By on August 28, 2014

It’s been a while since TTAC crackled and buzzed with the latest Toyota news all the time — but this morning, we’re changing that!

Toyota is producing the 1990s-era Series 70 Land Cruiser in two body styles as a year-long, Japanese-market love letter to its most ardent fans. The pricing is bargain basement — about thirty-four grand for either style — and the drivetrain pairs a 228-horse four-liter V6 with a five-speed manual transmission and part-time 4WD. Locking diffs are optional, as is a winch.

What a lovely, desirable, heirloom-quality vehicle. Can’t get it here, though — “here” being “anywhere but Japan”, to misquote Mona Simpson. And the original Series 70 Cruisers can still be found in the United States, although condition may vary (you can buy them as commercial vehicles in Australia as well). This rebuilding thing is brilliant, though. Now if only they’d do the final Cressida, the first LS400, the ’94 Supra Twin Turbo, the 2000GT…

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41 Comments on “Toyota Re-Pops The Series 70 Land Cruiser!...”


  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    Adequate greenhouse: check. Nice thin pillars: check. No way it would pass modern rollover NTSB regulations: check. Sigh.

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      This!
      It just kills me to see that beautiful yellow “van” and know we’ll never get it.

      • 0 avatar
        frozenman

        This is the first time a TTAC article has made me cry, not having access to that awesome blue truck is soul crushing, all price comparisons to full size trucks be damned! :(

    • 0 avatar
      grinchsmate

      I have driven the cab chassis with a toyota branded internal roll bar behind the seats. I’m pretty sure it was ex mine so I assume the bar was dealer installed. I didn’t see how it was bolted on but it was wrapped in the same canvas as the seats and looked pretty professional.

      I had a mate who rolled his cruiser without a roll bar. The cab did crush a bit but there is so much space to start with he wasn’t hurt.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      It may not have to, depending on how it’s sold.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      You’re correct, which is why the many organizations that use these things order them with roll bars or have them installed. It’s especially important to install them on the pickups while it’s not as critical on the troopie body as the wagon body. I’ve had several in my fleet (one without a bar or cage) that rolled everyone walked away.

      At least the pillars aren’t as weak as the Defender series. Those, you may as well be talking about pillars made from aluminium foil.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Is that the same four-liter V6 that’s in the FJ Cruiser? I wonder why they aren’t using the FJ’s 6 speed manual.

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      Logistics. Standardization of fleet operations between, across and throughout the many organizations that have standardized on the 70 series the world over for the past several decades. When the ICRC team operating in my area in remote areas of the Congolese jungle burns out their clutch plates, I can send a motorcycle team out there with a couple spare plates from my vehicle base without thinking too hard about it.

  • avatar
    zbnutcase

    I would like to add the first-gen (69-72) Corona Mark II 2dr Hardtop to the re-pop wish list….sigh. But as far as the LC goes, I would gladly take the pick-up version, even in wrong hand drive.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    It’s fun to dream about what other models could be re-popped and sold as new if it weren’t for regulation strangulation. We know Nissan was looking at reusing the design of the old Hardbody for a lost cost truck which would satisfy our militant small truck lovers, but what else could we ask for? Perhaps a brand new Fox Body Mustang LX 5.0 with a factory Coyote motor? Yes, please. And for those who really want to go fast, Ford and GM could even collaborate to offer a factory version with an LS engine already installed.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Doesn’t Mercedes offer a factory-refurb program for classic cars? I’m not sure if it’s an option in North America, but I believe they do.

    I think someone out these also does full-wiring-harness replacements for older Jags, since you can’t get Lucas-brand wiring harness smoke anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      There’s tons of great options out there for new old cars now. You can build a brand new 1965 Mustang, 1969 Camaro, 1932 Ford etc. from the ground up out of a catalog. The difference of course being that they didn’t roll down an OEM assembly line. What a great time to be an enthusiast.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      …and there are companies who recondition Land Cruisers, one who advertised during Pebble Beach week, and another from about eight years ago in Van Nuys,CA who specialized in restoring 1960’s-early 1970’s LC’s(http://tlc4x4.com/company.htm).

      And, a company called British Wiring(in a Chicago suburb last time I checked) makes really fine complete harnesses for British cars(based on the former company AutoSpark in the UK).

  • avatar
    Signal11

    It’s not true that you can’t still get a brand new 70 series LandCruiser except in Japan or Australia.

    Toyota still makes LHD and RHD versions of 78 and 79 model Land Cruisers for direct sales to NGO and intergovernmental organizations. Generally speaking, most large fleet operators have them shipped to their regional logistics bases for final outfitting before they’re shipped out to their eventual destinations, but in emergencies, Toyota will assist in airlifting vehicles directly from the factory out to your destination country.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      That explains why the re-pop is even possible, then; to some degree they never stopped making them.

      • 0 avatar
        Signal11

        Yep. I don’t know what volume they were doing but there are still a lot of brand new 70 series running around Africa and Toyota of Kenya will sell you a 70 series right off the show room floor as a personally owned vehicle.

        It’s been a few years since I moved into academia, but as late as the Haiti earthquake, the most recent volumes of the MSF Logistique supply catalog had an item number and handy little worksheet in the back to work out how much it’d cost to have Toyota drop ship you a 78 or 79. Never did it myself but IIRC, it generally worked out to about the high 30s.

        • 0 avatar
          ccode81

          below link’s photo is what Toyota claims as average monthly production of 70 series. astonishing growth year by year.

          http://car.watch.impress.co.jp/img/car/docs/663/600/html/009.jpg.html

    • 0 avatar
      ccode81

      Toyota Gibraltar’s website is one interesting place to kill time on net surfing.

      • 0 avatar
        grandestmarquis

        Good call!

        Apparently you can get a bare bones, 5-Speed manual/4.4L V8 Land Cruiser in Gibraltar…(commence drooling)

        http://toyota-gib.com/English/VariantDetails.aspx?ID=2008445&NTD=40

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Toyota should fill these with bricks, import them as commercial trucks, and leave it to the owners’ discretion what to do with the bricks.

  • avatar
    WaftableTorque

    Perhaps this is the next stage of luxury car marketing: take a heritage product whose R & D was amortized decades ago, do some basic safety upgrades to bring it up to code, and sell the car riding the coat tails of it’s reputation. If the Gelandewagen can do it, why not the Land Cruiser?

    It’s not like other luxury good makers don’t do the same thing. In fact, I’d argue there are industries out there (mechanical watches, leather goods, oilskin coats, dress shoes, etc.) that sell goods that are about the same as they were 50 years ago.

    Alas, I can’t see the trend working outside the image-is-everything SUV/pickup truck/muscle car markets. Sometimes you really want innovation and substance.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      I’ve observed several Land Rover Defenders running around my US city. Mostly RHD, but looking brand new and on US plates. Confused, I finally asked a guy getting out of one in a parking lot what the deal was. He explained that his was an ’85 chassis, legally imported and then restored/upgraded in the US, sparring no expense.

      All that trouble because short-sided health and safety nannying and ludicrous 25-year import bans.

      • 0 avatar
        tekdemon

        You could probably do something similar with this-you just have to import a 25 year old Land Cruiser 70 series and then proceed to repair it piece by piece with parts off one of these rerelease vehicles until it’s more new than old. I’m sure there would be legitimate reasons to replace a lot of the components so you could get an almost new 70 series after you’re all done.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “This rebuilding thing is brilliant”

    Genius. Several of us of suggested this for several OEMs and I salute the folks of Toyota for making it happen.

    “Now if only they’d do the final Cressida, the first LS400, the ’94 Supra Twin Turbo, the 2000GT…”

    Toyota would win the internet AND the interwebz.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      And they could create “new” brands for these re-do cars.

      Toyota Classic and Lexus Heritage (optional: Collection)

      With the secondary words in script to the lower-right side of the logos, or with the model badging, so you know what you’re seeing.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    So much want. I hop on Toyota’s South Africa site every so often and look at the forbidden fruit 70 series they have been continuously making for that market.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    In the Outback where I live these would be one of the most popular vehicles around.

    I do like these 70 odd series Landcrusiers, even though I’m not really a Toyota fan. For off road toughness these are ever reliable and strong. One of the toughest 4x4s on the planet.

    We don’t get the gas V6, we only have a diesel V8.

    They do cost some money, but they are so common.

    http://www.toyota.com.au/landcruiser-70-series/specifications/cab-chassis-workmate

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Just like Pearl Harbor, Japan has awoken a sleeping giant in the United States. I call upon Chrysler to bring back the Grand Wagoneer with a 5.7L Hemi.

  • avatar
    MR2turbo4evr

    If we could get these in Canada, even if Toyota had to inflate the price a little, I’d be on the phone with the dealer right now to order one. Words can’t express how badly I want one of those.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      My (Canadian) brother-in-law told me that there is a mechanism in place that allows you to import cars into Canada, even if they are not normally sold there.

      Over the years he has been married to my sister, he has imported a variety of cars from the Kent-Desmoines (Seattle) area to Vancouver, BC, without any problems, for his side of the family.

      Biggest reason, cars cost a lot less in the US than they do in Canada. Caveat here is that none of the cars he imported was brand new, but usually 1-3 years old, with Washington State tags on them.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @highdesertcat,
        Similar to what you can do in Australia with US Pickups. You can import brand new Pickups, but something that is a year older is a lot cheaper.They are not actually sold here, but limited (diesel) versions can be imported

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Just in time for the war with ISIS. Replace that new age video soundtrack with some Arabic pop music or death metal, and you’re good to go.

    I’ve been noticing in various pictures online that the ISIS guys were driving Toyotas, but the Kurds were driving Nissans. This doesn’t bode well for our side, now does it?

  • avatar
    greasemonkey235097

    The 70 Series Land Cruiser has never seized production, in colombia has been sold since 1984, today still offered as a short wheel base 2 door, long wheel base 4 door wagon, long wheel base 2 door trooper carrier, and a 2 door cab and chassis.

    http://ww0.autoamerica.com.co/toyota/land-cruiser/galeria/

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