By on July 3, 2014

Gulfstream-G-650

Don’t you just hate it when you ask people to put on a sweater in the winter, metaphorically speaking, and then your tax on tank tops fails to bring in the cash harvest?

Just Imagine How Good It Would Be Without Those Ecoboost Fords: The averaged fuel economy of all new light vehicles sold in June slipped a bit, according to Wards. The 25.3mpg figure was still better than June of last year and nearly 21% better than June of 2007. The highest-rated automaker was Mitsubishi with a fleet average of 30.2mpg, the only automaker to exceed the 30mpg mark. The average for all cars was 29.4mpg, the average for all trucks was 21.0mpg.

In Completely Unrelated News To What You Just Read The Federal Highway Fund is going to be in the red as early as August of this year, a consequence of fleet fuel economy that has significantly increased and more drivers staying home in the recession that dare not have its name spoken by the media. Ideas floated by politicians and their lapdogs in the media include: raising the gas tax, switching to per-mile user fees, doubling the tariff on tea.

From Britain To Infiniti: The new Infiniti Q30 compact car and the QX30 CUV will be built using Nissan facilities in Sunderland, UK. They’ll share platforms with the B-Class Mercedes-Benz and will almost certainly never appear in the United States, primarily because dealers here continue to remember the sales nightmare that was the Infiniti G20.

It’ll Be Like Spending Six Months With Katy Perry Then Marrying One Of Those “Dove Real Beauty” Women: Morons Buyers who are waitlisted on the new “Porsche” Macan are being offered a way to pass the time: short-term leases of a Boxster or Cayman. On the face of it, this is easily the most stupid idea Porsche’s ever had, and given that the company spent two years selling a 911 with no head gaskets that’s saying something. But a few minutes’ worth of Ketel One consumption thought on the issue is enough to change my mind. Some percentage of the Macandroids might actually enjoy driving a sports car enough to cancel their order for the Q5-via-Leipzig, which reduces the waiting list and modestly bumps sales of Porsche’s best mass-market vehicles a bit. It will also reduce the confusion of their neighbors, who would be highly surprised to see something that looks like a CR-V with thyroid disorder appear after hearing boasting about having a “Porsche on waitlist”.

What Do You Want To Bet Birdman’s Contract Says The Same Thing: Ford’s new boss, Mark Fields, will likely be cashing out over and above the $10.2 million in total compensation he received last year. His base salary will increase nine percent, a modest increase that could be said to parallel the complete and utter wage stagnation seen by the employed middle class since 2008. Best of all, however, “Fields would be required to use a private plane when traveling on company business for safety and efficiency, the company said.” Fly like a G6!

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53 Comments on “While You Were Sleeping: July 3, 2014...”


  • avatar

    “The Federal Highway Fund is going to be in the red as early as August of this year, a consequence of fleet fuel economy that has significantly increased and more drivers staying home in the recession that dare not have its name spoken by the media. ”

    Maybe if we’d focus on AMERICA’S INFRASTRUCTURE instead of Iraq, Afghanistan, Ukraine’s and several dozen other countries…perhaps we wouldn’t have a problem building roads and bridges?

    LET ME BE AS DIRECT AS POSSIBLE:

    I don’t give a single damn about ANY of those countries.
    If those people want freedom, let them fight for it.
    I refuse to die for any other country except this one.
    I wish the rest of America was smart enough to vote for leaders who would STOP sending our tax dollars to these scumbags who are just gonna turn on us during the next “regime change” and focus our efforts on making sure our cities, borders and states are flourishing.

    There is no good reason Detroit should be failing and we should be in Iraq.

    When America gets smarter, we’ll stop being in the red.

    IMPEACH THEM ALL.

    • 0 avatar
      FractureCritical

      ah, but you are not thinking like a politician.

      here, let me logic it out for you:

      Infastructure investment is about 90% labor, 10% materials, so that means that every $1 you spend on roads, almost all of it goes to a guy with a shovel. that guy is probably union. Worse, if the roads are that bad, its becuase they’re heavily travelled, so they’re probably in port or coastal states, which are ususally blue states. SPENDING MONEY IN UNION BLUE STATES = BAD IN CONGRESS.

      Now, let’s look at military spending. Military spending, either on R&D, weapons production, or outright war is insanely expensive, but it means a gun and a paycheck in the hands of every man or woman that wants one, and Uncle Sam is willing to train without a master’s degree. So it’s a very popular as an ad hoc ‘jobs program’ in states that would otherwise have high unemployment rates due to poor education systems. Military bases are the same way. you can practically invent a town in Kansas just by putting up a stockade fence and piling some planes behind it. And weapons systems? oh, my.. There’s a reason that a $1 billion dollar bomber has parts made in every_single_state in the union, including Hawaii, Alaska, and Israel. (yes, I went there). It’s to make jobs making war. That kind of money is EASY to get. It’s for national defense! It’s patriotic! It’s saleable back home in the reddest of red redplaces where more guns = good.

      Hey, at the end of the day, I AGREE with you, but I just don’t see infastructure spending hapeening before dropping another trillion or so on blowing up more foriegn lands. There’s more political will behind putting a gun in an 18 year old Oklahoma kid’s hand in Iran than there is fixing a bridge that your 6 year old kid’s school bus rides on everyday in y our hometown.

      have a good 4th of July..

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        I don’t object to spending on infrastructure in theory, I just don’t trust the mouth-breathing retards in our government to do it efficiently or intelligently.

        -Sent from IL, land of corruption and incompetence

        • 0 avatar
          FractureCritical

          and you have no idea how bad it’s gotten.

          Remember that infastructure spending – including DOT staff, is partially derived from the gas tax, which has not been touched on a national level since 1993, and a political poison pill on the state level since the first wooden wheel hit a dirt road.

          That means that your average private industry engineer now earns almost DOUBLE what a state engineer makes. Used to be around parity, once you added in the pensions and other benefits.

          That means that the state DOT offices are largely vacant as so many of them left for greener paychecks on the private side long ago.

          So now you want to spend on infastructure? Let’s give a few BILLION DOLLARS to DOT’s run by a skeleton crew of engineers just trying to hold things toghether with spit, bailing wire, 5 year old pay freezes, and no permitted overtime. I’m sure it’ll all turn out fine.

        • 0 avatar
          CriticalMass

          This is an election year guys. Nobody, blue or red, wants to be seen raising taxes, that’s the rub on the highway bill at this time. And remember, if you’re only able to see one side of an argument due to bias then you are blind in one eye and more easily led by the nose. Keep both eyes open.

        • 0 avatar
          seth1065

          S2K Chris
          Gotta agree 100%
          sent fron NJ where we look to IL for a model on how to screw people.

          • 0 avatar
            RogerB34

            Didn’t realize NJ was that bad.
            In both states it is voters screwing themselves.
            Over many years voters opted for higher property and other taxes and for many years have been mystified why taxes are so high.

        • 0 avatar
          05lgt

          Re: IL, land of corruption and incompetence

          OR is closing on you, if we haven’t taken first yet. CRC (a replacement for a bridge that will not stand for another 20 years no matter what and will fall in any large quake) has something like 200M spend and … nothing but scandal to show for it. That would raise ire, but the whole 500M+ for no website thing has us distracted.

      • 0 avatar

        Darn. You are SO correct.

        I’m off to drive today to NYC-then lower upstate NY. On the way, I will drive a parkway system that still floods when it rains…the pavement is fully three dimensional…and the capacity is a large multiple of the design from the 30’s and early 40’s.

        I will pay over $10 in bridge tolls. Over half my income is taken by various taxes when you add them all in.

        No one is fixing any of my roads, save an occasional patch for the really big wheel eaters, but that is like giving pain meds to a guy dying of infection and no antibiotics.

        I’m not quite so isolationist, but Ike was right !!!!

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          Here in Obama’s homeland, every road is under construction all the time in the summer. Two main arteries to get from A to B? Let’s rip up 20 miles of both at the same time, and then let them sit while we trudge along doing .5 mile at a time on one of them. Crappy road? Let’s resurface it, but not so well that we don’t have to do it again next year. Town A shutting down road X? Town B next door is shutting down road Y. Why would we coordinate??

          Etc. Just retards, giving actual retards a bad name.

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      Big Truck,
      I am sure that Hitler wished you were in charge in the 40’s, it is one big world and we can not just turn a blind eye to it. Now should we be there that is open to debate but it seems your view is eyes closed.

  • avatar
    BrandonHarlow

    I agree with the above. infrastructure is Americas most important issue at hand and Hilary will fix it! lol

    • 0 avatar

      I do not want Hillary or any other democrat in office in 2016.

      SHE HAS NO ACCOMPLISHMENTS – NEITHER DID OBAMA.

      As far as I’m concerned, you should have to have been a Governor for at least 1 full-term BEFORE being allowed to be president.

      My Tax dollars are TOO PRECIOUS to me to see squandered in these WORTHLESS 3-rd world countries. After-all, the new Hellcat is coming and gas prices aren’t going down (thanks to Greener Liberals holding back America’s energy production).

      • 0 avatar

        “My Tax dollars are TOO PRECIOUS to me to see squandered in these WORTHLESS 3-rd world countries”.

        I hope you were against the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, and as vocal in you denouncements of the needless deaths, and TRILLION DOLLARS WASTED, as you are about us progressive liberal Democrats.

        • 0 avatar

          Before Iraq, I marched in NYC in the “no war” protests. I took my toddler and no, there were few (if any) “pot smoking hippies/communists” involved. Most of the folks there were otherwise “normal”, all races, male, female, etc. All ages. I was interviewed by a BBC radio reporter, too.

          The protest was huge. Many, many city blocks.

          I knew “the fix was in” when all of the national news gave it short shrift…one of the largest and most broad based protests in recent history…and local news covered it decently, but the big three mentioned it only in passing and with very deceptive and intentionally minimizing video shots. Fox even covered it “in the studio” with a monitor showing only the “pot smoking hippie/communist” sideshow in a tight angle….000002% of the protesters.

          I want to hear the daily conference call where “what is news” is discussed, and “what we want missed” is also discussed. I’d like to know who is on that call, too.

          • 0 avatar
            darkwing

            It’s a well-known fact that the vast right-wing conspiracy shares office space with NBC.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Oh is that where they moved too?

          • 0 avatar
            guevera

            The biggest name in television news consultants, Frank Magid and Associates, specifically advised its clients (which include at least one of the TV news operations in almost every city in America) to limit, downplay, and ‘marginalize’ coverage of anti-Iraq-war protests.

            The bulletin included some comments about the mood of the country and advised TV news managers that it was a good opportunity to brand their station as patriotic and American, potentially at the expense of the competition.

            When Magid talks, news managers listen. This particular note outraged many of us in the trenches, but, as you may have noticed, most of our bosses felt differently.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’d be curious to know the Frank Magid Agency position on anything political the past four years. Seems as if MSM has been playing a little dumb when it comes to current events.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        You know, I was completely in agreement with you until the “holding back energy production” comment.

        You do know that oil is fungible, and the US—who is a net *exporter* last time I checked—increasing production will just send more oil overseas to the profit of the oil companies, right?

        There’s no incentive to keep prices low, not when global demand more or less stays the same and profit margins can go up.

        • 0 avatar
          chuckrs

          Increased US oil production damages the interests of two of our main enemies – Russia and Saudi Arabia.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Hurts the Saudis more as their supplies are already on life support, which is one of the reasons they are trying to get into the natural gas business. Gazprom is already the world’s number one supplier of natural gas and the Soviets have untapped oil reserves for decades.

        • 0 avatar

          “You do know that oil is fungible, and the US—who is a net *exporter* last time I checked”

          Leave the “energy” and “geology” related viewpoints to me.

          America is NOT a net “exporter”. America has laws keeping us from “exporting”. we are a net PRODUCER – mostly thanks to the booms in energy production via hydrofracking.

          The LIBERALS are keeping us from having the Keystone XL pipeline (and related jobs), for example.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            The Keystone pipeline is dead. The Canadians got tired of waiting and will build an all-Canada pipeline to the west coast, for sales in Asia. That means if the Bakken oil companies want to move their oil to Oklahoma, they’ll have to pay for the Keystone pipeline (minus the cross-border segment) themselves.

            The cross border segment was the only portion that needed presidential approval. The rest is approved and can be built, just no longer with Canadian money. Now we’ll see whether the Bakken drillers are willing to build it themselves, or keep shipping crude in rail cars.

            Yes there are laws prohibiting exports of crude, but not refinery products. We export gasoline to Europe and Asia, along with other oil-based products. That’s actually a bit of an advantage, in that domestic crude is cheaper than the world price of oil, due to a shortage of refineries. That allows them to play off crude producers for the lowest price.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Yeah, we are fked.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Toyota dropped 2%. Maybe they need to get rid of their V6’s.

      ” Ford was one of the most improved automakers from May, rising 1.3%. Increased share of small cars and electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles boosted the automaker to a record high 24.6 mpg (9.5 L/100 km).”

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        They are not in such a desperate position with their brand’s fuel economy as the domestics. Whatever they do, it will be a long and thought out move.

        Funny how gov’t over time literally helped cede the auto market to foreign marques.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Business jets are business tools, they are not toys. They are too expensive for that, especially the $30 million plus G650 pictured. As a former corporate pilot, most jets, especially large cabin like the Gulfstream, Falcons,etc. are used 95% for business.

    Lots of people lost their jobs over the BS over corporate flight during the bankruptcy hearings for totally unnecessary reasons. And we all know that the Big 3 didn’t lose ALL that money over executives using the private jet fleet.

    Besides, at that pay rate, I don’t want big money CEO’s sitting in Newark, JFK, Dulles or any other airline hub to connect to wherever they need to be.

    • 0 avatar

      Corporate Jets allow businessmen to SAVE TIME. I don’t understand why none of them have the balls to explain that when they are being grilled by these IDIOT liberals on TV.

      Furthermore, they CREATE JOBS for the little guy.

      true Story:

      I volunteered to take school kids to JFK International airport each year to show them careers in aviation. There are so many careers available and many of them don’t require you to be very-high-skilled.

      I’m doing my part to make America strong.

      • 0 avatar
        CriticalMass

        +1 G650’s start at $65M and are meant primarily for long range international travel. They are the second fastest thing in the sky and the fastest long-range aircraft in that role. They do indeed save tons of time for those companies that operate them. More importantly in the long run is that the industry that builds those aircraft provides not just increasing levels of technology to the rest of the economy but also thousands of well-paying high tech engineering and production jobs at both the prime manufacturing companies and their hundreds of suppliers. Aerospace is also among the biggest export dollar earners, perhaps the biggest. Knocking an industry like that is like cutting your nose off to spite your face.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          It might also be noted that with a large enough number of people all going to one place, it’s CHEAPER than commercial flight, even on economy class.

          My company does this – you only need 5 or 6 people traveling to make it more cost efficient. But we don’t have G6’s. The biggest one is a Citation V or something.

        • 0 avatar

          “More importantly in the long run is that the industry that builds those aircraft provides not just increasing levels of technology to the rest of the economy but also thousands of well-paying high tech engineering and production jobs at both the prime manufacturing companies and their hundreds of suppliers. ”

          Why is it that people like you and I see the big picture…but the world is filled with envious, haters and spiteful people who do nothing, produce nothing and attack the rich?

          Do they realize that jets and expensive machines produce jobs for the little guy? Do they realize they can get rich if they work harder and smarter?

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Just maybe it’s because they are trained as economists and know that trickle down economics and the Laffer curve were de-bunked 20+ years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            Actually, VoGo, they’re trained as Marxist economists, and follow the dictum that wealth is a mysterious asset of limited quantity. If you don’t have enough of it, somebody else has too much, so it must be redistributed equally.

            The concept that accumulating and spending capital on new ventures and other economic activity can create new wealth through the multiplication or velocity of money, is alien to them.

      • 0 avatar
        guevera

        “Furthermore, they CREATE JOBS for the little guy.”

        Quit drinking the job creator kool-aid.

        Demand for products and services creates jobs. Aggregate demand is below trend because most Americans make less money now than similarly positioned workers did in the 1970s. Most of that missing income has been redistributed to the sort of scumbags who fly private jets. That’s cool for the companies that make the jets, but the economy as a whole would be doing better — and more jobs would be created — if that money stayed with regular working stiffs.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      This. The vast majority of private jets are business time machines. They have to make business sense in order to keep operating. This is why jet sharing services have become so popular. It’s like the proletariat thinks they’re used solely for filming rap videos.

      What were you rated on, gearhead? My old man flys in the right seat of a Citation X at the moment.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        I’m typed on the “Slowtation”, the 500 series. I’m flying a Dash 8 turboprop now for a regional carrier though.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Ah yes. Before the X there was a III, but before that a lowly old II. He’s looking to expand service with an Avanti Evo or King Air 350 at the moment.

          It’s a shame I never caught the flying bug the way my old man did, cars always came first.

          • 0 avatar
            gearhead77

            My Dad is a retired airline mechanic and is a car guy, so to me, the two are linked that way.

            To me, flying is the most interaction between man and machine besides racing. Automation has taken much of the flying out of flying, but you still have to make it work when the automation doesn’t.

          • 0 avatar
            CriticalMass

            I get a vicarious thrill from watching the Citation X on flightaware.com cooking along eastbound in the jetstream doing nearly 700mph ground speed. Four hours flat coast to coast makes a commercial drone like me envious beyond any mere shade of green.

        • 0 avatar
          1967mgb

          Good for you. The Dash-8 seems to be a great airplane. It was featured in a Nat Geo episode titled ” The Congo Bush Pilots” and was flown into a Congolese village called Bukama on a dirt runway; something many naysayers said couldn’t be done. It was the first time in 30 years that the villagers had seen a airplane. And the Congolese flight attendant was gorgeous. http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/exposure/content/photo/photo/248_congo-bush-pilots-4_pec6h7ytenr4mwgxehecgrp6ilncurxrbvj6lwuht2ya6mzmafma_610x389.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          Doesn’t that mean you can avoid JFK, O’Hare, DFW, and LAX and fly into smaller, uncongested airports closer to where you want to go and where people are actually happy to see you? That alone is worth the cost.

          • 0 avatar
            hubcap

            “Doesn’t that mean you can avoid JFK, O’Hare, DFW, and LAX and fly into smaller, uncongested airports closer to where you want to go…”

            It does. Many people don’t realize just how many airports are accessible by corporate aircraft (jets and turboprops).

            Pilatus is in the final stages of the certification process for a corporate jet that will have significant rough field ability (similar to what their PC-12 can do).

            Flying general aviation aircraft to your destination is a totally different world from the commercial carriers.

  • avatar

    Alan Mulally and the anti-example of GM have shown that quality management makes a huge difference in companies.

    Mark Fields had to give up his prized private jet perk when Ford was hurting. With the company now prospering, I think he’s earned it back.

    David

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “It’ll Be Like Spending Six Months With Katy Perry Then Marrying One Of Those “Dove Real Beauty” Women”

    Sigh… (shakes head)

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Rick Peck: Let me get this straight. You want me to let my client of 15 years, one of my best friends, die in the jungle alone, for some money and a G5?

    Les Grossman: Yes.

    Rick Peck: [pause] A G5 airplane?

    Les Grossman: [whispering] Yes… and lots of money… playaaaa!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I can’t read Jack’s G20 story, because my work filters it. As “Sports.”

    Wah oh!

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Why should I trust the feds to do right with the gas tax when the PA of NY and NJ has shown me how increase tolls fix the bridges and roads in metro NY, I pay over $400 a month to EZ pass and the bridges and roads suck.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Well, yet another thread stolen by the fount of all knowledge, BTSR.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    You can’t just post a G650 picture and not give it a NSFW warning.

  • avatar
    3Deuce27

    Sheesh! And to think I almost missed this one. JB you were in rare form for this enjoyable multifaceted diatribe

  • avatar
    guevera

    “the complete and utter wage stagnation seen by the employed middle class since 2008.”

    Actually that would be since 1974, ’76, or ’77 depending on which measures you use.

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