By on November 14, 2014

Nissan Sentra - 4. Picture courtesy NissanIn the steadily growing U.S. new vehicle market, car sales have increased just 1% through the first ten months of 2014.

Nissan, however, says their car sales have grown 15.5% in 2014, surging forward by more than 90,000 units to 669,538.

In calendar year 2013, total new vehicle sales were up nearly 8%, but car sales grew just 4% during a year in which, for example, pickup trucks were up 12%.

2014 hasn’t been so kind to cars, with the Chrysler Group’s passenger cars collectively falling 15%, Ford Motor Company car sales sliding 4%, GM cars up less than 2%, American Honda car sales up less than 1%, Hyundai car sales down 3%, total Toyota/Lexus/Scion cars up just 1%, and the Volkswagen brand’s cars down 12%.

According to Automotive News, in an industry that’s expanded by 720,125 units, total new passenger car sales are up by fewer than 77,000 units. Cars accounted for 50.6% of all new vehicle sales in the first ten months of 2013; just 48.5% in 2014.

That approximate 49% mark isn’t an unusual one for the auto industry in the United States. Americans are expected to register more than 16 million new vehicles in 2014, the first such 16K+ year since 2007, a year in which 48.8% of the new vehicles sold were passenger cars, down from 49.1%.

But Nissan is a much different seller of cars now than they were in 2007, when they sold 542,258 cars in the full calendar year, a figure which they eclipsed in the first eight months of 2014. (Nissan’s car division in 2007 was made up of a Z, Altima, Maxima, Sentra, and Versa. In addition to those five cars, Nissan now also lists the Cube, GT-R, Juke, and Leaf among their cars.)

Setting aside the historical significance, though, just look at Nissan’s current car performance, excluding the Juke for relatively obvious reasons. The brand’s car sales are thus up 16% to 635,517 units. 44% of that volume comes from the Altima, America’s fourth-best-selling car overall and third-best-selling midsize car. The Altima competes in a stagnant segment, but sales of this intermediate Nissan are up 3.4% in 2014. The brand’s two core small car nameplates, Versa (which includes the Note in Nissan’s release) and Sentra, combine to sell about as often as the Altima, generating another 43% of the brand’s car volume.

The Versa, up 21% in 2014, is America’s leading subcompact. Sentra sales are up 44% in a competitive set that’s risen around 3% this year. The Leaf is Nissan’s fourth-best-selling car. Sales are up 35% to 24,411 units, making the Leaf America’s 66th-best-selling car in 2014, just behind the Hyundai Veloster; just ahead of the Ford C-Max. This leaves less than 2% of the brand’s car volume for the 370Z (up 13%), Cube (down 28%), and GT-R (up 9%), and another 7% for the Maxima.

Sales of the Maxima are up 9% in this run-out-the-clock year, a real rarity in a declining category of big, volume-brand cars. The Maxima sells slightly more often than the Buick LaCrosse; slightly less often than the Chrysler 300.

These car nameplates have generated 59% of the Nissan brand’s year-to-date sales, up from 58% last year. Fortunately for Nissan, the Frontier, Juke, Murano, NV, NV200, and especially the Rogue have produced significant improvements, as well. Those vehicles, along with the declining Armada, Pathfinder, Quest, Titan, and Xterra, are up 11% to 436,947 units this year. Total Infiniti sales are up 4% to 93,925, 8% of the overall company’s volume.

And where does the Nissan brand rank in the grand scheme of automakers competing for passenger car sales in America this year? Automotive News says the Toyota brand leads the way, followed by Chevrolet, Honda, and then Nissan, which is nearly 17,000 sales ahead of FoMoCo’s Ford division. Of course, Ford has managed to sell 620,447 F-Series pickups this year, a massive figure which once again puts the car market into perspective.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

96 Comments on “Nissan Defies Trends, Keeps Selling More Cars In America...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Its no surprise the Sentra is selling so well. It’s huge inside and I am pretty sure it has the hip point of a CUV, if not close. The Ford Five Hundred opened the floodgates for the “notchback CUV”.

