and nailing the three.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

72 Comments on “America’s 10 Best-Selling SUVs & Crossovers In November 2014...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I’m really surprised that the Hyundai Santa Fe didn’t make the list, I see an awful lot of them

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Santa Fe (Hyundai reports both short and long wheelbase versions as one) ranked 12th in Nov.; 13th YTD.

      • 0 avatar
        rockets

        I see a lot more CX-5s on the road than Foresters; where do they rank?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Linking to your complete list is far more interesting

        #1 Honda CR-V 302,650 275,145 10.0% 32,378 23,509 37.7%
        #2 Ford Escape 280,609 271,531 3.3% 25,528 20,988 21.6%
        #3 Toyota RAV4 244,701 197,279 24.0% 21,108 19,447 8.5%
        #4 Chevrolet Equinox 220,944 220,980 -0.1% 18,536 18,397 0.8%
        #5 Ford Explorer 191,530 175,490 9.1% 16,382 14,268 14.8%
        #5.1 Ford Explorer * 172,707 162,651 6.2% 14,949 13,220 13.1%
        #5.2 Ford Explorer Police Interceptor * 18,823 12,839 46.6% 1,433 1,048 36.7%
        #6 Nissan Rogue 184,320 148,075 24.5% 15,067 10,487 43.7%
        #7 Jeep Grand Cherokee 166,610 157,758 5.6% 15,307 14,798 3.4%
        #8 Jeep Wrangler 161,325 143,474 12.4% 13,592 11,753 15.6%
        #9 Jeep Cherokee 160,793 10,748 1,396% 16,945 10,169 66.6%
        #10 Subaru Forester 144,790 110,363 31.2% 13,879 13,410 3.5%
        #11 Toyota Highlander 131,108 115,228 13.8% 13,476 11,544 16.7%
        #12 Ford Edge 100,924 117,031 -13.8% 7,648 8,761 -12.7%
        #13 Hyundai Santa Fe 97,511 80,595 21.0% 9,787 9,657 1.3%
        #14 Honda Pilot 97,378 117,707 -17.3% 9,228 8,150 13.2%
        #15 Chevrolet Traverse 95,289 88,665 7.5% 7,836 6,889 13.7%
        #16 GMC Terrain 93,984 91,527 2.7% 7,737 6,821 13.4%
        #17 Lexus RX 93,865 90,751 3.4% 9,592 9,493 1.0%
        #18 Kia Sorento 92,832 98,167 -5.4% 8,598 8,645 -0.5%
        #19 Mazda CX-5 91,401 72,823 25.5% 7,220 6,323 14.2%
        #20 Chevrolet Tahoe 86,467 74,856 15.5% 8,027 7,272 10.4%
        #21 Dodge Journey 85,151 76,317 11.6% 7,530 5,155 46.1%
        #22 Jeep Patriot 84,028 69,639 20.7% 7,546 5,148 46.6%
        #23 GMC Acadia 76,649 81,870 -6.4% 6,408 7,566 -15.3%
        #24 Nissan Pathfinder 72,322 81,957 -11.8% 6,231 6,801 -8.4%
        #25 Toyota 4Runner 68,762 46,525 47.8% 7,180 4,681 53.4%
        #26 Acura MDX 58,842 46,502 26.5% 5,210 6,091 -14.5%
        #27 Dodge Durango 58,279 55,351 5.3% 5,413 5,581 -3.0%
        #28 Jeep Compass 56,318 49,459 13.9% 4,099 3,547 15.6%
        #29 Buick Enclave 54,907 55,715 -1.5% 4,259 4,687 -9.1%
        #30 Cadillac SRX 48,679 50,702 -4.0% 3,331 4,823 -30.9%
        #31 Chevrolet Suburban 48,248 45,440 6.2% 5,045 5,212 -3.2%
        #32 Buick Encore 45,790 29,195 56.8% 4,577 2,663 71.9%
        #33 Hyundai Tucson 44,192 38,192 15.7% 3,642 3,285 10.9%
        #34 Nissan Murano 42,934 40,000 7.3% 3,840 5,720 -32.9%
        #35 Mercedes-Benz M-Class 41,101 36,841 11.6% 5,190 4,328 19.9%
        #36 BMW X5 40,933 37,865 8.1% 4,557 4,445 2.5%
        #37 Ford Expedition 40,393 34,025 18.7% 3,982 3,492 14.0%
        #38 Acura RDX 39,709 40,535 -2.0% 3,436 3,663 -6.2%
        #39 Kia Sportage 39,647 30,438 30.3% 3,261 4,693 -30.5%
        #40 Audi Q5 37,869 35,561 6.5% 4,184 3,582 16.8%
        #41 GMC Yukon 36,840 24,705 49.1% 3,179 2,777 14.5%
