By on November 3, 2014

2015 Ram 700

For some, the Chevrolet Colorado’s “technology and stuff” is just what they need in a truck. For others, however, the mid-size pickup’s footprint is still a tad too big.

If you call Mexico your home, Ram has just what you need.

According to Jalopnik subsidiary Truck Yeah, the Fiat Strada-based 2015 Ram 700 hails from Brazil — where the Strada is also assembled — and battles against the Chevrolet Tornado and Volkswagen Saveiro in the Mexican market. Both single- and extended-cab versions are available, beginning at $14,000 USD for the stripper model, $18,000 for the Adventure trim (which also offers a locking-diff and digital inclinometer for off-roading adventures).

Under the bonnet, a blast from the past moves the front wheels: the 115-horsepower 1.6-liter Fiat E.torQ. The four-pot 16-valve SOHC mill is derived from the Chrysler/Dodge/Plymouth Neon’s 2-liter unit, and has been in production as the E.TorQ since 2011.

Regarding its name, the 700 was planned to be called 750, but instead took the name to identify a payload capacity of 705 kilograms, or approximately 1,500 pounds.

As for the possibility of seeing the 700 in the United States, Ram and parent company Fiat Chrysler Automobiles haven’t said much on the subject. Though FCA could get around the Chicken Tax by assembling U.S.-bound units in Mexico if need be, low fuel prices and consumer demand outside of enthusiast circles are another matter.

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82 Comments on “2015 Ram 700 Newest Entrant In Mexican Compact Truck Market...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    ” Though FCA could get around the Chicken Tax by assembling U.S.-bound units in Mexico if need be”

    Now you’ve done it, awakening the spirits of the Chicken Tax will only bring doom down upon the House of TTAC

    Save yourselves

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    There’s some serious green in that photo. Can’t be Mexico, can it?

    Another cute but useless toy. Car tries to be truck = Cruck.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      But, we love “Crucks”

    • 0 avatar
      Monty

      Petezeiss – they’re not useless little trucks, though. We saw more of these little trucklets in Mexico than we did fullsizers. And almost without exception they were being used as trucks; in some cases the box so full of stuff they looked like they would tip over at any moment.

      Consdering it’s got a payload of 1500 lbs, and a box not much smaller than what’s on my Ranger, it would be the perfect little daily-driver/weekend warrior for me. For what guys like me do on the weekends, one of these is more than sufficient. As long as I can strap sheets of wallboard onto the back, or transport my snowblower for dealing with my in-law’s driveway, it’s perfect for what I would need.

      The bonus of these little trucklets is much better fuel economy that a fullsizer.

      I would seriously spend money for a brand new one – are you listening FCA?

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        Sorry, Monty, I’m totally old school (and spoiled by American roads) about trucks. I grew up with at least one 8′ bed/reg. cab in the family at all times. I can barely accept 6-footers.

        I’m a creature of my time and place.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I’m even more old-school than you and I personally love the idea of bringing true COMPACT trucks back to US shores.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Yeah, trucks, not compact sedans with the trunk lids missing.

            Gotta have bed space, only need two seats.

          • 0 avatar
            Hank

            Yep. True old school is a road that was full of everything from Scottsdale crew cabs down to Couriers, El Caminos, and Mazda rotary pickups. Our forefathers knew the value of small, efficient trucks, and that you didn’t win a pissing contest using a 1″ socket on a 1/4″ bolt.

            To every job a tool, and for some, this is the right tool.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yeah when you look at that thing, just add a cap on the back mentally, and it’s clearly a Subaru XV style hatchback.

      • 0 avatar
        Monty

        Hey Pete, no need to apologize! I too grew up with trucks in the family – in fact, for a stretch my dad had a 3/4 ton 4WD Ford as a business truck/family vehicle, and trucks were a staple on our farm. I learned to drive, partially, in a ’47 Dodge 1/2 ton.

        But, I’m older now, and I’m a realist with respect to my vehicles. I like to drive what suits my needs, and a fullsizer is far too much truck. I am always renovating/fixing/removing/replacing around the house, and my Ranger does an admirable job, but one of these trucklets would be even better suited for the job, plus be a really good daily driver.

        Be a creature of your time and place, and buy whatever the heck you want. It’s what makes for this awesome TTAC community, isn’t it?

        • 0 avatar
          petezeiss

          Monty, I learned to drive in a ’53 GMC. Three-on-the-tree and so worn out I had to hold the shifter in 2nd gear or it would just drop right out :-) But I was 13 and had the run of rural roads around our cottage so it was 7th heaven.

          And, yeah, modern 1/2 tons are now so needlessly huge that I would rather have a Ranger for remodel trips, too. Or, really, I’d rather have a long-bed Isuzu/Chevy from the ’80s if I can’t have a normal sized 1/2 ton ever again.

          But still, a truck is all about the bed so that little thing in the picture would be outworked by any minivan.

          • 0 avatar
            Monty

            Pete: The bed comes in configurations of up to 67″ long by 51″ wide – almost the same size as my short-box Ranger. (assuming my limited Spanish language skills and metric to SAE conversion skills were up to the task)

            I know it’s not for everybody, and most likely won’t be sold in Canada or the U.S., but it would be ideal for my needs.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            OK, 67″ is definitely in the useful range. That little Migrant Boss Barbie edition in the photo is misleading.

      • 0 avatar
        daver277

        If its kept simple and fwd, the bed can be loaded at knee height, not elbow height.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      If you’ve never been far from the U.S. border, Mexico can seem rather arid, but the lower half of the country, and much of both coasts, is pretty lush. That’s where most of Mexico’s population is. The northernmost third of the country contains less than 10% of the population, and most of that is concentrated in a few cities along the border.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      From What I can gather these are only built in Mexico,Brazil and Malaysia and only used in those countries

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        While that may be true today, that doesn’t mean it’s still true tomorrow. Even the Volkswagen Beetle came back, after “only built in Mexico, Brazil and Malaysia and only used in those countries.” Granted, the new Beetle wasn’t the same as the old one, but now the New Beetle is the Old Beetle.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Vulpine,
          These small car/trucks seem to have a lot of fans in the US. My feeling, Fiat or Ford might roll one out for people interested. Not just this website but other Automotive US sites have commented favourably

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @petitezeiss,
      A truck

      http://www.abccranehire.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/SCANIA-2.jpeg

      A toy

      http://image.8-lug.com/f/features/1210_8l_style_points_2011_ford_f_350/39430070/1210-8l-12%2Bstyle-points-2011-ford-f350%2B2011-ford-f250-towing-and-using-spyder-headache-rack.jpg

      The world’s best lifestyle pickup and lifestyle vehicle and it’s German. Imagine the world’s best pickup if from the EU, Austria.

      http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/z/brabus-b-s-x-mercedes-g-amg-frankfurt-sept-shown-th-iaa-internationale-automobil-ausstellung-september-frankfurt-33585497.jpg

      World’s fastest pickup, not American, from Australia.

      http://www.cityhsv.com.au/hsv_au/images/maloo-r8/hsv-gen-f-maloo-r8-exterior-1-lg.jpg

      World’s pickup sold in the most countries, not American, is Aussie designed

      http://www.themotorreport.com.au/content/image/2/0/2012_ford_ranger_super_cab_00-4d94183199f75-mc:819×819.jpg

      A US performance pickup that does 98mph!!! It looks great and fast!!

      http://www.csmonitor.com/var/ezflow_site/storage/images/media/content/2013/0627/0627-business-tremor/16216597-1-eng-US/0627-business-Tremor_full_600.jpg

      A 2 litre Korean diesel pickup that does 106mph.

      http://www.caradvice.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/2012-ssangyong-actyon-sports-spr-1.jpg

      Yes, you American’s do get the best!

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “The sky is falling, the sky is falling!” said Chicken Little-tax

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    It will never sell in the US with that engine. I’d buy a used V6 Ranger for an occasional “run to Home Depot” truck before I’d plunk down for a new truck with a clown car powerplant.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    I cannot see it selling either, Outside of Mexico, Malaysia and Brazil not many of these exist globally

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    Outside of Mexico, Brazil and Malaysia, not many places have these

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I think they’d be more popular than people think. The market is always looking for the “next big thing” and this could fit the bill in a sea of CUV/SUV and full size truck offerings.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      PrincipalDan, you said it better than I. +1!

      A perfect size for suburban warriors and an occasional foray into the country for my son and I with all our gear.

      I may even be tempted to buy a Chrysler product again.

    • 0 avatar
      wstarvingteacher

      If it will haul 1500 lbs it will tow a lot more. I needed it 4-5 years ago. Will probably drive this 4runner till I die and think I need 4wd. However, this would actually be capable of replacing both of my vehicles. If, that is, Fiat is dependable this time around.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    This thing has my interest and would certainly be more appealing to those Americans who don’t want to be seen driving something with a Fiat name badge (I’m not one of them). I personally know too many people who simply don’t need huge size–though I admit I would prefer a slightly longer bed (minimum 5 feet not counting tailgate) and hopefully wide enough to carry a sheet of plywood flat between the rails (even my old Mitsubishi/D-50 had a way to do that). At this price range, it would be extremely appealing to most of those who want an open bed but are not willing to accept the size of the current mid-size or full-size trucks.

  • avatar

    Add a fourth door to the extended-cab for symmetry (and some money in my wallet), send it up here, and I just might take the Adventure trim up to Mount Rainier, then back to Seattle for a cider run!

    Hell! I’d take it out to the Bakken with a Colorado and… whatever other not-full-size truck might be around, and film one of those Top Gear-style travel shows, but TTAC Zaibatsu-style!

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Do an “essentials” or “tradesmen” trim with AC, 5 speed manual, windshield defrost, power brakes & steering, sliding rear window, rinse out interior and price it at $9,999 including destination (in brown paint) and it will FLY off dealer lots.

    Do a “Baja” trim by adding 4×4, low gear, skid plate, trailer hitch, dual transmission cooler, club cab edition with cruise, tach/oil pressure/oil temp gauge cluster, pw/pl, 6 speaker stereo, tint, larger wheels/tiires, 2″ extra lift, 4 wheel disc brake, ESC for $4,599 more, and they won’t be able to make them fast enough.

    Yeah, that’s right – $14,599 including destination BOOM!

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Can they hit those price points shipping kits from Brazil, assembling them in Mexico and shipping them to the U.S.? Does Sergio want to play in that price range? I suspect the answers are no, and no.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Has to be $15001 add a dollar for manufacturer’s profit and a dollar dealer profit

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      They’ll break even or lose a nominal sum per truck INITIALLY, but they’ll re-create an entire new niche, create an aftermarket upgrade/customization Sonic Boom, and have higher trim and a profitable space that they’ll own much to the chagrin of the competition that ignored this area, within a few years.

      They can sell this alongside the Renegade.

    • 0 avatar
      daver277

      If the tradesmen want a deisel, Fiat has great JTDs.

    • 0 avatar

      I did some figuring based on my neighbor buying his 1989 s10 new for 6K with inflation that seems to be around 11,500. I think if they could keep a base model under 14k and a reasonably equipped version under 20k that still would sell a ton. But it would need to be close to the south american market version as the R and D for a NA version may kill that pricing concept.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Couldn’t they have found a better way to install factory fender flares than by bolting those ugly things to the outside of the sheet metal?

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Couldn’t they have found a better way to install factory fender flares than by bolting those ugly things to the outs*de of the sheet metal?

  • avatar
    daver277

    If its kept simple and fwd, the bed can be loaded at knee height, not elbow height.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Someone should buy the old Toyota assembly line equipment for their old pickups and start building them at some third world factory and install some modern drivetrain and it will sell like McDonald’s cheeseburgers.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I forgot what little Toyota pickup it was, but a relative of mine 20 years older than me, and who did estimates for an asphalt business, bought a 4 banger Toyota in the late 80s or early 90s and drove the piss out of it (nearly 300k miles I’m guessing?) with just routine maintenance.

      It had a full size bed.

      It was his favorite truck of all time, and he owned many, and many much larger ones.

      It was a 4 or 5 speed manual 4×4 with air, cruise, stereo, and that’s about it.

      If someone brought a truck like that back, at the starting price point of 12k or so, they’d hit a grand slam.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    On the US market, this trucklet would be a lifestyle vehicle. A lifestyle vehicle is bought by someone that needs attention and kept until they figure out that their lifestyle actually demands the real utility of a sedan or CUV, at which point they buy one of those from a brand they think will command respect for them.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Meanwhile, the mid-size and compact SUV market tanks.

    • 0 avatar
      Monty

      So my lifestyle vehicle (a 12 year old Ford Ranger) implies that I’m seeking attention?

      I’ve long since figured out that a sedan is about the last thing my lifestyle needs.

      Remember, SUV’s and CUV’s were once dismissed as “lifestyle” vehicles (you know, Soccer Moms and all that).

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The way some of you put it, “lifestyle” seems set to become the next buzzword, like “sustainable” or “synergy”.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Drzhivago138 – agreed. Lifestyle covers everything. Any truck NOT used to put food on the table is a lifestyle vehicle.

        It has come to mean any recreational choice that doesn’t involve towing 10 tons or carrying a ton.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          True. A Ram 1500 with an 801 lb payload is certainly a lifestyle vehicle, just one that isn’t marketed as such and has the prospect of selling well for generations. That’s as opposed to lifestyle vehicles like the Samarai, Baja, FJ Cruiser, Element, Avalanche, XTerra, soft-top or two-door SUVs other than the Wrangler(have you seen a new one with a soft-top lately?), Rampage, VehiCross, or mid-sized two-door coupe.

  • avatar
    Occam

    Extended cab, manual transmission, rubberized interior like my old Element, fuel efficient engine, and an extendable gate like the Subaru Baja. Compact, efficient, easy to park in garages or in cramped lots when I go down to the hipster district for food and events, but easy to toss a couple of bicycles in the back and drive out to a state park.

    I’d buy one in a heartbeat. Take my money, FCA!

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Yeah, and nobody else would buy one, just like nobody bought a Baja.

      • 0 avatar
        wolfinator

        The problem with the Baja (for me) is that it’s bed was too darn small. To much on the sedan side of the equation, not enough pickup.

        It’s the same problem I have with the Honda Ridgeline. The bed is too small!

        A bed has to be at least 5′ (not including tailgate). 7′ would be idea for me, but nobody else wants that it seems.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    Why is there a sheep-skull badge on that Ridgeline?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    The Strada um cough gasp Ram 700 is a decent looking little trucklet. As long as the price of fuel remains low this kind of vehicle would be a tough sell other than for a small niche market. There have been various rumours of this trucklet coming to the USA unless those rumours were fueled by pundits who do not know that Mexico IS IN North America.

    I’d rather buy a Tacoma or Colorado. That 1500lb payload would shrink to 700 lbs (not kilo’s) in USA trim.

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