    On an unrelated note, I love GCBC but I was wondering- do you have any plans to include a sales comparison tool? Would be awesome for debating. Keep it up!

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    It’s no surprise… Nissan’s small sedans are pretty much CUVs with notchback trunks and slightly lower ride heights.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Really, which ones are AWD?

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        There are plenty of FWD CUVs. They are CUVs in hip point and general body height.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        Many crossovers aren’t AWD; they’re just front-drivers—minivans with swing doors and a butch nose.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          “Many crossovers aren’t AWD”

          …but, they have it available as an option

          “Nissan’s small sedans are pretty much CUVs”

          Which ones are AWD?

          Get it?

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            No, I’m afraid I don’t. Crossovers are (now) more about packaging then what wheels are driven; all-wheel drive is really just a vestige of the journey from truck to truck-based SUV to car-based CUV. European MPVs (which are marketed as CUVs when they make the leap across the pond) often don’t have all-wheel drive as an option.

            That said, I think the point about Nissan’s small sedans being crossovers has to do with ride height. I don’t think I would agree with that, as they’re not really crossover-tall in the way that, say, the Ford Five Hundred was.

            I think we’re falling into pedantry, here. Of course, it’s the internet, so that’s expected.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            I agree with the dizzying avatar guy. I’m all in love with CUVs and AWD has nothing to do with it.

            With good snow tires, AWD is mere flim-flammery.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            What manufacturer designated “Crossover” (CUV) is NOT available with AWD?

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            “crossover-tall in the way that, say, the Ford Five Hundred was”

            The fact that I can’t dispute that shows how literally and figuratively low we’ve sunk.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            @Lie2me

            Does someone have to feed you cheese and rub your head to get you to stop? (I know you’ll get the reference:-)

            Old people have launched the CUV phenom and most don’t care about AWD. They/we care about roof & ride height.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Everything Nissan makes is a CUV, fine

            Thanks for the cheese, rubbing my head, not so much

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            But seriously, Curlington, you really have always have associated CUV with AWD?

            I personally always check an interesting CUV to make sure it’s available in FWD-only, so maybe I’m inadvertently honoring your definition.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            “What manufacturer designated “Crossover” (CUV) is NOT available with AWD?”

            Off the top of my head
            * Chevrolet Orlando
            * Kia Rondo
            * Scion xB

          • 0 avatar
            celebrity208

            Currently: Citroen DS 6WR
            In the future I suspect there will be more.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Off the top of my head
            * Chevrolet Orlando /MPV
            * Kia Rondo /MPV
            * Scion xB /Compact car

            – Wikipedia

            Citroen DS 6WR Sold in China only and to be honest not up on Chinese vehicles

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            And for more pedantry: you asked about cars marketed as crossovers. Those three are marketed as crossovers in North America.

            Crossover is a body style; AWD is a feature. You may as well say a family sedan isn’t a family sedan unless it offers an optional V6.

            Cheap crossovers aren’t necessarily AWD, and I suspect we’ll see more front-drive-only examples as the SUV era becomes more and more of a memory.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I don’t think the xB is marketed as a crossover. Are you sure about this?

            If it doesn’t have AWD available, then it is simply not a “crossover utility vehicle.” It’s a hatchback. Just because it’s tall/square doesn’t make it a CUV.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Look have it your way, but…

            http://www.five.sg/wp/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Chevy_AdD-1024×847.jpg

            For those who can’t click on the link it’s a Chevy Orlando ad that says…

            “New Orlando The Premium MPV”

            I’m sure Chevy must be mistaken, because you say it’s a crossover

    • 0 avatar
      John R

      Psst…Guys, stop feeding the trolls…

  • avatar

    I’m surprised the Juke isn’t doing better. They seem very popular here in New England almost all driven by 20 and 30 something women.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      The Juke has been surprisingly successful (http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2011/01/nissan-juke-sales-figures.html), but it’s simply too small inside in North America to reach higher volume status. Some may also think the design rules the Juke out for some buyers, but it was the UK’s 10th-best-selling auto in October. And I’m a fan of its craziness.

      • 0 avatar
        schmitt trigger

        “….but it’s simply too small inside ”

        Small is an understatement.

        I loved the Juke, but the reason you state, was precisely the reason I ended up not buying it.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I’m guessing that the strength in Versa sales is because of the Note.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Large sales increases are easily done from prior sales levels that are low. Is that the case here?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Nissan brand car sales, according to Nissan, were up 16.1% in 2011, up another 7.3% in 2012, and then up 7.9% last year. Overall car sales in those three years rose 7%, 18%, and 4%.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Jesus.

    How many Altimas do we have to continue to see?

    And dam you, it’s too early for graphs.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Insert obligatory “fleet queen” reference here

      • 0 avatar
        sproc

        If the shoe fits… I’ve had a few Altimas as rentals the past couple of years. My desire to even consider one is zero (and my next buy will likely be in this class). I have no idea what people see in those cars against the competition.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          No experience with the new Altima. We bought a used fleet queen of the prior generation (2012) because a Yaris is no way to transport two children.

          The 2012 had a fair amount going for it over the competition at the time, depending on priorities. The steering is good. The ride is a nice blend of firmness and comfort. The cabin is quiet at speed. The 4-pot engine, though harsh, is quick enough with that CVT. The CVT is far more responsive than some traditional automatics.

          The only midsizers in that year which combined some driving enjoyment without excessive road noise were the Altima, Fusion, and Camry SE. The Fusion’s transmission was awful. The Camry SE quite a bit more expensive.

        • 0 avatar

          Cheap and ugly but spacious cars with crude but powerful engines – perfect fit for half of America. Another have chooses various Buick wannabes.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “The Maxima sells slightly more often than the Buick LaCrosse; slightly less often than the Chrysler 300.”

    This is surprising, because 1) the Maxima is so old and 2) it’s too expensive and 3) it’s now smaller than the Altima which 4) can be had with the same engine anyway.

    I also see many more LaCrosse and 300 models than I do Maximas.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      That’s a shame what they’ve done with that Maxima.

      I remember the old 4DSC days.

      The Maxima’s from the 80’s were virtually unkillable. A buddy of mine had a… 95, IIRC. It was a sweet machine.

      But I much, much enjoyed the hell out of my buddy’s Infiniti J30 with 300Z engine :)

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        95 was the last of the long and low square ones, with the full width rear brake lenses. 96 was the rounder body, where the I30 joined the party.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          89-94 was the 3rd generation you’re thinking of, 95-99 was the more rounded ones that introduced the marvelous VQ series of engines. Those fourth gen cars with the VQ30 are some of the most durable cars out there, highly recommended for a beater. Plenty quick even with the 4spd automatic, and absolute beasts with the stick shift even by today’s V6 sedan standards.

          The J30 is actually significantly slower than the equivalent ’95 Maxima, they’re quite a bit heavier.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh right the I30 was a year behind. Concur on the VQ30 cars being great, just sometimes have rust issues at the wheel wells in salt areas.

            And often times you can find the I30 for the same or less cost than the Maxima, which is never as well-equipped except in highest GLE form.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            Having owned a series of SEs (’89,’93,’95 and ’97), I have my own opinion:

            The perfect Maxima would be the 89-94 with a later VQ engine. It had better styling, and a more sophisticated suspension. The VQ in 3.0 liter form was a much nicer engine than the previous V6.

            It’s really sad what Nissan did to the Maxima with worst sin being the CVT transmission. All of mine were manuals.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            “The perfect Maxima would be the 89-94 with a later VQ engine.”

            You are absolutely correct my good man

          • 0 avatar
            Eiriksmal

            You mean… Like if someone dropped in a VQ35 into the 3rd gen and then hotted it out and run sub-12 second quarter miles, naturally aspirated?

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2ZS4k4szPU

            Anyone with a VQ30/35 needs to be buying NWP’s products. He’s an outstanding guy who creates some seriously quality products.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          ’94 was the last of the 4DSC, I had one, loved it! 2nd nicest car I ever had, the 1st being a E39 530i It’s a shame what happened to the Maxima after that

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Bunkie,

            I think the engine in the 3rd gens you are referring to is the VE30, with an iron block. The 4th gens were the first to have the VQ30, which is an all-aluminum engine (head and block).

            Edit: reread your post, and I absolutely agree!

            Corey, yes the only real Achilles heel of the 4th gen Maximas seems to be poor rustproofing, most often manifesting itself in rotted out bottoms of front fenders (by the bumper), rotted out radiator core supports, as well as rear quarter panels and rocker panels. I’ve even seen stone chips on doors bloom into ghastly bubbling rust spots.

            I think what really keeps those 4th gen maximas going, even in a Buy-here pay here status or in the ghetto, is a very robust and simple suspension (mac struts front, torsion beam rear) and a timing chain and strong internals on the VQ30. The jatco 4spd autos are also pretty up to snuff even when the fluid isn’t changed. This compares favorably to similar age Hondas (weaker suspension, timing belts on interference engines, auto transmissions) and Toyotas (prone to oil sludge/burning when neglected, timing belts).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I had a 97 I30, had 120K on the clock when I bought it in summer 06 IIRC. One owner, some records, pearl over tan, $3800. Replaced my 93 90S. Boy what an upgrade, my first Japanese car!

            Had just the smallest amount of rust over the driver’s side rear wheel well, not broken through the paint yet. And there was a small dent on the roof at the top of the rear window. Owner said he used to have a car phone antenna on there, and an auto car wash pushed it down and dented the roof. Not really noticeable though. Rode very nicely, quiet, reasonably quick, and got about 23-24mpg on average, and 19 in town with the AC.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The Maxima went upmarket in the ’80s, but was shot down to move luxury buyers up to Infinti. Same thing happened to the Cressida for Lexus.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I too just don’t get the appeal of the Maxima. What makes it different? Maybe if it was AWD or had a V8. The Z is unique so thankfully its still around.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I think they are just not interested in spending money on it, and have shown that since 2005, they are nearly prepared to let it go. For the costs, the interior is not nearly up to snuff either.

        And it’s a big fail for them to not offer AWD and make a Maxima-X. Those would sell! There are only one or maybe two options for a large sedan with V6 and AWD. The LaCrosse comes to mind.

        • 0 avatar
          Eiriksmal

          They do, it’s called YOUR DAILY DRIVER. The ’04-’08 Maxima is eerily similar to your M, only with a transverse engine and no AWD. And, you know, my 6MT they never offered you. :D

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      The Maxima isn’t expensive at all, the retail models have had $8-10,000+ on the hood forever and the rental companies are probably doing even better than that.

      Out the door they’re a couple thousand dollars less than a V6 Altima.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Maxima should be on sale in comparison to Altima, but I suppose building a low volume, high priced model, and leave your customers to eat the excessive depreciation is a winning strategy.

  • avatar
    NN

    Nissan has done a great job differentiating their products for the average consumer who is a non-enthusiast. Their volume vehicles, compared to competitors, are generally more affordable, more spacious, and more efficient. That’s a winning combination in the US (and Chinese, btw) market where generally value sells–that is what has sold so many domestic cars in the past. The Nissan reputation of decent reliability seals the deal. Also, whether it be marketing or just general building of success within a demographic, the brand is very popular with the African American population, a generally underserved/undermarketed segment. I bought a Quest minivan this year and love it. One thing I notice when I visit the dealer for service is that a) it is absolutely slammed with people/buyers and b) there is a disproportionate amount of African Americans. Their success seems well engineered.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      NN, they do sell a lot of Nissan product in my area, which includes Las Cruces, NM, El Paso, TX, Artesia, NM and Ruidoso, NM. Must be the hot, dry desert region.

      And they sure sell a lot of sub-$20K Altima sedans, even the 2015 variety. Not fancy, but it will get you from point A to point B.

      The way I see it, the first owner gets the benefit of the factory warranty for at least three years. What happens after that, no one cares about because it is the next owner’s worry and expense.

      If a first owner decides to keep their Nissan beyond the factory warranty, they deserve everything they get: good, bad or indifferent.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    I guess there isn’t much market for weird. Have been a Nissan fan for a long time. On our second cube and we love it. I understand they won’t have one for 2015. I think it’s a car you have to drive to appreciate.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I can’t believe the Cube has lasted this long. It was already old when they brought it over to the US.

    • 0 avatar
      Banger

      You know how I feel about this, wstarvingteacher. We’d be buying a second one in a few months’ time if not for Nissan’s stupid, stupid decision to kill the model.

      For the life of me, I don’t understand why Nissan is simply content to hand this segment of the market whole-hog over to the Kia Soul. There is OBVIOUSLY a place in the American small-car market for a premium boxy-bodied subcompact, because Kia’s having no trouble moving in excess of 100,000 units a year with the Soul. If Nissan bothered to advertise the cube at all, it might be able to eat a substantive chunk of that market.

      I don’t think it would get to 50% or anything — the platform’s too old, needs tech updates, and would need to get slightly better fuel economy — but I sure think it would be able to get to 25,000 sales per year. That’d beat the hell out of selling 300 a month like they have been for the last several months now.

      Nissan would reason that people who come to their dealerships wanting a cube will get talked into buying a higher profit-margin Versa Note instead. WRONG. They’ll head straight for the Kia dealer to buy a shiny new Soul.

  • avatar
    Onus

    I’m a big fan of the Versa Note. I rented one in Puerto Rico. Tons of room inside, easy to parallel park ( great turning radius ). Nice and narrow for the tiny city streets in older sections of puerto rican cities. I even had the model with manual windows and locks but cvt ( weird rental spec i suppose ) and still enjoyed it. The CVT works fine with my driving style and doesn’t bother me.

    • 0 avatar
      Occam

      My wife has a first generation Versa SL Hatch. It’s not terribly exciting to drive (and she doesn’t care… she’s not a “car-person”), but that thing checks every box a car should as a perfect appliance. Roomy, comfortable, great fuel economy, quiet on the road, and the interior quality is way above the levels of its fellow mini-cars by having a near mid-size car interior and far nicer interior trimmings(padded armrests, soft touch materials, and compartments that open smoothly do wonders for interior impressions).

      We took it on a 2500 mile road trip over the summer with two tweenage kids and a trunk full of luggage. Performed beautifully.

      For some reason, they switched from the Tiida to the Note as the foreign market “source” for the Versa hatch, and it became smaller, cheaper, and less powerful (122 hp down to 109).

  • avatar
    TW5

    The new Sentra is a great small/midsize car. Nissan have offered interior volume, cargo capacity, fuel-efficiency, and value-for-money. Hard to believe in an era of overpriced, nonfunctional features.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I wonder if anybody has driven both new Sentra and new Corolla for a comparison. Certainly the Sentra has a bit more grown up styling. I didn’t like it initially, but now I see it as just a shrunken Altima + a little Avalon in the rear. The wheels make a big difference on the Sentra too. Needs big ones.

      • 0 avatar
        kcflyer

        I had the new Corolla for a month on a work assignment as a rental. The Sentra also as a rental for about three weeks. I liked the look and feel of the Corolla better, handling, engine noise etc. But the Sentra was in my opinion a better value. It seemed roomier for my family of four with a larger trunk. The biggest complaint was the cvt in the Sentra would shudder during stops as you slowed through about 5 miles per hour. I see many others have reported this “Stuttering” with mixed results from Nissan.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Sitting in a showroom Sentra was enough to move it toward the bottom of the C-segment pack for my tastes. The drivers seat is short with poor support, shape, and adjustability. The backseat isn’t as roomy as I thought it would be, I think the Jetta and Corolla kill it here. The interior had some pretty appalling fit issues as well even though the panel materials aren’t too bad. And I don’t care for the exterior styling as the design language looks a bit awkward on such a tall & narrow car.

  • avatar
    superchan7

    A brand that is strong on value is doing better than others in a tough economy. Seems to make sense. The Versa has got to be near the top of the cabin-space/cost ratio.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Bought a 2015 Honda Fit a few weeks ago. After lots of shopping we had narrowed it down to the Fit LX manual and a 2014 Sentra. In the Sentra the manual is only available in the base model. Really liked the Sentra, had previously driven a 2000 Sentra for 150,000 mostly trouble free miles. New one is better in most ways but to get the manual transmission you really get a stripper model. Not even cruise control from the factory. Dealer offered to install cruise for $500 but I was not thrilled with the idea of a dealer mod to a new car. Also, not a single dealer in western NY had a manual trans Sentra to test drive. So we went with Fit and ended up saving nearly $1,000 over the base Sentra.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    After months of research and test drives we narrowed our recent purchase down to the 2015 Fit LX manual and the 2014 Sentra base manual. I previously had driven a 2000 Sentra GXE for 150,000 miles and had a great experience. Liked the new Sentra a lot but wanting a manual transmission means a stripper model. The deal breaker was it not coming from the factory with cruise control. Local dealer offered to install cruise but I was not crazy about the idea of a dealer mod to a new car. Also, no one in western NY State had a manual transmission equipped car for us to test drive. In the end we went with the Fit. If Nissan still offered a mid-level trim Sentra with the manual, and dealers bothered to stock one, we would likely be driving one today. FWIW, I had a new Corolla as a rental for a month earlier this year and liked it. But it too was not available with a manual and cruise and it priced out a couple grand more than the Honda and Nissan.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    To me this makes perfect sense.

    As a Nissan truck owner, they really have no value proposition within their truck and SUV segment. Their larger SUV small and mid size trucks are neither fuel efficient or offer, from personal experience, a reliability factor that is greater than any other manufacturer offerings. Pretty much from my vantage point, their only value proposition is on the used market once Enterprise gets done with them you can get a decent frontier for half price, which makes for a good value. 30k for a new one? That is just foolish when you can get a full size with far greater power and the same or better MPG.

    My problem is I prefer the smaller truck vs a full size.

    I

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I see a lot of Titan pickup trucks in my area, mostly driven by enlisted men and women of the nearby airbase.

      It is significant because there isn’t a Nissan dealer within 90 miles of them, which means they have to travel to be able to get one, or get one serviced.

      I believe it is the lower transaction price that makes the Titan the better value. They may not sell a lot of them, but every one they do sell is a sale lost for their four competitors.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        “I see a lot of Titan pickup trucks in my area.”

        This is the first time this sentence has been typed/written in the history of the written word.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          bball, yes, it was surprising to me as well to see such a number of them on the airbase when we go to the Commissary or BX. Ditto with the Missile Range 45 miles down the road.

          I suspect, the dealers in conjunction with USAA, make the Titan’s “value for the money” hard to resist.

          Add to that the super-low financing rates with zero down for military members and Ford, GM, RAM and especially Toyota, are out of reach for many.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The bases in the Tucson area (Davis-Monthan, Tucson ANG base, and Fort Huachuca) were crawling with F150s, Silverados, and RAMs. And more Wranglers than you could shake a stick at. I also never drove a day in Tucson without seeing a Border Patrol Tahoe.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yeah, it’s pretty much the same here for Ft Bliss, TX, and its supporting bases (Biggs Field, MacGregor Range), and White Sands Missile Range, Holloman AFB, and all the test ranges in this area.

            Any time you see a Titan among those other trucks, it’s WTF? And that’s why I mentioned the surprising number of Titans in my area. I have moved beyond the level of WTF?

      • 0 avatar
        Occam

        I’m surprised there’s anywhere populated that’s 90 miles from a Nissan dealership. BMW, Audi, sure, but Nissan? Wow!

        I’d bet most of them bought them before moving there. Even if they buy a new car during that tour, they’ll probably sell them to someone else in the area.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “most of them bought them before moving there”

          Maybe some, but most of them have the license plate holder or decals from the local dealers on the tailgate.

