How To Buy A Used Car Part 4: Negotiating

Steven Lang
by Steven Lang
how to buy a used car part 4 negotiating

When it comes to buying a used car there are two basic negotiating mindsets. You can either be fair and decent or unfair and obnoxious. If you seek to chisel and deceive then chances are you will get a bad car. Only the desperate and deceitful are willing to put up with that type of BS.

Want a ‘great’ car? Then realize that many sellers respond extremely well to honesty and decency. Win – win is no sin. So, karma lovers, here’s some tips for negotiating the purchase of a used car by observing the Golden Rule.

Making the Offer

If you’ve followed parts one through three of this series congratulations! You’ve found a car that’s superior to 90-plus percent of what’s out there. Rejoice and let the seller enjoy the benefits of properly maintaining his car.

How to Value the Car

NADA tends to have high valuations while Kelly Blue Book overprices late model vehicles and underprices older ones. Contrary to reality, you can’t find many good $1000 cars regardless of what the Blue Book says. Nor should you get a 2000 Mercury Grand Marquis with over 200k+ for the NADA pie in the sky price of $5000. Stick with Edmunds private party values or, the ‘completed items’ section on Ebay if a comparable vehicle was sold there at ‘No Reserve’.

Negotiate After the Inspection, Not Before

Some folks believe that you should make an offer before the final inspection. I never do.

The reason is that sellers will then get stuck on an unrealistic price if there are major maintenance issues. A $5000 car that needs $1000 in maintenance was never a $5000 car in the first place.

Most sellers will get stuck on that ‘perfect’ number and reject any substantial adjustments. Therefore inspect first, and negotiate last.

How to Negotiate

Begin by declaring your intention to buy the car… so long as the repair costs are addressed in the price.

If these repairs are minor and you’re not interested in a long negotiation, immediately offer to split the difference for the repair costs and call it good. If, however, mission critical repairs run into the high hundreds to thousands of dollars, you have an “opportunity” ahead of you.

Summon the mechanic!

Ask your mechanic to fax the used car’s inspection report to the seller before you speak with them. At first, the seller (and possibly you) may be shocked by the numbers involved.

This can be especially true with older vehicles and luxury cars. However, with a little constructive conversation, even the most alarming repair costs should not kill the possibility of an amicable agreement.

Do The Right Thing

I like to start negotiations for cars with repair “issues” by giving the seller an opportunity to do the right thing. “Given what’s in front of us right now,” I ask. “What would be the fair way for both of us to resolve these repair costs?”

Worst case, the sellers stand pat. In that case, walk. Best case, the seller says they’ll simply lop-off the total bill from the asking price. If that happens, it’s time to shake hands and do the deal.

Compromise

Some sellers begin by offering to reduce the asking price by a very low number. They figure you’re there to haggle (hoping you won’t).

If the first offers by both parties aren’t getting any traction, it’s time to go through the inspection report– and the probable costs of repair– line by line.

Not all repairs are equal

Keep in mind some items are your financial responsibility. Unless it involves a major repair (timing belt, water pump, adjusting the valves, etc.), upcoming maintenance regimens are always down to you.

Don’t sweat the small stuff

In particular, oil changes, tune-ups and replacing filters that aren’t necessary right now should be removed from your list. By doing this from the onset you’re showing goodwill and fairness.

Find an alternative when you need to.

If the seller claims the cost of repair listed in your inspection is too high, ask them if they know of another mechanic who’d be willing to do it for less, and the type of guarantee they will offer. I’ve seen $450 repairs with 30-day guarantees turn into $200 repairs with a full year guarantee. If the car is worth it to you, it pays to explore alternatives that will benefit both of you.

It may take research and patience, but it can be done.

Tit-for tat works wonders

Finally, if you have experience repairing minor automotive issues, use that skill to create some wiggle room to help close the deal.

“You know, I think I could handle that myself. What do you think about us taking off x repair instead? Would a price of y make it a fair deal for both of us?”

Take it or leave it

If you can come to a mutual understanding, enjoy your ride! If not don’t beat a dead horse.

I like to back-out by thanking the seller for their time. Leaving a copy of the inspection report as a “gift” and telling them my final price, should they reconsider. Above all don’t sweat it. There are plenty of excellent used cars out there looking for a good home.

Let’s Recap

To get a great deal: research diligently, test drive patiently, let an expert figure out the unknowns, and negotiate in good faith. Do this and you’ll save unnecessary test drives and thousands of dollars in future repair costs.

You’ll also buy the cream of the automotive crop at an extremely fair price.

[Part one of our used car buying guide is here, part two is here, and part three is here.]

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  • Payam.khodad Payam.khodad on Apr 22, 2019

    thank you for this post. i used this method for buying my new car

  • Periodic Periodic on May 29, 2020

    Great article! I would just add a few more things. You should check the car’s history report. Tools like Carvertical can provide you with useful and important information that even experts might not point out: confirmed mileage, accidents history, usage record such as if the car has been used as a taxi, etc. It could become very strong arguments for price negotiation. Also, you should know your maximum price before negotiating. This way you are more resistant to the seller’s arguments and can firmly hold your position. Don’t forget to tell the price that is lower than your top price, so you would have more space for negotiation.

  • Jeff S Corey--We know but we still want to give our support to you and let TTAC know that your articles are excellent and better than what the typical articles are.
  • Jeff S A sport utility vehicle or SUV is a car classification that combines elements of road-going passenger cars with features from off-road vehicles, such as raised ground clearance and four-wheel drive.There is no commonly agreed-upon definition of an SUV and usage of the term varies between countries. Thus, it is "a loose term that traditionally covers a broad range of vehicles with four-wheel drive." Some definitions claim that an SUV must be built on a light truck chassis; however, broader definitions consider any vehicle with off-road design features to be an SUV. A [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crossover_(automobile)]crossover SUV[/url] is often defined as an SUV built with a unibody construction (as with passenger cars), however, the designations are increasingly blurred because of the capabilities of the vehicles, the labelling by marketers, and electrification of new models.The predecessors to SUVs date back to military and low-volume models from the late 1930s, and the four-wheel drive station wagons and carryalls that began to be introduced in 1949. The 1984 [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeep_Cherokee_(XJ)]Jeep Cherokee (XJ)[/url] is considered to be the first SUV in the modern style. Some SUVs produced today use unibody construction; however, in the past, more SUVs used body-on-frame construction. During the late 1990s and early 2000s, the popularity of SUVs greatly increased, often at the expense of the popularity of large [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sedan_(automobile)]sedans[/url] and station wagons.More recently, smaller SUVs, mid-size, and crossovers have become increasingly popular. SUVs are currently the world's largest automotive segment and accounted for 45.9% of the world's passenger car market in 2021. SUVs have been criticized for a variety of environmental and safety-related reasons. They generally have poorer fuel efficiency and require more resources to manufacture than smaller vehicles, contributing more to climate change and environmental degradation. Between 2010 and 2018 SUVs were the second largest contributor to the global increase in carbon emissions worldwide. Their higher center of gravity increases their risk of rollovers. Their larger mass increases their stopping distance, reduces visibility, and increases damage to other road users in collisions. Their higher front-end profile makes them at least twice as likely to kill pedestrians they hit. Additionally, the psychological sense of security they provide influences drivers to drive less cautiously. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sport_utility_vehicleWith the above definition of SUV any vehicle that is not a pickup truck if it is enclosed, doesn't have a trunk, and is jacked up with bigger tires. If the green activists adhere to this definition of what an SUV is there will be millions of vehicles with flat tires which include HRVs, Rav4s, CRVs, Ford Escapes, Buick Encores, and many of compact and subcompact vehicles. The green movement is going to have to recruit millions of new followers and will be busy flattening millions of tires in the US and across the globe. Might be easier to protest.
  • Sckid213 I actually do agree that most Nissans are ultimately junk. (I also think many BMWs are also). I was talking challenging the 3 in terms of driving dynamics. Agree all were failures in sales.
  • THX1136 More accurately said, we are seeing exponential growth in the manufacturing capabilities in this market. Unless, of course, all those vehicles are sold with customers waiting until more a produced so they can buy. Indeed, there are certainly more EVs being purchased now than back in 2016. Is demand outstripping manufacturing? Maybe or maybe not. I sincerely don't know which is why I ask.
  • ToolGuy The page here (linked in the writeup) is ridiculously stupid https://www.tyreextinguishers.com/how-to-spot-an-suvLike, seriously stupid, e.g., A) Not sure that particular Volvo is killing the planet as quickly as some other vehicles we might choose. B) A Juke is "huge"??? C) The last picture shows a RAV4 Hybrid?
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