        #42 Nissan Juke 36,029 35,081 2.7% 2,008 3,446 -41.7%
        #43 Chevrolet Captiva Sport 35,353 44,966 -21.4% 78 4,476 -98.3%
        #44 Mercedes-Benz GLK-Class 33,143 29,324 13.0% 2,326 3,344 -30.4%
        #45 BMW X3 31,029 26,916 15.3% 2,221 4,032 -44.9%
        #46 Mitsubishi Outlander Sport 28,299 22,593 25.3% 2,679 2,059 30.1%
        #47 Infiniti QX60/JX 27,825 27,858 -0.1% 2,927 3,015 -2.9%
        #48 Cadillac Escalade ^ 26,729 18,297 46.1% 3,234 1,751 84.7%
        #48.1 Cadillac Escalade * 17,201 11,122 54.7% 2,106 1,100 91.5%
        #48.2 Cadillac Escalade ESV * 9,528 7,175 32.8% 1,128 651 73.3%
        #49 GMC Yukon XL 26,492 28,100 -5.7% 2,416 2,665 -9.3%
        #50 Mercedes-Benz GL-Class 23,203 27,673 -16.2% 3,065 2,926 4.8%
        #51 Volkswagen Tiguan 23,005 27,538 -16.5% 2,082 2,235 -6.8%
        #52 Lincoln MKX 22,326 21,366 4.5% 1,602 1,946 -17.7%
        #53 Ford Flex 22,036 23,575 -6.5% 1,803 2,125 -15.2%
        #54 Mini Countryman 20,704 19,270 7.4% 1,545 1,435 7.7%
        #55 BMW X1 20,217 23,771 -15.0% 2,416 2,364 2.2%
        #56 Lexus GX460 19,978 10,306 93.8% 2,043 1,703 20.0%
        #57 Volvo XC60 17,197 18,185 -5.4% 1,643 1,500 9.5%
        #58 Mazda CX-9 16,747 23,089 -27.5% 1,437 1,306 10.0%
        #59 Audi Q7 16,589 13,699 21.1% 1,746 1,524 14.6%
        #60 Land Rover Range Rover Sport 15,861 13,671 16.0% 1,152 1,421 -18.9%
        #61 Nissan Xterra 15,368 16,178 -5.0% 1,087 1,445 -24.8%
        #62 Porsche Cayenne 15,271 17,128 -10.8% 1,619 1,546 4.7%
        #63 Toyota FJ Cruiser 14,316 11,826 21.1% 714 1,150 -37.9%
        #64 Mitsubishi Outlander 11,972 10,998 8.9% 1,014 1,399 -27.5%
        #65 Land Rover Range Rover 11,348 10,881 4.3% 1,021 1,292 -21.0%
        #66 Infiniti QX80/QX56 11,320 11,398 -0.7% 1,319 1,243 6.1%
        #67 Nissan Armada 11,232 12,920 -13.1% 1,224 1,260 -2.9%
        #68 Land Rover Range Rover Evoque 11,014 10,219 7.8% 1,037 1,091 -4.9%
        #69 Lincoln MKC 10,767 — — 2,152 — —
        #70 Toyota Sequoia 10,545 12,429 -15.2% 970 1,201 -19.2%
        #71 Lincoln Navigator 8,641 7,671 12.6% 1,433 762 88.1%
        #72 Porsche Macan 6,377 — — 987 — —
        #73 Volkswagen Touareg 6,356 7,415 -14.3% 578 570 1.4%
        #74 Mercedes-Benz GLA-Class 4,810 — — 1,812 — —
        #75 Infiniti QX70/FX 4,765 5,794 -17.8% 414 547 -24.3%
        #76 Lincoln MKT 4,444 5,416 -17.9% 381 431 -11.6%
        #77 Land Rover LR4 3,943 6,545 -39.8% 313 493 -36.5%
        #78 Volvo XC90 3,884 6,157 -36.9% 87 504 -82.7%
        #79 Lexus LX570 3,547 3,950 -10.2% 425 514 -17.3%
        #80 Land Rover LR2 3,545 2,930 21.0% 121 304 -60.2%
        #81 BMW X6 3,438 4,827 -28.8% 421 496 -15.1%
        #82 Toyota Land Cruiser 2,793 2,756 1.3% 320 276 15.9%
        #83 Audi Q3 2,753 — — 735 – —
        #84 Mercedes-Benz G-Class 2,715 2,295 18.3% 294 223 31.8%
        #85 Infiniti QX50/EX 2,503 1,869 33.9% 195 281 -30.6%
        #86 Mini Paceman 1,953 2,612 -25.2% 271 631 -57.1%
        #87 BMW X4 1,889 — — 489 – —
        #88 Subaru Tribeca 693 1,455 -52.4% – 107 -100%
        #89 Acura ZDX 76 347 -78.1% 3 10 -70.0%
        #90 Lexus NX 22 — — 22 — —
        #91 Hyundai Veracruz 1 175 -99.4% — — —
        #92 Jeep Liberty — 6,101 -100% — — —
        #93 Suzuki Grand Vitara — 1,037 -100% — — —
        #94 Mitsubishi Endeavor — 24 -100% — — —
        #95 Mazda Tribute — 3 -100% — — —
        #96 Honda Element — 2 -100% — — —

        Total
        4,815,687 4,303,663 11.9% 439,852 401,770 9.5%

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Numbersnumbersnumbersnumbersnumbersnumbersnumbersnumbersnumbers…

        • 0 avatar
          dolorean

          Lie2me, sadly your listing provides the distillation of what’s wrong with America in my opinion. Give me a razor sharp 2×2 coupe or a long-slung luxury Interstate cruiser over the aerodynamic bricks SUVs that inhabit ‘Burbia. My garage would house a Lincoln Signature Townie on its last year of making and a Mustang GT with track package and Coyote V8 for the weekends (notwithstanding the Subie Brat that I would stand in as the wintermobile, replacing the Rust-O-Matic body with something more along the magical).

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Oh, sure take that 2+2 razor sharp coupe to Costco and see how many Bounty 30-packs you can get in it. Practicality rules. 5 million SUV/CUVs can’t be wrong

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          I’m just stunned that there’s 96 of these things. How many good performance cars? I don’t have the time to make a list but I bet it’s not even 25% of that.

          About the only good thing is I’m not tempted to buy a new car to replace my ’11 GTI, so the CUV craze will save me some money. I’ll just drive it until the wheels fall off, and then buy a used low mileage pre-CUV driver’s car to replace it.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      West of Houston in a rural area it’s mostly the Chevy Equinox that I see. Still a lot of CRV and the new Jeep is spotted more often.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    It would be interesting to see a complete list but with the sheer # of SUVs/CUVs on the market that list would pretty long.

    What is amazing is how many % some of them are up in sales.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Can’t beat Vox Populi. Squashy cars are SO dead.

  • avatar
    Joss

    I know it’s like going back to the Bonnie & Clyde days tall and boxy is in. Perhaps it’s the contagion of not wanting to sit below the popular beltline or the demographics of an aging population.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      Yep, it’s yesterday once more. A Ford Escape is within inches of a 1940 Ford Woody, while the EcoSport is very close to a Model A.

      The two influnences that caused cars to become lower and longer in the mid-1950s was the jet age and the appearance of fighters like the F-100 Super Saber (same for tail fins and wrap around windshields); and the better handling that came from making cars lower and wider.

      Cars are more of an appliance now than they used to be; but that being said; today’s crop of SUVs and CUVs accelerate and handle very well; better than many of the sports cars and personal luxury cars of the past. Electronic stability systems and ABS keep them on four wheels better than ever. They are also better outfitted with simple things like vents, outlets, and cupholders in the back. (We rented a Chrysler 200 last week, and was surpised to find no vents at all for the back seat.)

      An aging population and wanting to be head and shoulders with the crowd is part of it; the main thing is that people have gotten over wanting their cars low and long; and now prefer tall and short instead. Like hairstyles and dress lengths, tastes have changed.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Station wagon volumes peaked in the early 60s, thanks to the Ford Econoline, which spawned domestic imitators.

        The Japanese gained ground in the US with compact pickups, marketing them as lifestyle vehicles.

        Both of those trends converged into the Chrysler minivan, which then set the stage for the family SUV (the Ford Explorer offered a car-like interior, which was pitched successfully to suburban women) and the CUV (the RAV4).

        All of that paved the way for the luxury CUV, such as the Lexus RX, which has since been copied by the Germans.

        It’s a trend that has been five decades in the making. But like the proverbial frog in boiling water, the trend was missed by the average car enthusiast, even though the shift has been underway for quite some time.

  • avatar
    EAF

    I’d be interested in seeing a demographic map. Every where I turn (NYC) I run into either a Tahoe or a Cherokee, it’s insane. I’ve yet to see a Rav4 or Equinox.

  • avatar
    EMedPA

    This tracks with what I see in upstate NY: Escapes and CRV’s are everywhere.

    • 0 avatar
      anti121hero

      I agree. Crvs are so bland I don’t notice them though. However, the new cherokees are so butt ugly I can’t help but notice it every time I see one.

      • 0 avatar
        EMedPA

        Yeah, they’re an acquired taste. One that I have yet to acquire.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I think the front end may be either acquired or… Something… I haven’t got a clue what’s to like. But the rear, that’s one hideous rear end.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I wanted to like the Cherokee, I really did being a Jeep fan from way back, but the more I see them the less I like them. I have higher expectations for the Renegade

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It wasn’t a secret I didn’t like it from the beginning, but I apparently only noticed the front end in the prerelease pictures; however the rear end is possibly worse than the front to look at.
            Note: I said possibly.

            I knew it would sell all along, look at the rest of its competition, boring invisible vehicles, this being slightly different, making the Starbucks-iPhone-falling into water fountain crowd look adventurous when their pulled to the side of the road after texting and wrecking.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            It’s no secret I didn’t like it from the beginning but apparently in the preproduction pictures I only paid attention to the front view, now that it’s out I can say that the rear end is possibly the bigger eyesore.
            Note: I said possibly

            Granted, I knew it would sell all along, the Starbucks-iPhone-falling into fountain crowd want to look adventurous when their pulled to the side of the road after texting and wrecking.

            2nd attempt at writing this…

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Alright I’m going to try and write this a third time then I’m done.
            It’s no secret I wasn’t a fan of the Cherokee from the beginning but apparently I was only looking at the front end in the preproduction pictures, the rear end is quite possibly worse than the front end to look at.
            Note: I said possibly.

            Granted I knew all along the thing would sell to the Starbucks-iPhone-falling into water fountain crowd. They have to look adventurous while their pulled to the side of the road after texting and wrecking.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Derek, it says it’s in the spam filter, just noticed I used the word “s*de”.

  • avatar

    I’m amazed by the lasting power of the Equinox (similar to the Cruze in that respect). Good cars, but unchanged (I mean, has the Equinox even had a substantial refresh?) in at least 4 years.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      You would see more Equinox if there was an option for duel climate control. Dealerships state it’s one of main reasons they cannot sell.more of them. And is the only reason my wife and I don’t own one.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Funny, my 08 Grand Prix has this option but lacks traction control (which I imagine the Equinox has).

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        Equinox sell like discount crack up here where we routinely get 120⁰ temp variation between winter & summer. Truly, if I never saw another one I’d know I was in a parallel universe.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        GMs strange on the multi setting climate control vehicles.

        Dad used to have a regular cab short bed GMT800 that had dual zone climate, the truck had manual windows/locks but did have cruise control, but the dual zone climate was completely unnecessary. Both my H3 and H3T however have a single entire cabin as the only option, sure it’s a midsize, but there still more volume to cool/heat.
        I guess GM tends to save it for the fullsize vehicles only? Can’t remember what the terrain rental I drove had, thing was such a POS I really didn’t care to notice apparently.

        • 0 avatar

          Dual-Zone is on the Verano. It was also on many Centuries and Regals, the LeSabre, even base W-Impalas. Same deal with automatic headlamps – weird distribution.

          • 0 avatar
            MrGreenMan

            I am convinced they take the options away for a while to have something to say when they offer them back.

            Case in point:

            They ran a lot of ads around here for the 2013 Buick lineup, with MyBuick remote start. They crowed an awful lot about how all Buick cars had remote starters.

            This greatly confused me. Having sampled several mid-oughts Impalas, a ’06 Chevy Malibu, an ’08 Chevy Malibu, etc – I thought the entire Chevy line had this feature back then.

            So, why was it suddenly something to tout as new, if not a cynical trick to take them away then offer them back later?

  • avatar
    ExPatBrit

    Considering what the Wrangler is, top ten is amazing.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Not really. Not all Wranglers sold are bare-bones rock crawlers. Many of the Wranglers in my area are 4-door Hardtops with all the options, and pretty plush.

      One young man at the nearby Air Force base has a Sahara that topped out at >$35K. He traded a four year old BMW 3-series he brought back from Germany.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        The numerical majority of Wranglers sold today are 4-doors with hardtops. Most of them are used for tasks that a CUV would be better suited for. If you’re a fan of Wranglers for off-road use, that’s still a good thing. It generates sales volume that justifies offering Wranglers at all. Hopefully, Fiat won’t read the sales numbers to determine that a cheaper, shared platform will accommodate the meat of volume more profitably.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          The Wrangler is a “lifestyle” vehicle, an image the driver wishes to project.

          The fact that in spite of that it still sells well for a niche vehicle, is a plus.

          But in today’s automotive world, it would not surprise me if Fiatsler messes with this good thing.

          Ford decided to mess with the best-selling pickup truck by substituting aluminum panels for the steel ones.

          It remains to be seen how well that will work out. Time will tell.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Ford doesn’t have any choice. Obama’s CAFE means that their franchise vehicle is going from low cost, high margin to high cost, low margin. Management needs to find a way to keep it compliant until their golden parachutes are deployed.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ford could also use its lobbying and Congressional purchases to gridlock (or change) the whole darn system. Election coming up soon and all, and a certain anti-business party lost out big this time around.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I’m seeing a little Aztec in the Cherokee from that angle.

  • avatar

    Harley Earl is spinning in his grave.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Encore finally sent him into spin cycle.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I was gonna say Brooks Stevens, but I figure it would be a bit conflicting.
      On one hand he designed the Wagoneer, which is timeless and still highly sought after. (Since I have Jeep on my mind – the above embarrasing Cherokee in question)

      On the other hand he is associated with planned obselance, so he would be extremely happy about the Cherokee above, as well as the other crossovers on that list.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      “My primary purpose for twenty-eight years has been to lengthen and lower the American automobile, at times in reality and always at least in appearance.”

      -Harley Earl

      Not to play the apostate (sounds too much like prostate), but WHY THE EFF WAS THAT EVER A GOOD IDEA?!

      Bes1des, even at his worst (’59s) Earl gave you some damned windows to see out of. He was not a ghoulish modern regulator attempting to break our will and herd us into blind autonomous pods.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Right out of the dealer the Trailhawk Row of Urinals rides like noisy, thunky crap on our frost-heaved and patched roads. Given Chrysler’s build quality, you know it’ll be a rattle-trap as quick as a Yugo.

    This does not bode well for the Renegade.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Not that we 60 plus year olds have changed our tastes in cars, rather the cars have changed. Tree trunk sized A pillars, Euro design hood crush zones, raised belt lines and ever rising rear decks all contribute to wretched outward vision. At least I can see out of an SUV or CUV. Went new car shopping last week. I have tried Fusion, ES 350, Accord, Camry, Optima, Sonata ……all were claustrophobic cabins.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      And to back that up, I recall the good old days of piloting my parents huge Country Squire around when I got my license…

      Longer, lower and wider were all hallmarks of the 50s-60s-70s. Sorry but a CUV just makes much more sense all the way around, even casting a smaller shadow then an equally-volume sized car.

      These are the good old days…..

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Of the top 50, only 6 of them can be had with a clutch. The end is near.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    Equinox-Terrain combo is still doing serious volume

    CRV/HRV combo are going to be a brand unto themselves. Some serious volume is going to be done between those two.

  • avatar
    marjanmm

    How do you even drive a regular car in US with all those tall vehicles everywhere around you blocking the view?

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      We never drive for pleasure any more and for necessary commuting we join The Tall Wars. That’s pretty much the theme of this article.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      You must get the periscope option, otherwise it’s bumpers and wheel covers for you my good man

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        *Sigh* Wheel covers. On steelies.

        Big round chromey wheel covers.. with bullety centers and emerald-red translucent inserts around them. Little chrome spokes emanating from the center assemblies, maybe spinner flanges. All in chrome thicker than any Harley’s.

        Like I died and went to 1958.

  • avatar
    GS 455

    When I come up to a red light with 3 cars in one lane and a single Honda CRV in the other I’ll go behind the other 3 vehicles because more often then not they’ll all go faster than the CRV driver.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      We do tend to be nicer and more intelligent. And we believe in leaving early to get somewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Yeah, weird

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          What… YOU haven’t ever wanted to live in a Grant Wood painting?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’d prefer a Renoir or Monet, but I know I would keep bumping into things because of how blurry everything would be.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Not the ones featuring slow people in CR-Vs who leave early to go every where…

            .

            Do you know why everyone in Wisconsin drives so slow? Because, they’ve got no place to go and all day to get there

            Well, there is my one favorite…

            http://maryckhayes.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/the-simpsons-american-gothic-30808.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            @28,

            Yeah, Renior, Monet, Manet.. none of them guys could see straight. It’s too bad the photo term “bokeh” wasn’t around then ’cause those dudes made a career of it.

            @Lie2me

            You’re just in denial over the Renegade. Turns a man mean.

      • 0 avatar
        GS 455

        @Pete since you are a member of the BB I know that you drive with intelligence and purpose but the average CRV user drives with the comportment of the figure in Munch’s “The Scream”.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The CUV is now the default car shape, and will just continue taking over more and more of the market. Sedans are vaguely old-fashioned and will just become more so. Hatchbacks will converge into CUVs. SUVs with real off-road capability (and the compromises it requires) will again be specialty vehicles.

    The market has spoken and it would rather sit up high than have good driving dynamics.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Carve your last sentence into stone. Do it real pretty and I’ll buy one.

      For the first time since “Longer, Lower, Wider, the ’49 Hudson is the Car for You!” Americans en masse have broken free of that idiotic and physically painful trend. Gone is the power of totalitarian marketing.

      Bipeds Unite! No More Crawlspace On Wheels! What rural folk with their pickups have always quietly known is finally bursting into the consciousness of everyone else: Longer, Lower, Wider was a commie plot second only to infiltrating Los Alamos.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      True they are 6 development years apart, but with the exception of missing turbo thrust, my Outback’s driving dynamics are hugely similar to my Saab 9-3 Aero. Even better in the rain and pulling into a parking lot with any type of driveway incline.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Lou_BC: @Arthur- TPMS is not a legal requirement in Canada. Somr dealerships and tire shops will try to tell you they...
  • jkross22: Electricity sold at retail…. What? You don’t see your home as a retail customer of the power...
  • Sobro: Burn.
  • Mike-NB2: came here to say this same thing about the missing Nokians.
  • mopar4wd: It does depend on where you live. With the current increase in gas electric is cheaper again, where I live,...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber