By on September 19, 2014

Cadillac-Elmiraj-concept-front-450x256

Cadillac confirmed that a rear-drive flagship would go into production next year at GM’s Detroit-Hamtramck assembly plant.

In a statement released to the media, Cadillac boss Johan De Nysschen said

“The objective for this upcoming model is to lift the Cadillac range by entering the elite class of top-level luxury cars. Currently in development, this new rear wheel drive-oriented sedan uses completely new, custom-designed materials on a unique vehicle architecture.”

Riding on the all-new Omega rear-drive platform, the car will be unveiled in the first half of 2015. Styling is said to be inspired by the Elmiraj show car that won critical acclaim at its 2013 debut at Pebble Beach.

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116 Comments on “Cadillac’s RWD Flagship Is Going Into Production...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Now bring back the ducks on the crest and the wreath to surround it or forever be haunted by the ghost of Antoine Laumet de La Mothe, sieur de Cadillac!

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    The question is: what V8 will they put in it? Flagship vehicles demand it, but GM doesn’t have a “premium” V8 on the shelf to drop in.

    A fettled, sound-proofed LT?

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      The 6.2 liter GDI “ecotec” engine develops something like 420 hp and 450 lb.-ft of torque, as installed in GM’s half-ton pickup trucks. Using the 6-speed automatic transmission and pushing an un-aerodynamic vehicle weighing over 5,000 lbs., it achieves better than 20 mpg on the highway and, with the part-time 4wd system engaged, will launch the truck to 60 mph in the mid 5 second range.

      Having driven one, I will also say that it is impressively quiet in that application and its cylinder deactivation system is seamless. The new 8-speed transmission that is being sold with the 2015 models should improve acceleration and fuel economy a bit.

      I would say that this engine is fully ready for luxury car duty. Compared to the similar engine in the Corvette, this one has been “de-tuned” for less peak horsepower and a broader torque curve — entirely appropriate for use in a luxury car, where the engine is to be felt and not heard.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        The engine in the C7 is superb – for the Vette. However, at idle there is a bit of shake. Perfectly appropriate for the Stingray, for the Cadillac not so much. I’d imagine it could be tuned to be smoother and most likely weaker. But the tech snobs will roll their eyes at the pushrods. Perception is everything in cars of this class, even if the reality is irrelevant.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Screw the tech snob peonry. In the rarefied world of LuxoCaddies and top of the line Bentleys, Pushrods rule…..

          Another thought: Per cursory comparison of size and weight between the LT1 and the late, great(est?) AMG 6.3, an LT1 x 1.5, aka pushrod V12, ought not to be too far ex possible…… I bet cost wouldn’t be out of line with a newly developed DOHC 8 of MB like refinement, either…

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      There is a problem with GMs V8 engines?

      I’m sure GM can get the powertrain right, I’m not sure about everything else.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Agreed bball. Great powertrains in “meh” vehicles is sort of a GM hallmark.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Based on the ATS and CTS – Cadillac has been getting the steering/handling/ride combo right (or more so than anyone else in those segments).

        But yeah, they need to get the other things right (esp. efficient use of space) – but I suspect that the flagship will be an improvement on the CTS which was an improvement on the ATS (which has a no. of serious flaws).

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          Hey bd2, I’m not really sure the best words to describe it but GM needs to stop making cars that people look at and say, “wow, this bit is awesome but wtf on God’s green earth did they do right next to it???”

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          I’m a little bit concerned about going too far which space efficiency in large luxo cars. At some point of growing the inside to catch up with the outside, the feeling of solidity starts taking a hit.

          It may well be for completely different reasons, but the difference in vault/special/solid feel between an A6/A7 and the Short wheelbase A8 is staggering.

          Interior room is basically the same, but driving it them back to back, the A8 is a European medieval castle with 3 foot walls, while the A6/7 is closer to the contemporary Japanese version, made of paper. Just slightly exaggerated, of course….. :)

    • 0 avatar
      PenguinBoy

      In what way is the current GM LT V8 not “premium”? It seems to me that V8 engines are one thing that GM (and Detroit in general) does very well.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Oh god no…the last time gm tried a “proper” luxo v8 we were stuck with 20 years of northstar hell. They even derived a v6 off that abomination for Oldsmobile called the shortstar. One of the greatest sins at Cadillac and gm in general is sticking with duds far too long. The new Lt is world class and this car deserves nothing less

    • 0 avatar

      I knew a guy who bought a DTS (new, of course). He proudly boasted how it had “an engine from Corvette”. Indeed he was smart enought to verify he actually bought a Northstar-equipped version. I suspect that for a certain kind of Caddy buyer the “refinement” might be overrated, and the car could carry enough sound deafening purely thanks to its large size.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    I’d love to see the business case that GM approved for this. I’m sorry fanbois, but this looks like a lot of wasted resources for very little reward.

    When Caddy’s top execs get done high-fiving each other, I hope they concentrate on making the higher-volume cars — CTS, ATS, SRX, etc. — top of class competitive.

    A halo model only begins to make sense when the basic lineup is attractive in and of itself. The basics are already there, but we know pricing, engine, roominess are problems that need fixing.

    Customers need more reason to consider Cadillac NOW, not dream about something they can’t/won’t buy in 2016. If that isn’t the new guy’s top priority, he’s just another name filling in the slot with grandiose talk.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The CTS is class competitive and is the 3rd best selling sedan in its class with the 3rd highest ATP.

      Cadillac needs to move up the next gen ATS since its biggest issue (interior room) would not be fixed by an MCE (and I suspect that is what they are planning since the current Malibu is slated for a shorter life cycle with its replacement getting increased interior space).

      But where Cadillac is lagging seriously behind is with CUVs with only the aging SRX to offer customers.

      Cadillac needs 2, if not 3 more CUVs (as well as a new SRX) ASAP.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        As long as they don’t make one based on the Trax/Encore.

        I’m not saying attractive CUVs that size can’t be made, but the Trax and Encore just aren’t and I imagine a Cadillac one would for no better.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        The biggest drawback in the ATS/CTS is space efficiency and CUE. The former is a detriment. The latter a deal killer.

        • 0 avatar
          bomberpete

          @Acd: To me, Cadillac’s present situation requires selling tons of everyday ATS and CTS cars.

          That task gets harder every day as those vehicles will only get older, staler and less competitive without continuous improvement/refinement.

          This problem — continuing to attract $40-$60K buyers — needs fixing right away. I’d rather see the resources devoted to better marketing of Cadillac’s current Very Good but not Best Of Class products. That’s what pays the bills and justifies Cadillac’s existence. Otherwise, they’ll die or end up as a China-only proposition.

          A flagship or halo is a helluva risk for a company like GM. Outside of Corvette, they have no recent track record for producing Best of Class or sticking with a strategy over the long haul. As Dirty Harry said, “a man’s got to know his limitations.”

          Finally, I think the democratization of luxury has hit brands like Lincoln, Acura, and Volvo hard and is going to do the same to Cadillac and the Germans. Unless the design and features are really standalone, more buyers realize that the tech and comfort they want is available in vehicles costing 40% less and with fewer maintenance hassles. Watch sales of the CLA, A3, cheaper BMWs and others in two or three years to see if I’m wrong or right.

          The product planning and marketing geniuses at Cadillac must figure out a strategy and on-the-ground tactics to deal with all that. Then they should show consistent success. Then, and only then is when a flagship makes business sense.

    • 0 avatar
      Acd

      A luxury car maker needs to build a flagship car that competes with the best of the best otherwise if for no other reason than to justify the prices of their lesser models. Years of building S-Class sedans and selling them at high prices is what allows Mercedes to sell every sh*&box CLA they can build. In the long term Cadillac can’t afford not to build this car if they want to remain a luxury car maker.

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        I think the Corvette proves that GM engineering can do anything it sets its mind to. BUT, and this is a big one: do you really think GM marketing has the know-how to attract S-class buyers, or that Cadillac dealers can speak to them? I don’t. The brand needs a lot of fixing first. For now that seems to mean “the deal.”

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        I’d say it’s the other way around. Building and selling spitbox CLA’s stuffs the coffers with development dollars for the S-classes which make those CLA’s desirable.

    • 0 avatar
      Varezhka

      Agree on all points. There are plenty of other areas where GM could’ve spent their resource more wisely. This just seem to like an ego boost exercise for GM execs.

      I would think that they should be looking at improving their current lineup first before considering a pretty flagship. That budget could’ve just as easily been applied to something more mundane but more meaningful like, say, increasing QC in the factory, improving engine refinement, or simply lowering MSRP of the cars… and plenty of other options.

      There are values to be had from a halo model, but that’s all GM seem to do. A string of costly low volume ego cars and then extreme penny pinching for their bread and butter.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      By 2016, or some time thereafter, there will be three kinds of people in the world; those who buy LaFerraris to drive in freeway lanes reserved for cars pretending to have F1 hybrid tech. Those who sit logjammed in traffic in used econoboxes while getting harassed for polluting too much. And those who take the bus. At least that’s the goal of current policy makers.

      If you’re a luxo brand, you have to sell to the only one left with money. And he’s not shopping for a CTS.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    Utilize the new platform for a Buick RWD sedan and bring back the Wildcat!
    Price it in the mid-$30,000 range and the market will respond favorably.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      GM sells a RWD Buick in China as the Park Avenue that is basically a rebadged Holden Caprice, but fully loaded. It probably can’t be imported into the US economically given that the Chevy SS (rebadged Holden Commodore) is selling for $50K+, but GM could always sell a variant of the Camaro as a Wildcat.

      I think that a restyled Camaro Wildcat could fit in the Buick lineup well. But this large halo car needs to be a Cadillac only model, otherwise what is the point of Cadillac?

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      It would only make sense to have this platform trickle down to Buick. I recall a gm executive mentioning a model s a7 panamera competitive flagship for Buick. Let’s hope they do it, they desperately need to make the brand relevent.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    Is anyone else bothered that Cadillac can’t master $35-$60K sedans and dependent on the Escalade, yet they want to bring out a flagship that’ll probably come out at somewhere between $80K and $100K?

    On paper, this sounds like the Cadillac that should have and could have been built in the late Eighties/early Nineties until Lexus beat them to it. They’ve lost a lot of ground in 25 years, though.

    Unless this thing will put the Lexus LS and Merc S-class to shame, GM shouldn’t be talking big about it.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Seems to me that Cadillac has pretty much mastered the steering/ride/handling components for $50-60k sedans with the CTS.

      And Cadillac sells a lot more $50-60 sedans with the CTS and XTS than does Lexus, Audi or Infiniti.

      Anyhow, the upcoming flagship sedan for Cadillac is going to be toned down and not look so much like the Elmiraj – but while a disappointment, it’s not like the rest of the segment has sleek designs (tending to be on the conservative side).

      Something with more of the Elmiraj styling will likely be saved for a “4-door coupe” based on the Omega platform.

      • 0 avatar
        bryanska

        I am amazed they do so, with so many glaring faults in the ATS and CTS passenger space. I’m a huge Cadillac fanboy (I’ve owned two, Dad’s owned four) but I can’t forgive the tiny ATS interior and the tiny CTS back seat.

        But hey; if they sell, I’m all happy. Satisfying “the German discussion” means I get my XTS V-sport.

        • 0 avatar

          See, people differ. I cannot figure why anyone gives a flip about rear seat at all. It’s the place where you banish co-workers during launch carpooling, at best. At all other times, it’s for mother-in-law or children. As long as they can be strapped in there somehow, it’s all good. Most of the time the car is going to have just 1 occupant.

          Rear seat of my car is a bench.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Allante!

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    I’ll betcha Ronnie, Marcelo or one of the Euro contributors has the breadth of knowledge to write an article titled something like:

    “Great Halo Cars That Didn’t Help A Bit”

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    http://cdn.iofferphoto.com/img/item/157/462/871/RySHRfdnoEQo6L4.jpg

    De Nysschen says Cadillac will sell 24,000 of these at $80,000 per copy, and BMW, Mercedes & Lexus better fear the smell of what he’s got cookin’.

    De Nysschen said “Cadillac isn’t going to lower their prices or load up on incentives as in the past” just because they’ve got ballooning inventory (140 days and growing for ATS & CTS).

    People will learn that Cadillacs are worth just as much as zeeee German competition, eventually.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      Or is it that the German competition are worth just as much as Cadillacs?

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Could be.

        Either way, many consumers are getting the Big Enema, but that’s what makes a market.

        The older I get, the more I understand better & appreciate more Irv Gordon’s 3 million mile Volvo P1800 with each and every passing day – or that vehicle, its durability, elegance, etc., in general.

        http://volvo1800pictures.com/0_car_photos/S/1966/noc/3257/Volvo_1800S_66_noc_3257_10.jpg

        http://volvo1800pictures.com/0_car_photos/ES/1973/46/Volvo_1800ES_73_46_2351_4.jpg

        http://www.classicargarage.com/common/pictures/mozes/bedrijf/p1800-04/final/supersize/p1800es-int.JPG

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      @dw

      Where do I put my deposit down for the model shown?

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Seriously, look at that:

        http://volvo1800pictures.com/0_car_photos/S/1966/noc/3257/Volvo_1800S_66_noc_3257_10.jpg

        Whoever designed that deserves the Nobel Prize Forever for design.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          Just needs dual exhaust to be perfect.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Volvo used to build gorgeous cars, check out this 164:

          https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3096/3238204211_cf9922ba43.jpg

          EDIT: Above is the one of a kind 162, based on the 164 and on display at the Volvo museum in Gothenburg.

          Here is the 164:

          http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/89/Volvo_164.jpg

          P1800 takes the cake but I like the honest chromed face and relatively smooth lines of the 164.

          Speaking of P1800s here is one for sale in Hemmings, just needs a little -er alot of- TLC. $7K.

          http://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/dealer/volvo/p1800/1633794.html

          Then there’s the 600hp concept car:

          http://iliketowastemytime.com/2012/05/12/volvo-p1800-concept-car

          Attn Cadillac: Your sucky styling has finally played out twelve years on, take a gander at the pics we posted and get inspired. Thank You.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I was never remotely interested in Volvo until the Irv Gordon 3 million mile P1800 story made the rounds, and now find myself salivating over the exterior and interior designs of their circa-late 60s & early 70s cars.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’ve been around them for years both professionally and personally, but I never cared for them at all until I bought my 240.

            Regarding 60s and 70s designs in general, I have always had a soft spot for the big Lincolns, some Cadillacs, Mercedes, and of course the stunning Jaguar E-type.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Gee, the ELR costs $75-80k (now much less). It would take 20 years to sell 24000 copies at its current rate.

      Its latest movement is directly tied to the recent incentives.

      This $80k mystery machine seems like a moon shot.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Can someone describe the difference between ‘flagship’ and ‘halo’ vehicle?

    We use the terms a lot around here, but I’ve just realized that I’m not sure I know the difference, if there is one.

    I thought the ELR was considered a halo car, but I’m not sure it was intended to be a flagship. Can the opposite be said for this mystery car?

    • 0 avatar

      I think the difference is a halo is not necessarily intended to be sold in high numbers. It can be a loss leading exercise if it shows off the brand’s qualities and even brings people in, its job is done.

      A flagship is just the biggest (usually), most expensive of a makers’ wares. Sometimes I’ve seen flagship referred to as the top of the line of a given model in a lineup and not even for the whole lineup.

      Could be wrong of course though.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Honda Legend was their flagship car, NSX was the halo car.

    • 0 avatar

      Pretty much the dualism with ELR, yes.

      If you look at Lexus, for example, their equivalent of Escalade is a halo, while their flagship is LS, which is a real car. If they did not have that, a rebadged LandCruise would’ve been a flagship, just like Escalade is now, and that would be very sad.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Halo = something unique, special, interesting, buzz-worthy. It is supposed to cause people to come into the dealership to see it. Many sports cars, exotics, & the latest-new-thing are halo cars. The term comes from the fact that people come to see it, but sales of other cars go up as a result of their visit (halo effect).

      Flagship = the singular embodiment of what your brand stands for, typically the most advanced, most expensive, best-of-everything you can do. It is the pinnacle of ‘aspirational’ and the source of trickle-down within the product line.

      A car can stop being a halo when its newness wears off, e.g., once the Leaf or new Corvette become sufficiently ‘common’ people won’t visit the dealership to see them. A flag ship should always stay a flagship. A car can be both–if Tesla had any other products, the Model S certainly would have been both, and the best version of the 911 would be, too. The S Class might be both as well. The LS is a flagship, but I don’t consider it a halo. The ELR is neither because it isn’t interesting enough to draw people in, nor is it a good example of what Cadillac stands for / is capable of doing.

  • avatar
    redman

    Lot’s of rational/thoughtful/intelligent comments made here.
    In contrast, my fervent hope for the future powerplant is this:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WtPNUVaIBVs
    (With some large resonators added of course.)
    They have done it before.
    Cheers!
    -E

  • avatar

    great cars + lousy marketing = less share.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    What a waste of time, money and resources.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Way to go GM! I love the Germans, I own an Audi, but sometimes one has to root for the home team.

    What Cadillac needs to do is market this like the Escalade. The Escalade is so successful because it appeals to all demographics. Rappers/athletes love them, retirees love them, yuppies love them, families love them, heck even the CIA loves them.

    Put it in rap videos and lyrics, golf magazines, sports illustrated.

    The Escalade is the essence of America in a car. No reason it can’t have a stablemate.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      It’s odd. I’ve thought about leasing a CTS coupe recently, but the idea of even going in for a test drive made me feel like the sales people wouldn’t take me seriously. Because I’m young, don’t wear a suit to work, and currently drive an old econobox (I have three motorcycles that act as emotional counterweights).

      However, somehow I feel like it would be different if it was the Escalade I showed up inquiring after. There’s probably a lot more unconventional customers coming around to look at those, and they’d likely assume I inherited some money or sold my iPhone app to google or something.

      Regardless, if I ever actually own a Cadillac it’ll probably come down to getting a great deal on a massively-depreciated V-model variant on craigslist in a few years.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I can’t remember is this a coupe or suicide door deal?
    I sure hope they do this right and don’t half— it in the name of fuel efficiency. Decent windshield angles so its not a foot in front of your face, decent visibility (read go back 20+ years) a new engine setup, keep the 6.2 but dual turbo or supercharge it.

    And most important presence, for all that is good, if this car doesn’t have presence it’s a failure.
    Most new cars turn heads, but that wears off very quickly, a vehicle with presence turns heads every time no matter how old it is.
    Don’t lift the center of gravity but keep the trim around the bottom high off the ground, Don’t tuck anything, kills the presence.
    Look at the maxima for how Not to make presence, you have a car that actually has hips its so wide, but none of that benefits the interior.
    Heavy doors, as well.

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    It needs an 8 litre, 16 cylinder engine and an 8 foot long hood to hide it under.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      This right here.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        How about a 12.4 V16 made out of two corvette engines slapped together?

        I don’t see what is stopping GM from going Aston Martin and making a V12 out of 3.6L.

        CAFE can go F**k itself.

        • 0 avatar

          Who’d buy that? Avoiding the question of need or want, who’d buy that?

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            Only one way to go with a drivetrain. The Porsche 918 is a V8 combined with electric motors and that’s where Cadillac has to go. A Corvette engine with electric motors for a total of at least 800 hp. Silent instant torque with a Corvette engine that can join the party when needed.

            BMW has the i8 and VW the 918, so they could make the move to bring that architecture to their luxury vehicles. I think that’s exactly what they’ll do.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            The same sort who buy blacked-out Bentleys, Range Rovers on 24″ rims, and pink Rolls Royce Ghosts.

          • 0 avatar

            And again, how many do that? Painting a car an exotic color or sticking in obviously unfit wheels is one thing, engineering an engine, not only to work, but to pass all necessary (and I say that sincerely, economic, technical, and regulatory wise) is another altogether.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Standard of the world people. Go big or go home. 16 liters, 32 cylinders or bust, I say!

            Because there is no way possible to value a vehicle other than cylinder count or engine displacement. If a luxury buyer can’t roll some coal and say ‘stick it’ to the eco-weeny Republicans who created CAFE and the EPA, then what’s the purpose of a Cadillac?

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Cadillac needs to built a very large, very heavy/solid, very reliable version of a Rolls Royce that has a full air ride suspension, impeccably trimmed inside and out, with brushed stainless steel knobs, switches and dials, analogue gauges, and simplicity of operation throughout the cabin, zero cost concierge service for routine maintenance or warranty work (albeit rarely needed), with 400+ horsepower, enough head and legroom front and back for the entire Harlem Globetrotters, that drives like you’re in a bank vault library on a cloud, with a 100,000 mile/ten year bumper to bumper warranty – and then price it well beneath a Mercedes S Class, ensuring they’ll lose a lot of money on each of the 10,000 they sell (all pre-ordered) each year.

      This is how conquest is successfully undertaken in modern times against zeee German Executive Saloons.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do think the front end of this vehicle is very distasteful, but that is a personal opinion.

    What kills the front end is the Mazda BT50 size and shaped grille. I’d almost bet it will fit straight into my pickup. My BT50 I had to cover the front end with a large bull bar and driving lights.

    BT50 with the bull bar driving lights, maybe the Caddy could adopt this to make it more aesthetically pleasing.

    http://www.themotorreport.com.au/content/image/0/2/02_2012_mazda_bt_50_2011_australian_international_motor_show_03-4e24e73744c58.jpg

    BT50 without the makeup. I could almost swap the grilles.

    http://www.themotorreport.com.au/content/image/2/0/2012_mazda_bt_50_cab_chassis_diesel_manual_xt_hi_rider_review_02_1-1016-400×200.jpg

    The rest of the vehicle does look rather nice. It’s also good to see Caddy moving in the direction of making Euro/Asian competitive vehicles and not use the philosophy that anything with a Caddy badge will sell.

    The poorest example is the Silverado Escalade’s.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    The phonetic strangeness of Hamtramck led me to Wiki for its ethnic origin. Thought it may be Dutch but its French-Canadian.

    Reading further about the town showed it to be a quintessence of rustbelt rot compounded by an influx of third-worlders, heavily muslim. What manner of local workforce must GM have there?

    I guess its emblematic that GM’s flagship/halo car/S-class fighter should have to be built in such a place. Maybe things like this help explain the refusal of premium buyers throughout the world to take Cadillac seriously in spite of some arguably competitive vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Those that work at Poletown (local name for Detroit-Hamtramck Assembly) don’t live in Hamtramck. I would bet that most live in suburbs or Detroit itself. GM and the city of Detroit got rid of any skilled labor that existed in Hamtramck when they bulldozed a Polish neighborhood to build Detroit-Hamtramck assembly. The Detroit neighborhoods that border Poletown are $hit. My grandfather sold his bar that is less than ten blocks away after he was shot. Someone killed his Doberman the month before while robbing the place, so he figured it was time to sell.

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        SOP for the industrial North.

        I bet those who commute from burbs would only give you an uncomprehending look if at the end of a shift you quipped “straight home, now!”.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @petezeiss,
      Your comment is lacking.

      WTF are you leading too?

      Caddy’s aren’t a global product because Caddy’s have never been perceived as a quality product outside of the US.

      It has nothing to do with racial demographics.

      So far most all of your contribution has little to do with vehicles. You have come to TTAC and furnished us with your worthless and immature dialogue.

      Why don’t you talk cars? I do feel you should be assessed by the Editor in Chief for the value of your contributions to TTAC.

      What a schmuck you are.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I own a Hamtramck built Impala . The build quality ,fit ,and finish, is excellent . The rest of your your racist comment, doesn’t deserve a reply.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Hating a culture is not hating a race. Muslims and Jews are the same Semitic “race” and I sure as hell respect Jews.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I will be renting a new model Impala from the 25th of September through the 29th.

      They had better have one reserved when I get there (LAX) because I specifically chose that car for review purposes (if not, they will probably try to bump me into a Volvo S60 or Audi A4, which I do not want – but I would willingly take a new E Class in lieu thereof).

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Get the S60, I’d love to hear what you think of it. I certainly don’t think much of them.

        • 0 avatar
          hachee

          That’s interesting. While I really didn’t like the original S60 at all, I’ve rented a few of the current generation, and I’ve actually really liked them. I’ve driven them around the L.A. area, and liked them better than current 4 cyl BMW 328s. Great seats too.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @mikey
      We don’t normally see eye to eye, but I fully support you on this one.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @BAFO…So glad we have found some common ground.

        I think it might be best to take “28 Cars” advice on this one.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @mikey,
          If you google Economic Liberal, that’s what I am.

          I do believe in a liveable minimum wage, public education and health.

          But, if you read the rest you can see why I don’t support the ‘stuff’ I talk about concerning international vehicle trade,etc.

          Believe it or not we do have many common goals for a successful society.

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    I’ve got it. Massive inline 8 cylinder engine, 8 liters, turning a generator at 3000 rpm max with an electric motor for each wheel a la diesel electric freight train.

  • avatar
    Joss

    What’s the big thing these days with LED handle bar lighting? Cadillac throwing buckets into a smaller production run. They have whiffed the Jag raj ahead and want to catch the rear bumper. Behind Lincoln’s cross looms – not burning brightly, more of an out-of-jurisdiction trooper. Expensive flagship lets hope it’s not the Mary Rose.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    Two halo vehicles:
    1: Oldsmobile Aurora 1995-1999, showing the future styling of an entire division and a vehicle for which I took several Mercedes S-Classes in trade.
    2: GMC Motorhome 1973-1978, a whole different take on in-house design, production and sales and still the best classic motorhome in the USA! See http://www.gmccoop.com! My 1976 runs just like a Toronado since the chassis is based on the E-body and has the Rocket 455 V8.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Ah Olds Aurora, the wrong thing at the right time. If only Olds had brought out Antares (later Intrigue) first or had brought out a “baby” Aurora as an Eighty Eight replacement at the same time as the G-body V8 there still might be an Oldsmobile. Maybe.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Olds Aurora….. it had one hell of a V8 engine in it! Then again, my preference for Oldsmobile engines over several decades is well known.

        For a while there, Olds’ V8 found an application in racing circles, up until Olds died.

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    If the production car stays close to the prototype, it will sell well here in the US market. It will continues to lag well behind MB, BMW, Audi and Lexus everywhere else in the world.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      If it’s only built in LHD, like all Cadillac models of late, it will be a poor seller (even relative to other poor sellers) in RHD markets. They could sell a reasonable number of Caddy flagships in Japan, UK, etc., but not without RHD.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      If they really think there’s a market for this outside of China and North America, I want to smoke what they’re smoking.

  • avatar
    CGHill

    Note that de Nysschen never recommended anything like this when he was running (or appeared to be running) Infiniti, which is in similar straits, brand-image-wise.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Well, we don’t know what got shot down in private at Infiniti. We also don’t know that de Nysschen came up with this idea. He just got there, so the idea, the engineering, and decision to build was likely in the works already. NOBODY just takes over a GM division and makes production decisions.

  • avatar
    turboprius

    The Elmiraj is a beautiful car. How Cadillac executes the production version is to be seen.

    I like the idea of taking concepts and making the production models look exactly like them. I believe it worked beautifully for the i8; I once said BMW was boring except for the i and M models, and the i8 is stunning. Yeah Cadillac, call it the LTS, but the Elmiraj will live on! If the production version just looks like a 210 inch long CTS (which it’s seeming to look like so far), I’ll call it the LTS.

  • avatar
    _David_

    I can’t wait until 2015. I would love to see this Cadillac car in flesh and blood. It’s amazing. Once I rode on one. It was my friend’s car. Then just last year, I availed the services of http://presidentialluxurylimo.com/ and realized that their horsepower are pretty much alike.

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