By on October 13, 2014

2013 Honda Civic sedanHappy Canadian Thanksgiving. Around turkey-laden tables across the country today, Canadians will utter their thanks for family, cranberry sauce, the Saskatchewan Roughriders, warm socks, and Honda Civics.

In each of the last 16 years – a streak which began in 1998 – the Civic has been Canada’s best-selling passenger car. If Honda Canada stopped selling the Civic now, the lead built up by this hugely popular nameplate would nearly be sufficient for the Civic to end 2014 as Canada’s best-selling car.

For a vehicle which suffered declining sales following the heydays of the eighth-generation car between 2006 and 2008, when Honda sold an average of 71,000 per year, 2014 is looking especially bright. Honda sold fewer than 59,000 Civics per year, on average, between 2009 and 2011 but has topped 64,000 units in each of the last two years. Whether Honda sells 69,000 or 71,000 Civics in 2014, we know the figure will result in at least a six-year high.

51,936 Civics have been sold during 2014’s first nine months, an 8% year-over-year improvement.

Yet Canada’s passenger car market is down 1% over the span of 2014’s first nine months. As a result, the Civic’s share of the car market has improved, noticeably so. 8.6% of the cars sold in Canada this year have been Civics, up from 7.9% at the three-quarter mark a year ago. When Honda sold 72,463 Civics in 2008, the Civic was responsible for 8.2% of the car market, and cars accounted for 54.3% of the overall new vehicle market. Traditional passenger cars generate 42.3% of the industry’s volume in 2014.

The total number of Civics sold in Canada in 2014 exceeds the number of cars sold by Ford and Lincoln and is nearly double the number of car sales reported by the Chrysler Group.

The story is pertinent at this time not because of Thanksgiving but because, in September, the Civic was also Canada’s second-best-selling vehicle overall, well back of the all-conquering Ford F-Series but ahead of the usual number two, Ram’s truck lineup. This marked the first such occasion since October of last year.

The Civic was Canada’s top-ranked vehicle line in 2008, but Canada’s taste for full-size pickup trucks has accelerated since then, rising from 190,000 units in calendar year 2008 (11.6% of the overall industry) to 242,000 units in just the first nine months of 2014, equal to 17% of the industry’s total new vehicle sales volume.

How does this compare with U.S. results? Consider the midsize Camry, America’s perennial best-selling car. 5.5% of the passenger cars sold in 2014 have been Camrys, but cars are more favoured in the growing U.S. market, accounting for 48.7% of the overall market. Full-size trucks generate just 12.1% of the industry’s volume.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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27 Comments on “9% Of Canadians Are Thankful For Their Civics...”


  • avatar
    thelaine

    Happy Thanksgiving, Canadians. May you always live in a free and prosperous (and polite) nation.

    • 0 avatar
      jjster6

      Free my A$$!!! Marketing boards control the dairy products supply, in Quebec you can only put out a sign in French, and beer sales are controlled by a monopoly of the brewers (not the government as the beer companies would have us believe). And that’s just a sampling of our Canadian “freedoms.”

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Happy Thanksgiving, Canada! Wow, you get like 70 shopping days ’til Christmas

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Drop ze puck, and many happy The Beer Store runs, too, eh?

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      @DeadWeight… Right, its a holiday eh. No Beer Store today. Gotta grab a couple of “two fours” on Saturday eh!

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        I understood everything you said and I don’t even speak Canadian

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Is “Beer Store” a real business, or is that what they call the liquor store?

        Better run to the cash point first.

        • 0 avatar
          jjster6

          The Beer Store is a real business. Major outlet for beer in Ontario. Owned 48% by Molsons, 48% by Labatt’s, and the rest a smattering of smaller brewers (my numbers aren’t perfect but darn close). Liquor and wine can only be purchased at Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) stores run by the government (they sell a limited selection of beer too).

          Some grocery stores have LCBO outlets in them for wine too. A very small number of other outlets as well.

          99% of beer, liquor, or wine sales through Ontario go through the Beer Store or the LCBO. Even bars and restaurants have to buy from them.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            So this is only for Ontario, and each province has their own liquor board for sales?

            I thought the US was restrictive on liquor, but this seems moreso.

  • avatar

    I know a lot of Vancouverites who are very thankful today; the Whitecaps beat the Sounders for the Cascadia Cup Friday night.

    It was also my first time at an MLS match.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    I believe Canada requires snow tires so Canadians can deal w/ snow and still get good mpg.

    Too bad there isn’t some sort of education campaign in the US, i.e., proper tires are more important than awd.

    • 0 avatar
      jjster6

      The provinces, like a state in the USA, set those laws. To my knowledge, only Quebec requires snow tires. Ontario tried the same thing but it got shot down. Mandatory snow tires are a very dumb idea. Ontario is bigger than many countries. In the far north the weather makes snow tires and 4X4’s mandatory. Southern Ontario is further south than Nothern California. Just stupid to make one law to try to govern snow tires in that wide an area.

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        >>Southern Ontario is further south than Nothern California.<<

        And they still get plenty of ice and snow.

        Germany actually mandates snow tires and fines you doubly if you get caught speeding or have an accident.

        The point is that awd is not adequate in snow and ice w/o proper tires.

        • 0 avatar
          jjster6

          @ thornmark;

          “The point is that awd is not adequate in snow and ice w/o proper tires.”

          In your opinion! Show me scientific data that the number of accidents goes down when everyone uses snow tires. Cars perform better in the snow with snow tires but that does not mean accidents go down!!! People just drive at higher speeds. I’m not convinced making everyone deal with the hassle of snow tires makes everyone safer.

          Especially when we all know that “speed kills.” Yeah right.

      • 0 avatar
        bosozoku

        >Southern Ontario is further south than Northern California

        Might be technically true, but just barely. And Northern California has the mild Pacific currents and a lack of lake effect anything to moderate its climate. Not an apt comparison.

        • 0 avatar
          jjster6

          Ever been to Windsor, ON? Last year was an anomaly, but most years it sees only a couple of inches (centimeters?) of snow. I don’t need a government bureaucrat telling me what tires my car needs from December to March.

          What if I want to drive south? What if it doesn’t snow. What if I have a Jeep Rubicon – do I need to take off those tires to put on a snow tires?

          Please. I can handle driving a car. I have many accident free years of driving in Northern Ontario to prove it. Most of it done with rear wheel drive, no snow tires, no ABS, no traction control or any other electronic safety nannies.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            @jjster6…I live on the North shore of lake Ontario. I’ve seen winters where the snow shovel rusts away in my garage. Winter tires are a complete waste of money.

      • 0 avatar
        STRATOS

        Snow tires are also mandatory in Italy.There are many warm climate countries with mountains.

    • 0 avatar
      Jon Fage

      We don’t get MPG in Canada. We get l/100 km.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Have a Jakeman’s maple cookie in celebration!

    (Those are very delicious and I have yet to find them round here, and I am not paying Amazon prices.)

  • avatar
    Brumus

    Yeah, Quebec is messed up in certain ways…but at least we don’t have that appalling anachronism known as the Beer Store.

    Just picked up a case of holiday beer at the grocery store beside my place for $29. Sadly, that’s a good price in Canada.

    Oh, and the Riders suck!

  • avatar
    mikey

    @Brumus…My Canada will always include Quebec. Quarts of beer, and some of the best looking girls you will find anywhere.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Not one post on the subject. Not surprising, its presence impinges not on the human brain. It’s merely part of the backdrop from leafy rural Maritime farms through the heartland over Big Sky country and crawling through the Rockies. “It was a small car, Officer.” “Uh HQ? Smith here. Look out for a Civic.”

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