          Back in 2011 I thought seriously about a 5.6L Titan for less than $30K out the door but ended up buying the 5.7 Tundra for $5K more from the dealership that had sold us our 2008 Highlander.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      Nissan Xterra Pro-4x costs less than MSRP on a base 4×2 Toyota 4Runner. Nissan Armada starts at $6,000 less than Tahoe, Expedition, or Sequoia. Nissan trucks are decent values once you reach mid-level to upper level trim.

      Bargain-pricing is something Nissan does right. In fact, the rest of the oligopoly has complained bitterly that they refuse to take the prices established by the other major players.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    I’m amazed. The only current Nissan I find even remotely appealing is the base Versa Note. This is only because it seems like a decent value and looks nice for the price. Add any options, though, and the value proposition falls off quickly. A friend recently got a base Note with a manual trans and for $12k she couldn’t even find a decent used car.

    The rest of their lineup of cars is so vanilla to be invisible and the near-mandatory CVT on anything above a base model is disappointing.

    That said, they seem to be discounting heavily and in terms of space for the money for people who don’t read TTAC or even know what a CVT is, they are good values, I suppose.

    • 0 avatar
      Occam

      If I can’t have three pedals, I’d rather have a CVT anyway. If I’m not in full control of the transmission, I want it to be as smooth and unnoticable as possible. A DCT with no manual option is just insulting!

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    We bought a used 2012 Altima for my wife because it fit a need and she cares little about cars. On that front it has been a good vehicle. It’s even a decent car to drive for a basic 4-cylinder family sedan.

    There’s nothing in their current lineup that would remotely tempt me to buy new, though. In every segment their offering is eclipsed by some other brand.

    They’ve apparently carved out a pretty large niche building alternative Toyotas, so they deserve congrats on their business acumen.

  • avatar
    amancuso

    This surprises me as I think all of Nissan’s offerings are gaudy overstyled bloat mobiles. Just as bad as their Infiniti division

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    If a station wagon falls in the “car” category, should’t a crossover do the same?

  • avatar
    caljn

    There is a good deal of kneejerk Altima and cvt hate around here though I would expect most haven’t spend much time with either.
    The 4 cyl is a bit buzzy around town, but freeway cruising is quiet and supremely economical. But the Altima really shines with the V6. Quick and smooooth power delivery with the cvt, great seats and driving position. I would take it over a Camry and ‘gasp’ an Accord any day.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Seems dull as dishwater flying out the Niss store.. Note’s buried in with Versa.I heard it wasn’t sales hit hoped for. Gees that plant in hot springs MX must be bubbling away. Shame latest iteration of Sentra is no Perrier. Is there room under the hood for SPEC V?

  • avatar
    plee

    I have the opportunity to drive dozens of late model used cars at a large auto auction every week. Many of the cars are Nissan and Infiniti products, ex rentals and lease turn ins. The Altima has the roughest 4 cylinder of any make I have driven, and combined with the CVT it really would be hard to live with when there are many other choices that are quieter. When Altimas are three or four years old with typical miles on them, the CVT is really jerky and the drone from the engine is really loud. The sales numbers reflect a very high number of daily rental sales and that combined with their frequent advertising and aggressive pricing is giving them a surge in the current market. It is a market with many choices. I just don’t think the Altima is near the top of the mid size offerings.

  • avatar
    mechaman

    Wonder who’s buying the latest models? fugly if you ask me .. the ’13 and ’14 Camry make the Altima look weird (no, it does that all alone) I haven’t seen a Maxima in a LONG time. The Sentra fell off too.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • dantes_inferno: FCA motto: Dodge testing. RAM into production.
  • Schurkey: A few years back, I treated myself to a Challenger 5.7 Hemi rental car for several days when vacationing on...
  • SCE to AUX: I was shocked to see an SSR in the wild the other day. The Hummer EV will do better, but I wouldn’t...
  • SCE to AUX: Yeah, I’ll bet the engineers didn’t think of that. Have you seen the armor plate under the...
  • CaddyDaddy: Ya, but when Dalton got to Missouri and the Roadhouse, the Riv was the one to go with for the Dirty Work.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber