By on October 27, 2014

2013-lincoln-mkz-awd-grille-and-badge-photo-490190-s-1280x782

Over the next five years, every Lincoln in the showroom presently will either be redesigned or replaced as part of an overall effort by Ford CEO Mark Fields to return to the premium brand to glory.

Reuters reports the plan comes with a significant investment: over $5 billion during the next five years. The money will be spent to not only revamp the product portfolio, but to help position the portfolio against those of BMW and Mercedes-Benz at home and in China. $2 billion has already been spent in the previous two years, split between preparing the brand for the Chinese market, and refreshing and expanding the lineup before the plan kicks into gear.

The centerpiece of the restoration plan is the D6 platform, which will provide a base for front-, rear- and all-wheel drive sedans and crossovers as early as 2019. Though the platform will be shared with Ford, D6’s purpose is to help set Lincoln apart from the Blue Oval portfolio, and to make the brand more competitive with a stronger base to build upon.

The first models to be built upon the modular architecture include a mid-size sedan and a seven-passenger crossover that could take up with both the MKZ and MKT could leave off. Before then, however, a few redesigns and replacements are set to come, beginning with the redesign of the MKX and replacement of the MKS between the springs of 2015 and 2016. Following up in 2017, the Navigator would gain a new platform from the upcoming 2015 Ford F-150, with aluminum panels to match, while the MKC would get a redesign in 2018.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

176 Comments on “Lincoln To Undergo $5B Five-Year Extensive Revamp...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Well there you go, who said Ford doesn’t listen?

  • avatar
    old5.0

    Good News! Just hope there’s substance to Fields’ plan and this doesn’t turn out to be 5 billion spent on the same old ****.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    An example of Ford’s idea of how to spend a lot of cash to reinvigorate, revive & differentiate Lincoln’s bespoke (from Ford’s mainstream/volume oriented) product portfolio:

    “Following up in 2017, the Navigator would gain a new platform from the upcoming 2015 Ford F-150, with aluminum panels to match, while the MKC would get a redesign in 2018.”

    [Voice of Bill Lumberg from Office Space]

    “Soooo, Mark Fields. Yeeeaaaaaaah. Whaaaaat’s happening. I’m going to have to ask why you argued with Alan Mulally about whether to try & save Lincoln when he really wanted to euthanize it, mmmmkay?”

    Alternative title: How to flush 5 billion dollars down the toilet delaying the inevitable.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I have to disagree DW, it *can* be done but the questions are: (1) is it worth doing? and (2) will they go the distance with funding and product development?

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Their announcement out of the gate under Shields is some sort of point-of-pride announcement that a rebadged Ford F-150 will be a core part of Lincoln’s rebirth.

        They need to revisit Mulally’s clear wisdom on this subject matter, heed that wisdom and perspective, and just euthanize Lincoln.

        • 0 avatar
          J.Emerson

          I really don’t understand the objection to continuing the Navigator nameplate. A full-size SUV is a must-have for any serious luxury brand. The Navigator has been, and probably will continue to be, a major profit engine for Lincoln.

          • 0 avatar
            akatsuki

            Because a luxury F150 SUV is dumb. They need a premier large sedan and should also do a full-size crossover which is an unaddressed market. Beef up the lux bonafides of the new Mustang for a RWD small and midsize play. And regardless, in 5 years all your models better be electric if you want to be a luxury player.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            akatsuki-

            They are adding a RWD crossover that isn’t BoF. It’ll replace the MkT.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I think Mulally looked at the cost to shut the brand down, as well as fighting internal pressure, and took the cheaper middle road of clone the Fords. Now you’ve got China in the mix more so than you did in 2004/5 and the Chinese customers (1) have little knowledge of the brands N.A. issues and (2) might accept the brand as truly premium. Lincoln could be Ford’s Buick in China which is what I suspect they are thinking.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Whatever retrospective history paints Mulally as, during his time as Ford CEO, few (if any) retrospectives will paint him as unaware or dismissive of the importance of global branding, equity (quality/recognition) and how global markets can massively benefit a product line.

            He spent time as CEO of Boeing, after all, prior to his Ford stint, with Boeing’s fundamental business model literally being all about critical reliance on constant overseas expansion, market share and equity, and still, Mulally wanted to kill Lincoln (and would have if not for Mark Shields pleas PLUS the fact that he knew that Shields would succeed him).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            My understanding of his philosophy (lacking as it may be) was Ford was somehow good enough to stand on its own and be both a main line and luxury brand. I completely disagree with this line of thinking, but to a point it seems to have worked at least here in the US. I talk to people who think their Ford is semi-premium and ignore all of the glaring problems from fuel economy, to the Sync hiccups, electronic gremlins, poor styling, and expensive tire replacement on the car based models. Now you and I know better than to see through the veneer Ford paints on some of its models to the Tempo lurking underneath in some cases, but the average person has been somewhat hoodwinked. The irony is although both Chevrolet and Ford have improved from their equivalent offerings fifteen years ago, the perception I gather from most Chevrolet owners is they still know its a Chevrolet. Ford people seem to think their cars are on par with 90s Toyota in terms of initial quality, which makes me chuckle.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Ford Australia has been developing a new FWD Lincoln, for China initially but who knows?
            http://www.goauto.com.au/mellor/mellor.nsf/story2/9F6C8893AFF4BDFCCA257CDE00219906

        • 0 avatar
          VCplayer

          What’s wrong with a Lincoln Expedition? They’ve sunk billions into to F-150 platform development, why not feature it up and sell it as a Lincoln?

          That’s like the easiest decision ever to make.

          Also, $5 billion over 5 years really isn’t a ton. Lincoln will continue to make incremental gains in quality and design, and hopefully for them consumers will take note. It’s hardly a waste though, especially if they catch on in China.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I think your (2) is answered here:

        “Though the platform will be shared with Ford, D6’s purpose is to help set Lincoln apart from the Blue Oval portfolio, and to make the brand more competitive with a stronger base to build upon.”

        This has been said before, except substitute P3 instead of D6. Or whatever. It’s not a Lincoln platform which is only “shared” with Ford, it’s the other way around (as per usual).

        Which Volvo will the D6 be from?

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    No more MKTs pls.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    BMW, Audi, Mercedes have so many models to choose from. While Lincoln and Cadillac are aiming for the volume segments, I think both really need an expanded lineup to really compete on the same level not to mention a truly global sales network.

    Both brands (Lincoln and Cadillac) need new crossovers in lots of sizes and flavors quickly. Even then, they will be a long way from offering the dizzying array of models the Germans have on offer. I suppose you have to start somewhere. The new Caddy sedans and the MKC are all nice efforts in their segments, but a long way from plugging all the holes in their respective brand lineups.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Lincoln is actually ahead of Cadillac in the CUV game with the MKC and a new MKX on the way followed by an MKT replacement.

      The lack of CUVs is really hurting Cadillac.

      But in terms of competition for Lincoln, Buick’s CUV lineup is probably more in line with the Encore, Enclave and upcoming Envision.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    The one thing Lincoln is lacking (versus other premium brands) is a sporty edge. Cadillac did it to compete with BMW (BurgerKingRing time trials, adding a stick, image overhaul etc). Of course, you can say the results are mixed and Caddy hasn’t lit up the market (or the Germans for that matter) but at least they changed direction. I don’t see this with Lincoln and I think it will be a big piece of the puzzle for future success. Sure, the MKZ Hybrid is a great car but there is nothing to suggest sporty and “youth”. They need that extra oomph to get away from the coach roof, wire wheel crowd. I hope that is part of the 5 billion dollar plan.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I’m not sure if “sporty” is something Lincoln needs to succeed. There are a lot of brands doing “sporty” along with what they call “luxury”. Let Ford, SVT, 999 or whatever they want to call their performance division focus on sporty, Lincoln would be better served giving buyers maximum luxury value. Hit em where they ain’t as they say.

      I would love a stretched Mustang in the form of a swanky Lincoln coupe, however.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Lincoln needs to be ALL about super plush ride quality, library quiet interiors, bank vault solid chassis’, super premium interior and exterior details (real brushed stainless steel & wood, super premium leather, exquisite gauges, milled from billet & forged components, better-than-Lexus customer service and club,e their warranty).

        Right now, there is a 38k (MSRP; real ATP will be lower soon) 2015 Hyundai Genesis that shames (in even base form) most Cadillac & Lincoln products in these respects that MSRP for literally 2x as much, and the Genesis is loaded in base form, and has a 10 year/100k warranty as icing.

        Now that Cadillacs & Lincolns don’t ride like Cadillacs & Lincolns, and the 2015 Genesis is a significant leap forward in terms of ride/suspension tuning (a former Genesis Achilles heel), BOOM!

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The CTS is the 3rd best selling sedan in the midsize luxury segment, bettering the A6 by a good bit in sales.

      • 0 avatar
        darkwing

        That’s a marketers’ comparison. The CTS is really competing with the A4, 3-series, and C-class.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          While that was true for the 1st and 2nd gen CTS sedans (which were actually “tweeners”), the 3G CTS is a full fledged midsize luxury sedan (3rd highest ATP in the segment after the E Class and 5 Series) and Cadillac also has the XTS in the same midsize price bracket – so Cadillac sells a lot more sedans in that price range than Audi or Lexus.

  • avatar
    theupperonepercent

    #1 bring back real names: Town Car, Continental, etc.

    #2 bring back RWD/ AWD platform.

    #3 benchmark the Mercedes C, E and S-class.

    #4 realize you can’t compete anymore

    The Lincoln and Cadillac names have been supplanted by BMW and Mercedes Benz. The only things they make anymore that truly compete are the Escalade and Navigator.

    The CTS is a great car, but name recognition will take BMW and Mercedes farther – at those prices – than it will Cadillac or Lincoln.

    They are seen as “budget” brands. Things you buy when you can’t afford the Germans.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      “The CTS is a great car, but name recognition will take BMW and Mercedes farther – at those prices – than it will Cadillac or Lincoln.”

      The CTS is a just okay, sort of hideous car, with a badge that has sadly lost any true goodwill, tied to a boat anchor of a parent organization, with long term quality/reliability still shoddy, MSRP’d at an asinine price that superior competitors can be had a’plenty for (e.g. Mercedes E Class, higher trim BMW 3 Series, Audi A6… 12k from a Lexus LS460 FFS).

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      “#3 benchmark the Mercedes C, E and S-class.”

      I disagree. Lincoln should be American luxury and style. Trying to be cheaper Germans won’t fool anybody.

      • 0 avatar
        jkk6

        Wikipedia indicates Lincoln with its wanna be German hard suspension LS fooled 262,900 people over 7 years 1999-2006 in the US. I wonder if that is enough to recoup R&D costs, cause in comparison Honda only sold 100k s2000 world wide during a longer time period.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          What was the price difference between the LS in V6/8 form and the GS, I wonder?

          Because for ALL of those years the GS was vastly superior in every way.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Says the former GS owner :)

            Actually I initially thought you were referring to the Lexus LS4xx then I backtracked ans realized you meant the Lincoln LS. This is what happens when you use stupid names.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Even if I weren’t a GS owner (and even though the LS extended through the start of the NEXT generation GS), it would still be true!

            :)

    • 0 avatar
      bimmermax

      “#1 bring back real names: Town Car, Continental, etc.

      #2 bring back RWD/ AWD platform.

      #3 benchmark the Mercedes C, E and S-class. ”

      Agree with everything except #3.
      Lincoln should be chasing Lexus buyers.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I’m kind of a cheapskate, so I wonder if Mr. Mulally had it right. Just make Lincoln really nice Fords and sell them for a bargain price. Maybe put that money into the dealerships so that buyers get a nicer experience.

    • 0 avatar
      theupperonepercent

      Make the interior of the Lincoln look like the interior of a Jaguar XJ-L…

      Should have been that way in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Just make Lincoln really nice Fords and sell them for a bargain price.”

      They’ve done that but not with bargain prices. Resale is telling, the fact you will pay more for the equivalent Ford wholesale *and* in some cases retail tells me the cars both overpriced and not in demand. They walk a tight rope, Lincoln is supposed to be “better” but in fact it is the same for 25% more and then it suffers a much higher initial hit than the Ford cousin because it is just an overpriced Ford in the first place. I suspect Mr Fields is going to attempt to differentiate things a bit, but without compelling reasons to buy the “Lincoln” over the “Ford”, resale will suffer. This is a great time to completely jettison everything they’ve done since about 2006 and truly reboot the brand.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I purchased a used MkT last year and my parents actually bought a used MKZ today. Both are CPO vehicles. Both were 2-3 model years old and have low miles. The MKZ has under 20k miles.

        Total MSRP new – $103870
        Total price paid as CPO vehicles – $41990

        My MkT was priced less than any Flex Ecoboost I could find. My parents MKZ sold for more than most Fusions, but it has the 3.5L V6, AWD, Nav, leather, etc that most Fusions do not have.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Glad to hear your mum pulled the trigger on the Zephyr. Depreciation should continue to the 10-12K mark by year five and level off based on the modeling I did in 2012 on the 07s.

          Lincoln is building some great used cars, but that’s kind of my point. Foolish to look at one new.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            She drove most of the new midsized sedans and compact CUVs. She didn’t like many of the crossovers, and especially disliked the Cherokee. She was even unimpressed with the CR-V, which suprised me. I thought the Honda would be on the top of her list.

            She did like most of the sedans. The 200, Fusion, and Accord were on the top of the list. I think she liked the 200 the best, but my father couldn’t fit in the passenger seat very well, visability was poor, and she thought it was too expensive.

        • 0 avatar
          Zoom

          There is a reason used MKT’s are cheaper than an ecoboost Flex. The MKT looks like a hearse.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’ll drive my deathmobile with $5000 in my pocket and a better warranty/service experience than if I were to have purchased a CPO Flex instead.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I much prefer the interior/dash of the MKT compared to the very plain, cheap one in the Flex.

            Besides, Matthew McConaughey was in Contact with Jodie Foster (one of the worst movies I ever saw) and I saw him driving a Lincoln and waxing philosophically the other day.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @DeadWeight Those are pretty old interiors, though — they both predate Ford’s more recent push to improve interiors across the board.

            Do you feel as strongly about the MKC versus the Escape?

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I think that the Escape looks nice in terms of exterior design, but the interior has got too much of that Focus/Fiesta angular theme going on.

            I think that the MKC is Lincoln’s best styled vehicle inside and out, by a wide margin, and is at least class competitive (though it hasn’t earned trust reliability wise and is muchnimlroved).

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            “Ford’s more recent push to improve interiors across the board.”

            That push must postdate the new Escape I looked at today. Everything except the seats looked like it was made of black wax.

          • 0 avatar
            anomaly149

            There’s a reason it looks like a hearse: it was designed in part to provide a successor to Towncar based coachbuilt hearses and limos.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            dtremit – I will probably surprise some here, but I think that both the Escape & MKC have among the best exterior design in their respective classes.

            I think that Lincoln did a particularly great job with the exterior of the MKC, and it may very well be the most nicely styled compact premium CUV on the market at present. What makes this more impressive is the fact that they managed to make it far more upscale looking than the Escape, but they didn’t overdo it in terms of excess styling cues for the mere sake of differentiation. It has a very tasteful, upscale exterior.

            Regarding interiors, I find the materials and design of the Escape to be class competitive, but the whole angular theme is present as it is in the Focus & Fiesta, and I prefer a simpler, cleaner aesthetic.

            Here, again, the MKC shines by comparison, with what I’d consider to be a class leading interior design & the use of at least near the top of the class materials, and really nice available color combinations. I even like the gauges and center stack design in the MKC.

            Most people think I’m some sort of crank or shock commenter, who simply rips on anything Ford, but this isn’t the case, as I am critical but fair, and give credit where it’s due, IMO.

            I think Ford has two class leading products on its hand in the MKC and upcoming Mustang (and that the Fusion is class leading in terms of chassis/ride quality and noise suppression in its segment, too, which I often stated), but I have to add some caveats here even as I praise Ford and…gasp….even Lincoln!

            1) I think Ford has severely overpriced many of its products relative to the competition (though they’ve mitigated this to a certain degree by offering some aggressive lease deals). Let us ponder the fact that a 2.3 liter equipped MKC compact crossover can easily exceed $44,000 based on MSRP, and that it really essentially is an Escape under the admittedly attractive sheet metal. That’s crazy, IMO.

            2) I am extremely leery of the long-term reliability of Ford’s/Lincoln’s shared line of Ecoboost motors (this is an important deficit if I’m more correct than not, and if one peruses Consumer Reports Reliability Index, it is a fact that CR data supports my contention, so much so that not a single Ecoboost motor achieves even average reliability, and this has really hurt Ford’s overall reliability rankings according to CR – and CR uses a huge sample size in compiling those rankings).

            3) My experience with Ford dealerships has been dreadful and both Ford & Lincoln suffer from some steep depreciation (in no small part due to the high new vehicle prices Ford/Lincoln set).

            But, with all of that said, I do think Lincoln did a very nice job styling both the exterior & interior of the MKC.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            @ dtremit – I will probably surprise some here, but I think that both the Escape & MKC have among the best exterior design in their respective classes.

            I think that Lincoln did a particularly great job with the exterior of the MKC, and it may very well be the most nicely styled compact premium CUV on the market at present. What makes this more impressive is the fact that they managed to make it far more upscale looking than the Escape, but they didn’t overdo it in terms of excess styling cues for the mere sake of differentiation. It has a very tasteful, upscale exterior.

            Regarding interiors, I find the materials and design of the Escape to be class competitive, but the whole angular theme is present as it is in the Focus & Fiesta, and I prefer a simpler, cleaner aesthetic.

            Here, again, the MKC shines by comparison, with what I’d consider to be a class leading interior design & the use of at least near the top of the class materials, and really nice available color combinations. I even like the gauges and center stack design in the MKC.

            Most people think I’m some sort of crank or shock commenter, who simply rips on anything Ford, but this isn’t the case, as I am critical but fair, and give credit where it’s due, IMO.

            I think Ford has two class leading products on its hand in the MKC and upcoming Mustang (and that the Fusion is class leading in terms of chassis/ride quality and noise suppression in its segment, too, which I often stated), but I have to add some caveats here even as I praise Ford and…gasp….even Lincoln!

            1) I think Ford has severely overpriced many of its products relative to the competition (though they’ve mitigated this to a certain degree by offering some aggressive lease deals). Let us ponder the fact that a 2.3 liter equipped MKC compact crossover can easily exceed $44,000 based on MSRP, and that it really essentially is an Escape under the admittedly attractive sheet metal. That’s crazy, IMO.

            2) I am extremely leery of the long-term reliability of Ford’s/Lincoln’s shared line of Ecoboost motors (this is an important deficit if I’m more correct than not, and if one peruses Consumer Reports Reliability Index, it is a fact that CR data supports my contention, so much so that not a single Ecoboost motor achieves even average reliability, and this has really hurt Ford’s overall reliability rankings according to CR – and CR uses a huge sample size in compiling those rankings).

            3) My experience with Ford dealerships has been dreadful and both Ford & Lincoln suffer from some steep depreciation (in no small part due to the high new vehicle prices Ford/Lincoln set).

            But, with all of that said, I do think Lincoln did a very nice job styling both the exterior & interior of the MKC.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            – @ dtremit – I will probably surprise some here, but I think that both the Escape & MKC have among the best exterior design in their respective classes.

            I think that Lincoln did a particularly great job with the exterior of the MKC, and it may very well be the most nicely styled compact premium CUV on the market at present. What makes this more impressive is the fact that they managed to make it far more upscale looking than the Escape, but they didn’t overdo it in terms of excess styling cues for the mere sake of differentiation. It has a very tasteful, upscale exterior.

            Regarding interiors, I find the materials and design of the Escape to be class competitive, but the whole angular theme is present as it is in the Focus & Fiesta, and I prefer a simpler, cleaner aesthetic.

            Here, again, the MKC shines by comparison, with what I’d consider to be a class leading interior design & the use of at least near the top of the class materials, and really nice available color combinations. I even like the gauges and center stack design in the MKC.

            Most people think I’m some sort of crank or shock commenter, who simply rips on anything Ford, but this isn’t the case, as I am critical but fair, and give credit where it’s due, IMO.

            I think Ford has two class leading products on its hand in the MKC and upcoming Mustang (and that the Fusion is class leading in terms of chassis/ride quality and noise suppression in its segment, too, which I often stated), but I have to add some caveats here even as I praise Ford and…gasp….even Lincoln!

            1) I think Ford has severely overpriced many of its products relative to the competition (though they’ve mitigated this to a certain degree by offering some aggressive lease deals). Let us ponder the fact that a 2.3 liter equipped MKC compact crossover can easily exceed $44,000 based on MSRP, and that it really essentially is an Escape under the admittedly attractive sheet metal. That’s crazy, IMO.

            2) I am extremely leery of the long-term reliability of Ford’s/Lincoln’s shared line of Ecoboost motors (this is an important deficit if I’m more correct than not, and if one peruses Consumer Reports Reliability Index, it is a fact that CR data supports my contention, so much so that not a single Ecoboost motor achieves even average reliability, and this has really hurt Ford’s overall reliability rankings according to CR – and CR uses a huge sample size in compiling those rankings).

            3) My experience with Ford dealerships has been dreadful and both Ford & Lincoln suffer from some steep depreciation (in no small part due to the high new vehicle prices Ford/Lincoln set).

            But, with all of that said, I do think Lincoln did a very nice job styling both the exterior & interior of the MKC.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            dtremit – I posted a lengthy, detailed & specific response to your question of me three times, but WordPress sucked it down the black hole.

            Maybe it will show up with a little more time, and my response will inevitably shock people who assume I reflexively rage against all things Ford/Lincoln.

            In case it does not ever appear, here are cliff notes:

            I think the MKC has the best looking exterior of any compact CUV, premium, non-premium, etc.

            I think the MKC has a class competitive (actually, near the top of the segment) interior design, and feel similarly about the interior materials used, the gauges and center stack, the available color combinations (major kudos), and overall aesthetic.

            In short, it’s a solid triple or inside the ballpark homer, whereas the Escape has a nice exterior, but is less successful in terms of interior execution.

            Lincoln did an excellent job of making the MKC much richer looking,handsome, elegant & premium, in terms of exterior design, than not only the Escape, but much of its segment competing premium compact CUVs.

            I have three caveats:

            1) I think that it is very much overpriced, especially when equipped with the 2.3 liter Ecoboost, with MSRP (regardless as to what actual ATP will be) that can pretty easily broach the $42,000 and even $45,000 price point, which is crazy, and

            2) I do not trust the long-term reliability of any Ford/Lincoln vehicle equipped with an Ecoboost motor (Consumer Reports, which I happen to view as the most credible, though not infallible, source of reliability information, due to the very large sample size data they are able to cull, lends credence to my concerns here, as not a single Ecoboost motor has achieved even an “average” problem rating – IOW, every Ecoboost variant CR has sufficent data on has scored either “worse than average” or “much worse than average,” for nearly 3 years now)., and

            3) Depreciation is likely to be very steep on this brand and type of vehicle (which makes it a better used car proposition, but for the reliability concerns).

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            @ dtremit – I posted a lengthy, detailed & specific response to your question of me three times, but WordPress sucked it down the black hole.

            Maybe it will show up with a little more time, and my response will inevitably shock people who assume I reflexively rage against all things Ford/Lincoln.

            In case it does not ever appear, here are cliff notes:

            I think the MKC has the best looking exterior of any compact CUV, premium, non-premium, etc.

            I think the MKC has a class competitive (actually, near the top of the segment) interior design, and feel similarly about the interior materials used, the gauges and center stack, the available color combinations (major kudos), and overall aesthetic.

            In short, it’s a solid triple or inside the ballpark homer, whereas the Escape has a nice exterior, but is less successful in terms of interior execution.

            Lincoln did an excellent job of making the MKC much richer looking,handsome, elegant & premium, in terms of exterior design, than not only the Escape, but much of its segment competing premium compact CUVs.

            I have three caveats:

            1) I think that it is very much overpriced, especially when equipped with the 2.3 liter Ecoboost, with MSRP (regardless as to what actual ATP will be) that can pretty easily broach the $42,000 and even $45,000 price point, which is crazy, and

            2) I do not trust the long-term reliability of any Ford/Lincoln vehicle equipped with an Ecoboost motor (Consumer Reports, which I happen to view as the most credible, though not infallible, source of reliability information, due to the very large sample size data they are able to cull, lends credence to my concerns here, as not a single Ecoboost motor has achieved even an “average” problem rating – IOW, every Ecoboost variant CR has sufficent data on has scored either “worse than average” or “much worse than average,” for nearly 3 years now)., and

            3) Depreciation is likely to be very steep on this brand and type of vehicle (which makes it a better used car proposition, but for the reliability concerns).

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Like, Holy Mind Blown by WordPress/Matrix/Skynet Wall of Duplicate Posts, Man!!

  • avatar
    Mikein08

    This is like putting lipstick on a pig – the pig looks better
    but it’s still a pig. Lincolns are merely gussied-up Fords, just as
    Mercurys were. There’s NO reason to buy one. Kill Lincoln, do something
    more constructive with that cash. GM should do similar things with
    Cadillac. (GM should have killed Cadillac and kept Pontiac as the
    performance car division. And why is anyone buying a Buick?)

    • 0 avatar
      Halftruth

      Totally agree with that last statement. Pontiac was always sold as GMs sport brand.
      Pontiac could have easily sold the Regal/LaCrosse and the CTS equivalent. It would have looked much better too. The whole chiseled/squared off design language is not a hit with everyone.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Gotta disagree. Even though Cadillac put out a lot of crap for a while, the Cadillac name has a lot of equity in it. It still means something to be a Cadillac.

        Lincoln is the same. Ford has quite a few Crossover/SUV platforms, which are what Lincoln needs to capitalize on. It’s ok to share platforms but gussied up Fords aren’t going to work.

        • 0 avatar

          I’m curious as to why car companies didn’t simply save the old luxury rear wheel drive platforms that were so beloved by police departments and Limo companies.

          Those cars would make a fine base for Lincoln and Cadillac, I would think, and I know a few people on TTAC loved them …

          D

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Even the police like crossovers now. The Explorer Interceptor is doing the business to the police sedans right now.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            They were BOF, and it’s really hard/expensive to make BOF sedans meet current safety standards. Basically, they weren’t selling enough to justify the investment.

          • 0 avatar
            VCplayer

            The Panther platform needed a complete redesign to meet modern car standards, and the old tooling was worn out, so they couldn’t just keep making old ones either. Whatever new RWD platform Ford comes out with, it will be far superior to the 1979 Panther.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            This is only because of the horrible interior layout/ergonmics of the police edition Taurus not because of any real merit of Explorer vs Taurus.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            “This is only because of the horrible interior layout/ergonmics of the police edition Taurus not because of any real merit of Explorer vs Taurus.”

            That’s an incorrect statement. The Explorer has a larger and more convenient cargo area, standard AWD, and can be equipped with the 3.5 EB engine.

            CHP gave it a two thumbs up over the Taurus because of being able to carry 4 officers and all of their gear. Something that would have overloaded the Taurus.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @SC5door The sales numbers back you up; police prefer the available SUVs. For 2013:

            14086 Explorer PI
            13629 Tahoe PPV
            10897 Taurus PI
            4281 Impala Police
            3874 Caprice PPV

            Chrysler doesn’t break out law enforcement sales, but total police registrations in 2013 were reported at 50,923 — leaving a ceiling of about 4000 Chargers.

            (data from http://www.government-fleet.com/channel/law-enforcement/news/story/2014/03/ford-police-interceptor-utility-now-america-s-top-patrol-car.aspx )

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “The Explorer has a larger and more convenient cargo area”

            If you’re referring to cargo area for the passengers, then yes, whatever CHP said notwithstanding. The Taurus is difficult for heavy and tall officers to both enter and sit in with their equipment on (vests, gun belt etc). If you’re 5’8 and 165lb you’re ok driving a Taurus its when you are not the trouble arose, this is what I have been told by three city police officers. The Explorer is more spacious inside and I was told from the second batch of cars onward they would be purchasing the Explorer. The Taurus and Explorer police packages my city uses did come with AWD (but I do not know if this was standard or not) and their models lack EB and instead use I believe the 3.7 V6. I’m also told they are wicked fast, handle exceptionally well, but drink gas, and are constantly in the shop for various things.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      It’s telling that the Cadillac ATS was never intended to be a Cadillac at all, according to none other than Bob Lutz, who confirmed that it was intended to be the new Pontiac G6, before Pontiac was axed pursuant to GM’s bankruptcy.

      And then that brilliant GM executive groupthink kicked in when someone suggested slapping a Cadillac badge on it & trying to sell it for 30% more than originally intended.

      GM incompetence FTL. BOOM!

    • 0 avatar
      jkk6

      I recall the US Govt injecting our dearest tax money into Ford and GM so their brand equity pays itself off in the future supplying domestic cars to an ever consuming American market. I think Lincoln is more than capable of a turn around like Jaguar. Let’s not disown the alcoholic Uncle that used to play the fiddle in Madison Square Garden just yet.

      • 0 avatar
        anomaly149

        Who do ya think oversaw the design and engineering most of Jag’s current model lineup? The XK, XJ, and XF didn’t just spring out of the miasma. (in b4 F-Type, it’s a shortened XK)

        The XE is the first new Jag that isn’t heavily influenced by Dearborn.

    • 0 avatar
      VCplayer

      Ford’s platforms are all very competent at this point, there’s is no reason you can’t build a Lincoln on any of them, they just need to be differentiated with styling/interior/features.

      Cadillac’s problem is that they can’t seem to share platforms or differentiate effectively.

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      After literally decades of poor quality and unreliable products… why is anyone still buying ‘Big 3’ products. After seeing what my parents went through with multiple examples – I went Japanese and never looked back.

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      After literally decades of poor quality and unreliable products… why is anyone still buying ‘Big 3’ products? After seeing what my parents went through with multiple examples – I went Japanese and never looked back. (And have been happy!)

      -Land Cruiser/Acura owner (purchased both used and have provided rock solid reliability for years now!)

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “but to help position the portfolio against those of BMW and Mercedes-Benz at home and in China.”

    China is incredibly important but Fields must learn from Cadillac and realize the world will not take you seriously if you attempt to be the “store brand German car”. Do the exact opposite from zee Germans and innovate something new. Cadillac simply copied what the Germans were doing around MY00 and by the time their products came to market the Germans had moved on. You will not beat VAG/Daimler/BMW here or in China playing their game because you spent twenty years in the wilderness. Here’s your game plan:

    -One REAL CAR with VISIBILITY, a NAME, an available V8, available LWB, and lacking beluga whale styling. Essentially start with what your attempted to do with LS, merge it with the spirit of the last Town Car, and ensure that it DOES NOT SUCK as LS did. We are not building a self destructing German car, we are building a real “American” car. Believe it or not the Chinese like those, they do not want a fake German car because they can already have the real ones (its nice to have a national economy isn’t it?). If your brand succeeds offer this model later in a convertible.

    -Drop the MKZ because its redundant in wake of Fusion. Your entry level near C-segment offering will be the new MKC and it will have a NAME. Said new MKC should offer the HSD system the Zephyr already offers.

    -Continue on with your other Ford cloned fake trucks now with NAMES.

    -Relaunch your brand with the REAL CAR in SWB and LWB configs, the Navi, and three fake trucks in various sizes.

  • avatar
    DIYer

    This is just throwing money at the problem. $5 billion over 5 years, no thinking there. I recall how Ford ruined Jaguar by taking a Ford Contour and making it into a Jaguar X-Type. They’ve done the same to Lincoln, they are just glorified Fords with a higher sticker price.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      5 billion over 5 years has that comfortable, traditional, arbitrary “numbers-pulled-from-our-ass” thing going on that has formed the bane of Lincoln’s incompetent revitalization plans for so long now, though.

      That arbitrariness & incompetence is now a new heritage in and of itself.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I hate to defend Ford here, but Ford essentially saved Jaguar starting in 1987. Jaguar would have been gone a decade ago or more if not for Ford Motor Co. The X-type was simply a poor product decision borne out of attempt to create a cheap volume model for an otherwise expensive division to operate, IMO.

      • 0 avatar
        Aquineas

        I’m ashamed to say I really thought the X-Type was an attractive car and I almost bought one. I’m glad I didn’t; it would have been a big drop in reliability as I was firmly in the Nissan camp back then.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          It was a little small for my taste but yes I too enjoyed its overall styling. Once I saw the transverse under the hood and someone explained to me they were AWD only, I thought yeah this is a future shop queen (even more so than your run-of-the-mill Jag).

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        I might add that the X-Type was derived from Mondeo, as was the Contour. While the Contour did not sell well in the States, the Mondeo has always sold well in Europe, and is considered a good car. It is not a bad starting point any more than an Accord is a bad starting point for a Lexus.

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        Was it really a bad decision? It was Jaguar’s best selling car during it’s whole product run.

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      They should have studied the Cimmaron before going down that road.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I thought they just did this.

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    A couple of questions: They’ve spent $2 Billion already? On what pray tell? If they haven’t spent the lion’s share of that money on engineering, then they’re already on the wrong track. Also, the D6 platform is supposed to service both FWD, RWD, and AWD? Call me skeptical, but I can’t help but feel that fundamentally there are going to be compromises there that are going to affect the final product in trying to make one platform that serves all three. Look Ford, take the 2015 Genesis, tear it apart, clone or exceed the rigidity, refinement, and defect rate, use a revised version of MyTouch, build the body in aluminum, and stick in the 3.5 Ecoboost engine. Charge 42-60K for it, and call it a Town Car. People will flock to Lincoln dealerships in droves. And for Goodness sakes, find a decent plant to build it in.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I essentially agree with you except on the EcoBoost point, EcoBoost should be a Ford only offering, IMO. Just drop N/A V8s or a V6 into anything Lincoln space permitting. You want to build a reputation for quality and reliability, not blow up cars which will be living at the shop twelve months out of warranty.

      • 0 avatar
        Aquineas

        Are the Ecoboost V6s that bad? I just assumed (incorrectly apparently) that they’ve been putting them in trucks for years and would have had the kinks worked out by now. Ah well, maybe scratch the Ecoboost. Coyote V8 then :-).

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I’m not really sure to be quite honest but there’s enough back and forth on them between what people tell me and what I have read I wouldn’t trust it. Lincoln has already set the precedent of offering the better drivetrains in their products vs some of their Ford counterparts. If you’re trying to sell Ford on whiz bang turbo so be it, but I would do just the opposite in Lincoln otherwise why am I buying the Lincoln over the Ford (there the same fracking car after all at the moment). The market seems to agree based on resale valuations.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          The Ecoboost V6s makes a good Lincoln engine. Good power, OK refinement, OK fuel economy. Whether they’re dead solid reliable for 10 years isn’t a concern to Lincoln’s new buyer demographic and it isn’t a qualifier for the lease-heavy luxury market as a whole. If the reliability is good enough for the their volume products, it’ll be satisfactory for Lincoln.

          • 0 avatar
            Aquineas

            Yanno I was going to disagree with you until I considered the long-term reliability of the Big Three German brands. Point-taken. I don’t know if buyers would give Lincoln the same free pass when it comes to reliability that they do Mercedes, BMW, and Audi, however.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Whether they’re dead solid reliable for 10 years isn’t a concern to Lincoln’s new buyer demographic”

            I completely disagree, it seems like many “luxury” cars are basket cases ready to happen. There are many in the “new” demographic who can’t swing new car pricing, but they can swing CPO. If those buyers choose your brand and it turns into a shop queen under warranty, how likely are they to then buy you new as they age and in theory go up the ladder?

            here’s another point:

            “If the reliability is good enough for the their volume products, it’ll be satisfactory for Lincoln”

            Ford isn’t going to be on the chopping block, they can afford to screw up a model or drivetrain and the brand won’t fold because of it. Lincoln cannot afford to mess anything up. Lincoln needs to be better than Ford in every way, not about the same, otherwise there is no point.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            Thing is, the Ford GTDI V6 engines aren’t that bad. They really aren’t bad in the grand scheme of things at all. They’d work well for Lincoln.

            You’re right that many luxury cars are repair and maintenance time-bombs, but that doesn’t stop them from selling in droves as new or CPO. As long as these customer gets a loaner and HJ, it’s not particularly a big deal to them.

            4th hand buyers who want to buy them 8 years down the road might be upset about it, but the OEM doesn’t care much about them, and is happy to sell them the parts. Their motivation is to equip their luxury cars with the latest and greatest to out-spect the competition and move new metal.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I think V6 GTDI reliability is far down on the list of concerns with Lincoln. I worry about it less than any of the I4 GTDIs.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @danio

            I’m certainly not representative of a typical car buyer, but I could step into most CPO’d anything from a financial standpoint. So playing devil’s advocate lets say I’m a guy like me minus the additional cars. If I buy the CPO Lincoln and its in the shop 6-10 times a year I’m going to be pissed off for reasons of my inconvenience of time alone. Again in my average mind which is better, the multiple shop trips in a Lincoln or a Mercedes for similar of even CPO money? If I’m resigned to a owning shop queen, why am I buying a second tier pseudo luxury brand? If the brand is going to win me over, the CPO needs to be an effortless and enjoyable period; it should model the Lexus experience. Whether this includes turbo or N/A GDI I suppose is up for debate, but as product architect I am leaning toward the K.I.S.S. principle for the most part. As I said Lincoln is not in a position to make a mistake, zee Germans can defaecate all over their victims, err customers, all day and they’ll come back for more.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            28-

            I would say the Lincoln CPO program experience is above average. Unlike the Germans, they actually cover things like the Navigation system/Radio, and there is a lot less exclusions.

            The Lincoln CPO warranty is also typically longer than the Lexus CPO warranty. It depends on the age of the car. I’m sure the service is better with Lexus though. They have that part down.

            I wouldn’t expect a V6 GTDI engined vehicle to be a shop queen.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            I’m just playing devil’s advocate I have no idea what the current situation is with the dealers or the brand’s programs. Since they are Fords I imagine the reliability is just as Danio suggested, on par with Ford. I say it should be better than Ford, in theory other than regular maintenance I should never need a shop visit. Building confidence in the Lincoln brand specifically is one step to improving overall resale and increasing the brand’s new car status. Otherwise they will simply remain great used cars who screw their owners or those looking to buy out the lease. If they want to build a lease only brand that’s fine but I think its foolish. Lincoln should be the best Ford has to offer, become an American Lexus. Comments such as “this is just like my mom/dad/friend/wife/inlaw’s Ford” doom you to jet-setter buyers and whatnot.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            28-

            I agree. The best thing about a new Lincoln vehicle right now is that you can get it 60% off MSRP in two to three years. It doesn’t matter how good the CPO program is if there isn’t value in the new vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            I completely agree, but its a bit of the chicken and the egg. You can’t have an effective CPO program without resale, but you need demand to want to CPO it in order to in part keep up resale.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      $1.5 billion is about what an automaker needs to do the 1G Genesis (new RWD platform, new V8, new transmission, etc.), so $2 billion was not going to go far if Lincoln went that route since it had to cover a revamp of Lincoln’s entire lineup and add a new model or 2.

      The $$ went into the MKZ, the MKC, refreshed Navigator and the upcoming new MKX, MKS and MKT.

      Basically enough to keep Lincoln competitive (with say, Acura and the FWD Lexus models).

      Ford had to amass its war chest (still owes billions) before they could invest more heavily in Lincoln.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Lincoln wouldn’t have needed a new V8 or new transmission. They have the Coyote and a RWD transmission (plus V8s and RWD transmissions in development). I have no idea if the S550 platform can or cannot be stretched. Either way, fielding competitive CUVs was a better business plan than a RWD sedan. Hopefully the RWD sedan makes its was into the budget though.

    • 0 avatar
      VCplayer

      Ford has spent well, $2 billion isn’t that much in automaker terms, especially for the luxury tier.

      Lincolns are already MUCH better cars than they were 3-4 years ago. Yeah, they aren’t where they need to be yet, but they’ve made excellent progress per their investment so far.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    They have really just GOT to get away from the platform sharing. They wanna charge as much as BMW, and sell you something on the same platform as in the Ford showroom – doesn’t cut it. The exterior modifications are never far enough, and you can always tell. Lincoln wants the German sales numbers without the effort.

    Show me the pleeb sedan based on the 5-Series. Or the 3-Series. Or the E-Class. It doesn’t exist, so why should Lincoln be able to get away with it? Same with Cadillac and their use of Impala platforms.

  • avatar
    jimble

    They might have some luck positioning the brand against Buick. BMW and Mercedes, not so much.

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      They could bring back Jill Wagner.

      “You gotta put Lincoln on your list!”

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        VIDEO: Jim Carrey Channels Matthew McConaughey in ‘SNL’ Lincoln Ad Spoof

        http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/video-jim-carrey-channels-matthew-mcconaughey-snl-lincoln/story?id=26471552

        Ads for Lincoln Motors featuring Oscar-winner Matthew McConaughey got the “Saturday Night Live” spoof treatment, and the skits — featuring Jim Carrey — have got people laughing all over the Internet.

        In the first video, Carrey as McConaughey can be seen driving in a Lincoln MKC. He parodies McConaughey’s pronounced drawl and much of his dialogue, but he makes a few modifications.

        “Sometimes you’ve got to go back to actually move forward, and I don’t mean go back and reminisce or chase ghosts, I mean take a big step back like go from winning an Oscar to doing a car commercial,” Carrey says. “My agent was like, ‘I could understand if you did this right after ‘The Lincoln Lawyer.’ That would have made sense. But you don’t buy a Lincoln ’cause it makes sense. You do it ’cause you love it — or ’cause you’re an Uber driver.”

        Have Jimmy Fallon curate some more Lincoln tweets, and, call it a come back.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I wonder how closely related this is to the Mustang platform. Hopefully not at all as that platform is horrible at space efficiency, which is a problem for GM’s Alpha platform.

    Looking at what’s become of the Mustang, I feel like they should have just slapped an IRS on the old one, SN95 Cobra style, and made the real new one based on this new platform. Seems a little weird to have 2 RWD platforms with such overlap, and the current Mustang one is not versatile enough for what Lincoln needs.

    Hopefully they drop the stupid alphanumerics as well.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It would be a stretched Mustang platform. Or asis for a Mark coupe. If by “space inefficient”, you mean the long hood and front axle pushed forward, that’s what give a car “driving feel”. Or puts the driver close to mid wheelbase. That’s no different than BMW, Audi and Merc autos.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        We do know that MKS is going to Flat Rock…….if that’s an indication of anything. Of course I did hear that MKS was going to CD2.

        Long long ago I heard of a Lincoln Mustang….haven’t heard of much of it since.

        • 0 avatar
          dtremit

          Flat Rock is well equipped to run two unrelated platforms — heck, until last year it was building the Mustang and the Mazda 6. So I’m not sure I’d read much into it.

  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    they need to take the mustang platform, give it two more doors, keep the hatch, and go BMW 3 series hunting. The Mustang AS IT SITS will eat a 3 series. A last Gen Boss 302 will rip an M3 well enough to disturb the ‘product’ in the M3 driver’s hair. The chassis is already sorted, and now has IRS, too.

    Why OH WHY isn’t Lincoln taking advantage of this and getting some performance chops? An M3 eater that undercuts an M3 by $15k AND it comes with a proper V8 rumble? Where the actual [email protected]& do I sign?

    The Euro brands flourished into a place of performance market dominance in the Malaise Era. They’ve lost actual dominance of power superiority, but not the prominence afforded by the branding strategy. It would be nice to see Lincoln grow a pair and ruffle some feathers as a first shot across the bow of everyone else.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It has been suggested that the new Mustang platform isn’t suited for 4-doors, so at most, might see a Lincoln coupe, but that’s such a niche market and Lincoln would be better off concentrating on CUVs and sedans 1st.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Sounds like they’re copying Lexus. A couple bespoke platforms (LS, GS, IS) and a few shared with the parent division. Could work, but only if (A)The quality is top-notch, (B) They pursue the best of their design themes fearlessly.

  • avatar

    Town Car

  • avatar
    JMII

    How about just shut the whole thing down and put that $5B to work on Ford. Like fixing MyTouch? Because $5B to swap out some plastic logos on grills and trunks seems like overkill.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      MFT hasn’t been an issue since 2011, maybe 2012.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Here’s how I’d spend the 5 billion on Lincoln (assuming I thought that (a) I had to, and/or (b) it would stand a decent statistical chance of improving Lincoln’s viability long-term):

      1) Design Lincoln unique motors that are not available in Ford products. This *could* potentionally allow for using the excellent Coyote, but even that would have to be differentiated enough in terms of objective improvement over the Ford version in terms of power, refinement & NVH characteristics to the point of advertising it truthfully as a Lincoln exclusive motor.

      2) Develop a Lincoln exclusive suspension that at least rivaled, or better yet exceeded, the ride comfort that Lexus’s former air suspension setup allowed for (this would have to be reliable, durable, and would be offered on Lincoln’s luxury oriented vehicles as a stand alone option at a reasonable price). No, the current Lincoln comfort suspension (mode) offering doesn’t come close to achieving this.

      3) Ensure that all Lincoln’s have Lincoln requisite rear legroom, shoulder room, head room and seat comfort (rivaling or exceeding Volvo). If this can’t be accomplished because of platform sharing, it’s not good enough to be a Lincoln, period. Kill it.

      4) Ensure that Lincoln interiors are aesthetically 2 or 3 cuts better than Ford ones, and incorporate only real wood, real metals (NO FAUX PLASTIC METAL), the highest grain leather standard, and industry best gauge clusters.

      5) Do the opposite of BMW & Lexus in terms of HVAC, audio, and other component controls, and simplify, simplify, simplify them, to the point that one really need not study any manual to set cabin temperature, stream audio, adjust audio settings, setup Bluetooth or accomplish any other technological function that is consistent with what 95% of customers deem essential or important. This is not confirmation that one’s customer base is not tech savvy or intelligent, but an effort to make their life easier and to ensure the learning curve to utilize these features is minimal.

      6) Offer better than Lexus customer service, with a no questions asked, headache free 10 year/100,000 mile transferable (to 2nd owners) comprehensive warranty (this will minimize depreciation on pre-owned Lincolns, and help support residual values on new ones).

      • 0 avatar
        jrasero23

        DeadWeight is just a domestic brand hating troll

        1. I disagree with the exclusive motors to a degree. I think some cross platforming is required to balance the budget. There is nothing wrong with offering the 2.3 Ecooboost in the Mustang and sharing it with the MKZ/MKC but giving us the 2.0 which is found on the mainstream Fusion and sharing it with a MKZ and MKC is stupid because buyers have no reason to truly upgrade. If you give us a Ford motor for Lincoln at least give us the top of the line Ford motor for a Lincoln base model.

        2. The suspension mode isn’t bad and for my taste (more cushion like ride) it does a good job. I understand there is a fine line between a cushion like ride in the ES and the more punching bag like experience of an IS, so yes Lincoln needs to establish better distinct characteristics for certain models but overall the quality of the ride is on par with Lexus.

        3. Your comment is common irony. Many people want the old Lincoln with huge amounts of leg room and interior room but there are others that want Lincoln to other rival the Germans with more conforming interiors but with more luxurious touches. You can’t have it both ways. Lincoln can’t make a LS competitor and make a IS competitor, they just don’t have the resources even with this 5 Billion dollar influx of money. So yes the MKZ had to play many hats. It had to do a little of everything and that’s why many found it be so underwhelming

        4. This is one of the biggest misnomers. Lincoln’s do have quality interiors. Could they be better yes, but most cars could. They do have real metal and real wood in them. If your talking about personal taste and having Lincoln look more like a BMW than yeah Lincoln needs to steup their game, but quality wise there smacked right in the middle between Acura and Lexus.

        5. The Lincoln MyTouch is bad but not as bad as many say it is. As you see on the MKC and new Navigator Lincoln has gone back to knobs. I think their system is fine BUT if Lincoln to be better they should have iOS and Android systems loaded in.

        6. The Lincoln warranty defiantly could be better but the service I have received has been better than any Acura or Lexus dealer I have been too. A course this has to do a lot with what dealer you go to and hopefully some of that 5 billion will go to balancing out showrooms and service departments. 10 years is a bit crazy, this isn’t a Hyundai. The warranty is transferable already.

    • 0 avatar
      Zoom

      Really tired of the “badge engineering” hyperbole. How many models are truly badge engineered anymore? Basically everything you see is different, save for some switch gear. Sheet metal, lights, glass, wheels, interior, etc. That’s not “badge engineering”.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Lincolns are Fords with different badges.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The don’t share much sheetmetal anymore, but they are tarted up Fords.

          For anyone that expected anything different, I ask you why? Lincoln’s have been Fords with different badges forever. It’s never going to change. No matter what they do, Lincoln products will share underpinnings with Ford products. FOR EV ER.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I agree.

            Mark Shields has a tough road to climb. Mulally really would have turned Lincoln into Ford Titanium had he not been departing.

            I love how Lincoln spokespeople have adopted the trendy “modular architecture” speak.

            I remember when Kyree was trying to argue that the Ford Escape & Lincoln MKC weren’t the same vehicle because of some Ford turning of words claiming that the MKC had an extra inch of interior width at some point in the rear (due to some sleight of hand scalloping or whatever).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The MKC and the Escape are basically the same vehicle. FoMoCo made them feel different and did alter the MKC to make it wider and lower. It’s more different than the MKS is to the Taurus or the MKX is to the Edge, but that isn’t saying a whole lot.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Not anymore.

          Or at least not anymore than Acuras are with Hondas and some Lexus and Infiniti models are with Toyotas and Nissans.

          The “rebadge” job is limited to the Navigator, but that also holds true for the Lexus and Infiniti BoF SUVs.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The sheetmetal and interiors are different, yes. Ford still needs to better differentiate Lincoln from Ford though. The MKC and next MKZ are the right direction. Although the Escape and MKC are very similar, they feel much different. Kinda like the Tiguan and Q3.

        • 0 avatar
          Firestorm 500

          @ Deadweight: Cadillacs are Chevrolets and Buicks with different badges.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Not the ATS, CTS and forthcoming CT6 and CT8 and the Omega based CUV.

            And even the Escalade is a lot more differentiated from its GMC/Chevy cousins than the Lexus, Infiniti and Lincoln SUVs are from their Toyota, Nissan and Ford cousins.

  • avatar
    duckccc

    while all of the comments above are right on, the reality is that Ford’s first priority with any spare cash is to spend it on the hyper-competitive segments it’s best at—the F-Series, crossovers, mid-size sedans.

    F-Series alone probably generates more profits for Ford in one year than Lincoln’s cumulative profits since 2001.

  • avatar
    readallover

    I always thought they should have built the Aussie Ford Falcon here as a Lincoln.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    How about they just build a Lincoln? A big, comfortable car that older upper-middle class men drive to the golf course and to their doctors office?

  • avatar
    STRATOS

    Ford should let Lincoln brand rest in peace.We really don’t need any more badge engineering.All the marketing in the world will not help.They should have learned a few things from Jaguar and Aston Martin instead of just being bean counters.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It’s not “badge engineering” (see Acura and the FWD Lexus lineup) and what Ford is planning to do with Lincoln going forward is similar to VW and Audi.

    • 0 avatar
      jkk6

      @STRATOS I wonder what’s easier cutting a toe off or growing one?

      Even harder. How do you cut off a toe when you have already ran out of toes to cut off and let’s not resort to finger amputations.

      Sincerely though, I see everyone on this thread as patriots “trying” to promote nationalism by wrapping their thoughts into this.

      And personally my affections for Lincoln started with a 88 TC bought in 02 for $500 when our family came back to the states. 7 passenger bench seats and V8 powah saved my dignity in high school too. Some qualities I miss in modern cars. Slow work day =/

  • avatar
    jeoff

    I think that this is primarily a strategy to win in China and survive in the US. “Tarted up Fords” –whatever. Lincoln should be unrecognizable as Fords and designed to Chinese tastes, whatever they are– push button transmissions? Giant sunroofs? Tons of legroom in the backseat? Whatever the Chinese want, that is what Lincoln should be. Whatever it sells in the US should be considered a bonus.

  • avatar
    TW5

    How did Lexus build a US luxury brand? With the LS400 flagship.

    You can’t build/rebuild a luxury brand with nickel-and-dime volume nameplates. First establish potency. Cadillac and Lincoln are both struggling with the same problem: attempting to leverage brand equity from 50 years ago.

    Lincoln should focus on the Navigator, imo. It seems counter-intuitive, but the US is seen as the land of trucks, and the Chinese and Indian markets are hot for SUVs. If Lincoln builds the best luxury SUV (i.e. Range Rover interior quality, but American stature and reliability), the athlete/entertainer demographic will latch on in the US, and foreign customers will buy the car for its US roots. To make it work, the new Navigator must be stupid. Name brand accoutrement, wine cooler, climate control system that turns down to 40-degrees, home theater system, and whatever nonsense you can imagine. Make it a rolling executive suite, without the bathroom.

    Then start working on the Continental to convince customers that Americans can still build luxury sedans, as well.

  • avatar
    tedward

    5 billion dollars? About damn time. Everyone seems to be taking the position that the brand has been in a holding pattern for these last couple of years. What I see is an entire generation of Lincolns which are no better than trim level Ford products. The American public has been sold this strategy before, is aware of it, and seems to have roundly rejected it as a long term proposition. I honestly think they would have been better off selling nothing at all than what they’ve been doing lately (yeah yeah I know that’s not realistic.)

    Now if only Acura would follow suit (assuming Lincoln is actually going to differentiate product here.)

  • avatar

    It would be nice if American car were actually built on a US platform. This “not invented here” policy is getting tiresome.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Ford’s platforms are so global now it is difficult to figure out the percentage of development by country. The Fusion has way more American DNA in it than one may think, while Ford Mexico had a lot to do with the refresh of the Expedition/Navigator.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    $5 billion is enough. It cost $3.5 billion to get the global Ranger to market. How much is the new F Series costing? $6, $8 or even $10 billion?

    Maybe the “One Ford” when you don’t have a “One Ford” vehicles could be used for Lincoln.

    Update the Falcon and sell it as a Lincoln. The Everest, sell it as a Lincoln. These are Ford vehicles that aren’t in the US.

    I do think Lincoln will have issues. Sell it to the Chinese.

  • avatar
    GranMarkeez

    So if I read this correctly the MKZ and the MKT will not see redesigns until 2019. Where does this leave the Ford Fusion which will be absolutely geriatric by then? Will the MKT which should properly be put out of its misery be allowed to languish till then?

    And of course the shared platform thing again. Too many people see Lincoln as little more than a gussied up Ford as it is. There’s little here to distinguish a brand that desperately needs distinguishing.

    I’m not sure LMC is doing the right thing here.

    • 0 avatar
      dtremit

      I don’t follow you on the Fusion. The MKZ/Fusion both debuted in MY2013. A total replacement for MY2019 would be pretty average — six model years. The previous-gen Camry went for 5, and the current one just got a facelift in its fourth model year. Previous-gen Fusion went for 9 model years with one refresh.

      I think Ford is a little unsure about what to do with the Flex and the MKT. It sounds like the 2016 Explorer refresh is pretty much cosmetic, which means they can likely keep building them at not much cost.

  • avatar
    ceipower

    $5 Billion or 10, it can’t be done. That ship has sailed. The best they can hope for is Lincoln taking the place of Mercury as the better,fancier Ford. Even that’s a stretch.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      That’s already occurred. They suffer from the same problems Cadillac does: legacy dealer network, product which has been lost for ten or more years, and a push for too much sales volume. Becoming Mercury and producing slightly reconfigured Fords on the same lines as Fords probably allows the brand to be cost effective, if not profitable, while soaking up any additional Ford plant capacity. I’m not sure if Mercury was ever profitable in and of itself, but it was cost effective and served to eat up excess capacity while simultaneously funding another distribution channel. This model would not longer work which is why Mercury was axed but Mullaly fell short of killing the Lincoln brand and its legacy distribution network. So in effect what really happened was Lincoln -as it was- fell and its corpse simply morphed into Mercury to continue the old model as best it could. I think the best case scenario for FoMoCo is to adopt a Lexus model as a commentator suggested above, some models shared (or copied) from the mother brand, some models more unique to the brand. The only other thing I would do in Mr Field’s shoes is merge the two distribution channels once and for all to sell both Ford and Lincoln branded vehicles under one roof. The superfluous Lincolns I think will sell as what they are, upscale Fords, while the more unique Lincoln models could actually help draw people into the combined showroom.

      • 0 avatar
        jrasero23

        They have always targeted themselves as a Lexus alternative but they never had anything that was as good or defiantly better. Lexus has now moved into more performance cars and I think Lincoln has woken up and sees they can’t just be a Ford trim level or the next Mercury. The scary thing is timing. the next true Lincoln will not be out until maybe 2019 but until that time that is 4-5 years of middling sales and people jumping over to the Germans. In my opinion stop going after Lexus. Use Buick or Dodge as your cornerstones. Either do affordable luxury that really makes you question if “X” car is worth “X” amount more or go Dodge and putout cars that reflect Lincolns heritage an performance, hence the Lincoln MKR maybe with a 2.7-3.0 Ecoboost engine.

        • 0 avatar
          dtremit

          I really don’t understand why Lincoln doesn’t at least have a performance *trim* available on its existing models. All the pieces are in place:

          In most cases, the Lincoln already has a power edge over the Ford — the MKC’s 2.3L isn’t available on the Escape; the MKS has the SHO engine, and I’m guessing the new MKX will offer the 3.5L EcoBoost as an option.

          They already have models on the Ford side like the Edge Sport and Explorer Sport with fairly distinctive appearances, so the concept isn’t foreign. A blacked out whale grille would be a really nice option on most of Lincoln’s current models.

          And Lincoln has an established performance nameplate — LSC — though it’s been dormant for a long while.

          Just need to put ’em together. Come on, Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      fourthreezee

      This.
      Lots of ‘claim chowder’ from Ford and the supposed “B&B” in this article. Kinda makes me wonder if any of them were alive during the decades of crap Ford et. al. forced on us. At any rate – the market has spoken. No amount of $$ will help. The patient is has been neglected and starting to reach room temperature.

      /rant

      You may begin your flaming gentlemen – but the ‘claim chowder’ will be tasty when this comes to pass.

  • avatar
    JaySeis

    Grow the China biz and grow it well. Makes everything else easier.

  • avatar
    jetcal1

    I don’t have a monkey in this circus, but gotta’ ask;
    With all the negative opinions expressed here; How many of us could look at a successful revamp with unbiased eyes and acknowledge it?
    //rant off//

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Lincoln needs to die. 5 billion in life support is a waste of money. Lincoln only means something to anyone over 50 years old. The old saying is “you can sell a young car to old people but not an old car to young people”. Lincoln as a brand sends out the same signals as Geritol or Depends.
    Ford will not be able to buy the snob appeal of Mercedes Benz or BMW. People buy premium brands to project an image. Lincoln does not carry any brand weight any more.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    I wonder how Mulally feels about this. (Not good, I suppose.)

    I do think that he was on the right track with the sell-what-you-can-with-minimal-investment strategy. It isn’t glorious or anything to brag about at parties, but it doesn’t bleed money, either.

    At this point, Lincoln is too far behind to compete with the Germans, and the writing is on the wall for the uber-sedan market, anyway. Focus on the Range Rover Evoques, Mercedes GLKs and Audi Q’s, instead; at least there, they might have a fighting chance. (I’d also figure out to make something decent from the new Mustang platform, which I’m pretty sure is already in the works.)

  • avatar
    probert

    Not sure I understand – Both Ford and Lincoln will share the D6 platform that is designed to make lincoln distinct from ford. My head hurts.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    DTREMIT – I have tried to respond to your questions at least 5 times (detailed, complete responses), but for whatever, TTAC/WordPress is destroying every response I submit thus far.

    Very frustrating situation…hope it gets resolved one day.

  • avatar
    GranMarkeez

    Fusion will be antiquated compared to its competition before 2019. Although you are right about refresh cycles.

  • avatar
    jrasero23

    This is the answer to all the anti Lincoln critics since Ford is finally giving Lincoln more money and the opportunity to make RWD cars. The problem for me is timing. At this point Lincoln is extremely tied up in the MKZ and MKC. The MkZ sells maybe 2100 units a month and the MKC 1700 units. That just isn’t enough. That’s not to say the MKZ or MKC are bad cars but in a ultra competitive luxury market Lincoln hasn’t given people what they wanted but what they thought consumers wanted. Finally allowing RWD to be infused into Lincoln cars and aiming at the Germans means that Lincoln will be focusing heavily on dynamics and performance. This is Lincoln’s last shot no two ways about it. If they can’t get out a decent selling car by 2019 the brand is dead. I wish you the best and I hope the re-stylized Lincoln cars can hold people over until Lincoln performance is reborn

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • sgeffe: Or the aftermarket will come up with a way, in the form of a doohickey which plugs into the OBD II port, as...
  • sgeffe: The Malibu is about the worst, with the Equinox second. When I’m walking to/from my work lot to my office,...
  • HotPotato: Having solar on your roof makes you MORE resilient if the power goes off (if you’re smart enough to...
  • HotPotato: Translation: California is paying me a fat union retirement pension, and I’m saying thank you by...
  • AthensSlim: When I renewed last summer (‘19) there was no option to renew without also ordering a new plate for my...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber