By on April 26, 2012

Big news today; the Ford Shelby GT500 apparently packs 662 horsepower in addition to its 200 mph top speed. The big question now is “why?”

The opening paragraph was written by our cherished Editor, Derek Kreindler. I’m here to answer the question posed within. In fact, I will provide multiple answers.

Let’s start with bragging rights. Chevrolet has been playing the numbers card in the ponycar wars since the dawn of time, often to obscure the fact that Ford had a better idea at the time. Remember how easily the five-liter Fox Mustang danced around the ‘Vette-engined IROC-Z? What about the turbocharged SVO, which couldn’t hang with the Tuned Port Z28 in a straight line or even around a skidpad but easily dusted the third-gen F-body on real roads? More recently, the LS3-engined Camaro SS has had the power edge on the retro-Mustang but hasn’t managed to win the hearts and minds of the journos or the track-rat crowd.

Ford knows there’s a group of people out there who want the biggest number, and instead of trying to do it with their V-6 or normally-aspirated V-8 cars, they’re bringing it at the top end. The new Shelby doesn’t just bitch-slap the rare-on-the-ground ZL1: it exceeds the Corvette ZR1’s published number. In the real world, the ZR1 is too light for the Shelby to threaten, but in the real world, the owners of these cars are mostly sixty-year-old drywall contractors. Ford’s got the bragging rights.

Next up, the turbo Hayabusa issue. Human beings adjust to acceleration. It’s a fact. The regional-jet-set barely notices the monstrous push of a full-throttle runway takeoff. Formula 1 drivers complained that the 2.4-liter V-8 cars, which were capable of reaching 200mph on many road course straightaways, felt ‘poky’ because they were used to the V-10 racers. Last, but not least, we have all the people who turbocharge their Suzuki Hayabusas because 9.8-second quarter-miles at 144mph just don’t get it done after a while. The current Shelby is fast as hell, but as I found out last year, you get used to the thrust in short order. Let’s have more of that, then.

Last but not least, there is the sheer exuberance of it. Maybe you haven’t noticed, but resources are getting scarce in this world and the United States no longer sits at the head of the table when it’s time to chew ’em up. Your children won’t have a chance to buy something like this. It might not be illegal to own one, but it won’t be cheap or easy, either. If you want to experience six hundred and sixty-two horses pulling you down the streets of your hometown like a Apolloian chariot hitched to the sun itself, now’s the time. There won’t be much of a tomorrow. Ladies and gentlemen, I present the 2013 GT500. Raise your glasses, perhaps for the last time.

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108 Comments on “2013 Shelby GT500; 662 Horsepower, 200 MPH. WHY???...”


  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    The big question now is “why?”

    Because Jack Baruth. That’s why.

  • avatar
    Philosophil

    See the discussion on ‘status’ below…

  • avatar
    28-cars-later

    America… F*** YEAH!

  • avatar
    86er

    It’s called “making hay while the sun shines”.

  • avatar
    jz78817

    I’m old enough to remember when a 400+ horsepower V8 would be a temperamental, non-idling, shaky, barely drivable son-of-a-bitch. 600+ hp from something you could drive every day is pretty neat.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    AMG still make twin turbo V12s… and they want to put one in a G-Wagen

    why?

    F*** you, that’s why

    there’s always going to be a percentage of the population that gravitates towards this

  • avatar
    67dodgeman

    Once you get beyond the bounds of a toyota appliance, you could ask that question of any vehicle. No one “needs” a porsche, just like no one “needs” a mustang. Very few people “need” a pickup. In places with mass transit, no one “needs” a car period. As people, though, we like to differentiate ourselves from the herd. Clothes, styles, accessories, toys, cars, bikes, houses, trophy wives/husbands, etc. all contribute to the image. There will always be that one car which is the most powerful, just for people like that. Unfortunately modern technology has pushed that to the outer bounds of reality with a vehicle that can never exhibit it’s full potential on any public street.

  • avatar
    aristurtle

    “But Carroll, I can’t drive an American car. An American car only does 160, and that’s all there is to it, and I need a car that does 180 or better to get to work!”

  • avatar
    86er

    “If you want to experience six hundred and sixty-two horses pulling you down the streets of your hometown like a Apolloian chariot hitched to the sun itself, now’s the time. There won’t be much of a tomorrow.”

    We heard this in the 70s too. Maybe the end of history will be granted another reprieve…

  • avatar

    I got pulled over yesterday for doing 65 in a 30. It used to be a 45 but, they arbitrarily changed the limits to set up a speed trap. Problem is, when you ride a supercharger, you get from 0 – illegal in just a second or so. Fortunately I talked the cop out of a ticket and adding points to my fragile license. I’m telling ya, GOVERNMENT HAS GOTTEN TOO BIG.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      In this case, 100% agreed. The same goes for the military. And the drug war. And the bedroom police.

      Just don’t let the rich manipulate you into using this simple buzzphrase to wipe out your Social Security and your national parks and your local library. Not ALL government is bad – just the bad parts.

      • 0 avatar
        300zx_guy

        why is that whenever responsible conservatives talk about reducing the size of government, liberal fearmongers always try to get us to think that this means SS, parks and libraries (and police and firefighters)? Parks and libraries are some of the good things government does, and SS can be reformed without being wiped out, as you say, and be better off for it. If you’re going to go political on a car site, how about something more interesting than repeating your side’s nonsense talking points?

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Bigtruck’s bigger problem isn’t going to be government. It is going to the corporate raiders at his insurance company that will only be more than willing to jack up his rates.

        But the point about capricious changes in road rules is totally a big concern. Around these parts (which I believe to be close to where BTS lives) speed limits are changing for the worse and stop signs are being added where none were before. Those added signs I run with impunity, but I wondered why all the changes….seems that a lot of moms and dads complain to the town and they start adding stop signs without any studies of traffic, and they have turned many a road into lollipop stop sign land.

        Jack, what’s with the drywall contractor bit? I take that to mean that buyers of fast American cars are mostly blue collar and of limited education but managed to “make it” out of a working class existance? Talk about stereotyping….being that I am thinking how nice it would be to have a ZL1 Camaro convertible…and I am certainly not blue collar…

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        I mean that most of these cars are purchased as rewards for a long career of successful effort, and that they are purchased by people who don’t necessarily plan on racing or crashing them. The GT500 has a very different buyer set than, say, the M3. No value judgment implied.

      • 0 avatar
        JustinM

        @300zx_guy

        Because there are a lot of conservatives who *do* want to end SS, drill for oil in national parks, and defund public libraries. You may not be one of them, but they exist, and they run for office.

        If you don’t want to be lumped in with them, complain to THEM and get them to stop it instead of whining that you’re “not all like that”, in the same way that sensible liberals should complain to the people who think that trees have feelings rather than whining that we’re “not all like that”.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Got it, Jack. Maybe I’m too sensitive sometimes…though I’d love to drive a car like this on a track, I’d hope to skip the crash part…

    • 0 avatar
      another_pleb

      Speed limit signs are pretty easy to spot if you are looking for them and even if you happen not to the sign, there are usually a few clues such as the presence of a foot-path (sidewalk), street-lights, houses and driveways or a sharp bend / blind summit.

      I see people driving badly every day, the biggest problem is not excessive speed, they just aren’t bloody looking where they’re going. The thought of some dozy numpty getting his hands on a 662bhp Mustang and driving around half-asleep fills me with dread.

      Humans may very well be good at getting used to acceleration but concentrating on driving for periods of more than 20 minutes is something that we don’t seem to be able to do yet.

      • 0 avatar
        mshenzi

        Even doing 65 in a 45 zone, you shouldn’t hold anybody but yourself responsible if you get pulled over. That’s neither liberal nor conservative– it’s adult. Same goes for deciding which stop signs apply to you. Maybe a change is heinous, maybe not; if enough people agree with you, try to change it back. But if you get pulled over for breaking a posted law, that’s on you.

      • 0 avatar
        mshenzi

        Even doing 65 in a 45 zone, you shouldn’t hold anybody but yourself responsible if you get pulled over. That’s neither liberal nor conservative– it’s adult. Same goes for deciding which stop signs apply to you. Maybe a change is heinous, maybe not; if enough people agree with you, try to change it back. Meanwhile, like lots of people, I do things that risk getting me a ticket most every day; that a choice to live with. If you get pulled over for breaking a posted law, it’s on you.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        In well handling cars with decent brakes, at least the driver can stop them once he wakes up again. Wallowing around in some ill handling, overgrown tractor, even awake, makes even that problematic.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Lets not forget that the new Mustang won’t really look like a Mustang.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    This is what solid axles are for.

  • avatar
    Zombo

    A better question may be why they still offer the Mustang in that pukey color . It was ugly back in the 70s when originally offered , it’s ugly now !

    • 0 avatar
      Juniper

      Grabber Blue is a fantastic color. Maybe it’s your eyes. Your brain may see a different color than the rest of us. You should see a doctor.

    • 0 avatar
      DubTee1480

      You might be thinking it’s an electric blue or a powder blue. It’s not, it’s quite delicious in person I assure you.

      • 0 avatar
        Educator(of teachers)Dan

        I liked the Kona Blue that they had for a while. That new lime green that is in the Mustang “Build Your Own” at Ford’s website has me drooling too. I like big sedans but that green is almost enough to make me go place an order for one just the way I want it. (Green, V6, Performance Package, that is all.)

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Kona blue was ok, but sort of a plain dark blue, still muted. Grabber Blue has history. A local dealer has one of the green ones in stock. Wow is it eye grabbing! But it still seems more of a reaction to the similar color on the Camaro.

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      Yes, it must be your eyes. It was and is a great color. You can see it coming a mile down the road.

      Cop cars should be painted this color so we can see ’em hiding behind signs and sitting in the breakdown lane, waiting for unsuspecting motorists.

      • 0 avatar
        faygo

        @Educator(of teachers)Dan

        if you liked the Kona blue, the new non-Grabber blue for 2012 (“Deep Impact” is _really_ nice looking. there is a darker red (almost red wine color) as well which is quite handsome.

        the car is completely mental to drive, just completely nuts.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        @Firestorm 500

        Funny you should say that – the Maine State Police have at least one Grabber Blue Mustang in thier fleet of Mustang patrol cars. And Silver, Black, and Red ones. You can pick them out because they have the windows tinted WAY darker than is legal in Maine, all the way around.

        I have to think that a cop that gets assigned a Mustang is a happier one than one who gets to pedal a Crown Brick up and down the Turnpike all day, but I have not had the opportunity to talk to any of them, thankfully.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    No way! Thats the best Mustang color they have! There are plenty of black ones and silver ones and grey ones for the rest of you, give me mine in Grabber Blue please!

  • avatar
    nickoo

    In the future I suspect we’ll all be driving an electric motor car, either fuel cell or battery powered. The instant torque and likely futher advances we could see will make gasoline engine cars forgettable.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Harldy, electric cars may well offer all sorts of advantages over thier gasoline counterparts in the future (I’ve no doubt they will make even the GT-R look quaint), but they will be soulless machines.

      No booming exhuast that rises with RPM and then the crackle and sputtering on deacceleration, no feeling of a powerful engine when you start the car as the engines torque rocks the body over (love that when I start my Mustang up), no manual tranmission to shift, no oil to change, no real connection with your car. You’ll just have instant torque, the sound of air passing over your electric supercar and the noise its tires make.

      I’ll bet in the future when the electrification of the car is complete or they are all hybrids like the Volt – manufacturers will be offering “soundtracks” that harken back to when cars had internal combustion engines tied to the speedometer so that as you go faster the simulated sound of whatever old school gas engine titillates you the most fills the cabin as you race down the road.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTheDriver

        just like this raph … http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwbxqPuzmBE&feature=related

      • 0 avatar
        Dawnrazor

        Circa 1890-1910:
        “Hardly, petrol-powered horseless carriages may well offer all sorts of advantages over their horse-drawn counterparts in the future, but they will be soulless machines.

        No friendly whinnying as I approach the horse and hook him up to the carriage (I love it when Clyde, my favorite mustang, does that), just the popping and banging of a thousand tiny explosions, a stiff seat covered in hide to sit on rather than a saddle on the back of a living, breathing travelling companion, no dung to pick up after, no concerns about being stranded due to lack of water or injury to the horse, the familiar odor of livestock being replaced by the pungent black smoke of burning petroleum. You’ll just have a lifeless machine.”

  • avatar
    chaparral

    Well, you might not be able to buy a 3700-lb, 650-hp monster in twenty years – but you might be able to buy a 1100 lb car with 4×50 hp electric motors.

    Power, speed, and muscle might go away.

    Acceleration and fun won’t.

    • 0 avatar
      wsn

      Agreed. 662 horsepower is for those who didn’t have enough education to understand the difference between “power” and “acceleration”. It would be more informative to just list the 0-60mph time (plus 0-10, 0-20, etc, if you are interested).

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Nice snarky comment

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        662 horsepower is for those with at least enough education, to realize acceleration is measured in terms of X-Y mph, with X often being substantially higher than 0 :)

        I like the 1100lb idea, though. Even with “just” 200hp, it ought to be an absolute hoot. But so is 662 hp. And, for the Shelby’s intended market, 662hp at 60, beats an 1100lb hearse.

    • 0 avatar
      Dawnrazor

      Having been a lucky enough soul to (very briefly unfortunately) sample the goodness of the Tesla Roadster, I concur 1000%.

      Given that we can probably consider the Roadster the “Model A” of the electric car world, I’d say there’s MUCH to look forward to in the future!

      I know people lament the lack of man-machine connection with an electric car, but this is unnecessary. There’s just a shift away from moving parts toward electronic parts, which are just as interesting, challenging, and rewarding to work on as ICEs; a different skill-set is required, but the underlying thought processes and approach to troubleshooting is basically the same.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Horsepower is nice, but what are its torque numbers?

  • avatar
    blowfish

    U “F” looky, most of the time cops just wrote u a tix.
    I got looky several times, they just flash the gum ball for a sec.

  • avatar
    grzydj

    Because a Subaru BRZ with its measly 200 HP simply isn’t enough.

  • avatar
    blowfish

    Is close to buck fifty for a litre of benzene in Van bc, how often can u lay rubber?

  • avatar
    TW4

    Why do I get the feeling that aging baby-boomers are living out their childhood fantasies with my tax dollars (again)?

    I have no problem with mega powerful cars b/c they use roughly the same horsepower to maintain speed on the motorways, but now that the auto manufacturers are living on loaned money and borrowed equity, why is funding being dedicated to these kinds of products?

    Profit? I can make money selling weapons, toxic debt, and pyramid schemes, but the government says no b/c it doesn’t produce anything good. If something like this is going to be developed, it should have some purpose. At the very least these cars should be in professional road racing series for the entertainment of all people. Sadly, Ford doesn’t race the Shelby Mustang in a high-profile series, and manufacturers are too lazy to lobby for decent rules that allow for an entertaining spectacle. They put their best V8 engines in tube frames and then drive them in circles for 4 hours.

    Mega-Muscle Cars: Baby-boomers, well beyond their expiration date, trying to demonstrate competence in the modern world, but failing to produce any semblance of lucidity.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      I think you’re mistaking Ford for GM and Chrysler.

      Ford isn’t ‘living on loaned money’, at least not yours – and its stock just received a bump up in investment quality.

      At least this car will be profitable. Your question is better asked of GM’s Volt program and its unprofitable ways.

      • 0 avatar
        TW4

        Ford was bailed out through the DOE not TARP. Ford once officially claimed that they were never bailed out, but it didn’t go over well. I appreciate that they didn’t take TARP, and they got themselves sorted with Federal bankruptcy intervention, but they still received tens of billions in cheap government credit to keep them afloat.

        The Volt serves an obvious purpose. Whether or not it was a good use of Federal funds, compared to the more conservative Toyota hybrid strategy, remains to be seen. Personally, I prefer systems fueled only by gasoline b/c it is easier to monitor energy expenses.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        “The Volt serves an obvious purpose. Whether or not it was a good use of Federal funds, compared to the more conservative Toyota hybrid strategy, remains to be seen. ”

        Not sure what you mean, “remains to be seen”. The sales numbers tell a story – the Volt is not selling well, even with a $7500 taxpayer rebate.

      • 0 avatar
        TW4

        Sure, jkross. Just like the Prius. When it sold 5600 units in 2000, Toyota should have known at the time that it would never sell 181,000 units in 2007, and it would never sell over 100,000 units for 7 consecutive years in the US. They should have known Prius would never sell 300,000 units in Japan in 2010.

        Silly Toyota. What were they thinking? Long term is just a bunch of short terms, every American knows that. If it doesn’t work now, it will never work.

      • 0 avatar
        DubTee1480

        THIS
        I highly disagree with the comment about Ford being being bailed out with DOE loans (that multiple companies were eligible for and had to be used for improvements in factories – Ford’s error was insinuating they received no gov’t help, not that they weren’t bailed out) but we hear so much carping about American companies thinking short term and sacrificing long term health for short term profit. Is the Volt overpriced? Yes. Should it have been a Caddy instead? Maybe. Are they prone to fire? No more than any other car. Did GM overhype the car and possibly try to use it as leverage for the bailouts? Probably and maybe. But you’d have to consider that while the Volt makes little sense in a short term, the long term possibilities of the underlying technology can be adapted to several platforms. Even if the exact system isn’t used in the future, GM’s engineers can only benefit from being exposed to the current program and can use what they learn to adapt the technologies to other programs in the future (even if it ends up being a more traditional hybrid program.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      …..Mega-Muscle Cars: Baby-boomers, well beyond their expiration date, trying to demonstrate competence in the modern world, but failing to produce any semblance of lucidity…..

      You have to be kidding, right? Who cares if a vehicle gets raced in a sponsored series. And funding that is dedicated to a product that sells is a good investment. Mustangs sell and make Ford money, period. Cars like this raise awareness for the brand. I think you need to get into your second hand Corolla and go away…

      • 0 avatar
        TW4

        Subject appears to believe that the world is comprised solely of Mustangs and Corollas. Further analysis necessary, but preliminary diagnosis still points to paranoid schizophrenia.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @TW4

      What high profile road racing series would you suggest for the Shelbys? Probably the FR500 Mustangs would be Ford’s first choice anyway. “Bail out” suggests sinking ship and headed for Davy Jones’ Locker, so when was Ford underwater and drowning?

      • 0 avatar
        TW4

        The only existing classes that fit are FIA GT1/GT3 or ACO GT2. Personally, I don’t find FIA/ACO GT racing to be worth much, but it’s better than Grand Am.

        The guy who lends his name to the vehicle is a racer. Racing in this day and age is a bit of a joke b/c the manufacturers don’t take it seriously. If they want to build race cars from the 1960s, they need to race them, which requires new series and rulebooks. The current spec Hollywood or performance-balanced egalitarianism doesn’t really fit the spirit of muscle cars, does it?

        When was Ford underwater? When their stock was under $2 around Thanksgiving 2009. When a bunch of people purchased the stock b/c they gambled that the DOE would come to the rescue and prevent bankruptcy without TARP intervention.

    • 0 avatar
      naterator

      “Mega-Muscle Cars: Baby-boomers, well beyond their expiration date, trying to demonstrate competence in the modern world, but failing to produce any semblance of lucidity.”

      I’m a pretty smart guy, but I have absolutely no idea what that means.

      • 0 avatar
        TW4

        Old people are trying to prove that they “still got it”, but in the process of designing, manufacturing, marketing, and consuming these cars, which serve no purpose other than the possible decline of our society, aging boomers verify their senility.

        I don’t actually believe that mega-muscle cars serve no purpose, but they are assigned no purpose by the manufacturers. If the cars were racing in some kind of muscle car series, they’d be producing something other than inefficient transportation, but alas.

  • avatar
    Robstar

    Couldn’t they have just added 4 more hp? What happened? Or is this under-rated by 4hp ?

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Some questions are better unanswer

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    The inline ads are hilarious.

    Electric scooters?

    Camry Hybrids?

    This is what I’m interested in if I’m looking at a GT500?

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Whatever . . . I’m o.k. with bragging rights, but I hope the guy who buys this thing for bragging rights understands that this car will get him into more trouble than he can hope to deal with faster than he can even think about it. A car with these kinds of capabilities needs to be driven with respect.

    I’m betting that the coolest thing about this car is the awesome noise it makes when the engine is turned loose. One of the fun things about the ’87 fox-body 5.0 Mustang I once owned was that, at speeds over 100 mph, the entire body just throbbed with the exhaust noise (and my car was totally stock).

  • avatar

    This from the same dude who wrote a thesis on hyper-muscled basement dwelling non-badasses?

    If ever there was the automotive equivalent of benching 300lbs, this is it.

    Not that I have a problem with the GT500; it’s just I’m kinda numb to expensive, fast cars. At this point, they’re all just numbers.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    And the most common question I’ll get from customers about it will still be ‘Why can’t I get it in an automatic?”.

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    Why? Because they want to sell it in Europe as a halo-vehicle.

  • avatar
    beach cruiser

    Jack, buddy, you know I love your write ups more than single malt whiskey, but this rant is so 20 minutes ago. Shelby has already started production of their new Shelby Mustang 1000 which will of course have a giggle inducing 1000 horsepower available to all of the truly serious fanboys. Paraphrasing ZZ TOP here, “my wallet’s fat”. Actually it will need to be morbidly obese. The order banks are open.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      The GT500 will survive 24 hours on a racetrack… I doubt the same is true for the Shelby :)

      • 0 avatar
        faygo

        this ^

        the Shelby 1000 (or the Super Snake or whatever) does not have to pass the same testing protocol as the GT500 does out of the factory. I will also put a lot more stock in the overall tuning capability of SVT vs Shelby. making big power with aftermarket stuff is not hard. making big power and having the cooling to back it up, actually use it for more than a quarter mile at a time is hard.

  • avatar
    kuman

    mmm… how soon will i heard news about one of these wrapping a tree or a pole or whatever? hahahaha

    yeah they detuned it from 666Hp down to 662Hp to make it less obvious. LOL :P

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    As the saying goes, “if I have to explain it to you, you’ll never understand.”

    But you came close: ‘but in the real world, the owners of these cars are mostly sixty-year-old drywall contractors.’ Today my wife and I caught a late lunch at a local fast food joint where a new red Mustang was parked out front. We a young couple in their 20’s and a grey haired man in his 60’s were eating lunch. When we left I expected the red ‘Stang would be still outside, but no, the couple were driving the white Nissan. The 60’ year old had left with the muscle car.

  • avatar

    yawn … is it better than a 5 cylinder 1970s diesel?

    Barely.

    Mercedes 5 Cylinder Turbo Diesel …
    top speed ~300 kph / 186.4 mph
    0 – 60 mph ~4.7 seconds

    Read more at http://www.supercars.net/cars/3018.html

  • avatar
    Ex Radio Operator

    +2 on the 400 horse power cars of the 60’s. Had two of them. Plymouth GTX’s. High maintenance,gas drinking, dollar sucking loads of fun. Starting up that big inch boat anchor was an auditory cacophony of jingling heat riser, (remember those?) throaty exhaust and mechanical noises from under the hood. When you blipped the throttle all the leaves on the trees in the neighborhood trembled, Mothers rushed the children inside where it was safe, the beast was about to be unleashed. Of course all of the big inch cars of the time were handfuls to drive and maintain,but,those of us that drove them accepted the challenge. Better to do that than drive a beige penalty box of the era. Had some of those too. I like the bad boys better. I am not a retired drywall contractor, but, the family car is an STS and my ride is a BRG Miata. I do not putter around, I drive both of them hard. They can handle it, as can I.

  • avatar
    car_guy2010

    In an era of $4/gal gasoline, someone had better have a really good job or whatnot to keep such a car going.

    In the 1960s, this car would be the norm.

    Not that I’d criticize that. I wish I was born 10-20 years earlier so I could drive those fabled cars.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    Why? That´s a relevant question. This is the last 600bhp+ car i want to explore the limits with. “Unsafe at any speed” comes to mind.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    “Why?” indeed. It’s a Ford, after all. A similarly-equipped Chevy Camaro can beat a Mustang any day of the week, it’s always been that way and it always will be, no matter what Ak Miller used to say.

    Best wishes keeping that li’l puppy fed!

    • 0 avatar
      PaulVincent

      Dream on. If Chevy/GM is so good, why has it never been capable of winning the open class at Le Mans of even a race in F1 let alone a championship?

    • 0 avatar
      faygo

      what “similarly equipped” Camaro ? you can’t buy a car from a dealer with this much power, nor will it match the GT500 in most performance metrics which it’s owners are interested in.

      the jury is out on whether ZL1 or GT500 will be faster on a given road course, but based on times which ZL1 owners are getting at the strip, the GT500 will be ahead by whole tenths.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Can’t wait for the obligatory rash of Youtube videos featuring douchebags with “low T” hopped up on Viagra losing control of these things on public roads.

  • avatar

    Why ?
    Why not ?

    Really, they are only going to sell a few thousand at most, a teeny drop in the bucket of forgettable Camcords. Most will end up loved collector’s toys, not daily drivers.

    In the last year I was lucky enough to drive a GT-R, AMG C63, and a Caddy CTS-V. All of these cars, while known to the B and B, aren’t really identifiable to the mass population. They do make my daily driver feel slow, and it is not, (0-60 in 6.5), but nothing is more FUN and more USELESS than 500 hp in a street car. Likewise, most of these cars will also end up as garage queens, not running the kids to school and buying milk. I’m sure the typical owner of any of these cars has at least two other vehicles in the household.

    As for tickets, I find that looks count more than motor. Buy this car sans stripes in grey. I’ve a buddy with a Mini with the stripes and cops can’t stay off him….

    Let them all make a halo for us to lust after. I have still NEVER seen a Lexus IS-F anywhere but the car show, and I live in a place where M class BMW isn’t rare.

    The only issue is the usual group of anti-car folks will point to this being non-PC, etc, which is why so many car makers rate horsepower “conservatively”, like the Germans agreeing on a 155 mph speed cap for mass production cars. The fact that more gas evaporates off driveways every day than all these cars will burn in a week is not relevant to them.

    They can have their bicycles….I’ll happily use three gallons of gas recreationally for a short drive :)

  • avatar
    tonyola

    Ford, along with the other US automakers, have learned how to profitably make low-production limited-edition cars like this. More power to them. To answer the question “Why?”, I say “Because they can.”

  • avatar
    Burnout

    Initially I agreed completely with Jack…that is, the party for these types of cars is coming to an end so get one now. Yet…the more I think about it, the party (in some form) will probably continue. Even as fossil fuel supplies dwindle over the rest of my lifetime (if i’m lucky, maybe another 40-50 years), cars aren’t going away b/c oil/gas is…we’ll simply move to some other form of energy that will become the mainstream (e.g. electric, hydrogen, etc). I can’t imagine companies dropping performance vehicles from their lineup, just because the fuel is no longer gas. I’m guessing that auto manufacturers(as well as aftermarket tuners) will still provide hp for folks to play with!!

  • avatar
    JohnTheDriver

    I really like Mustangs. I like waving to them in my rearview mirror after I pass them.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Come to Summit Point on May 19th, I will give you a chance to wave goodbye to me in one :)

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTheDriver

        Touche Herr Baruth, touche! Alas I shall be vacationing in NOLA that week. CLASH AT THE GLEN perhaps July 1? I believe they allow pony cars into the fun runs on Saturday. I do hope you stick to the BOSS 302. I fear the Shelby and your lead foot would result in TTAC being down their finest contributor.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        I am doing Lemons at Buttonwillow on July 1, but if you’re a Glen local I’m likely to see you near the end of the season.

  • avatar
    alluster

    Why? Because you will be the only survivor if there is a meteor strike with shockwaves at 198 MPH. Because you can move the moon out of its orbit if the need arises. Because that is enough power to tenderize a whale. Because 662 horsepower fixes everything.

    Does anyone know if this will be the first time ever in Ford’s 100 year history they will have a car more powerful than a Chevy? But again this is a Shelby GT500 Mustang. For comparison, a Hennessey Corvette ZR700 produces 705 HP or a CTS-V coupe produces 1000 BHP and top speed of 230 MPH.

    You gotta love some competition in the muscle car segment. Love it or hate it, without the Camaro, V8 mustangs would still be putting out 315 HP.

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    I’ve heard a pre-production one of these. No idea what Ford engineers were doing driving it all the way out here, but I was not complaining.

    The sound this thing makes justifies its existence. Oh my. I hope my neighbor buys one so I can hear it but not have to fill the gas tank.

  • avatar

    I eagerly await my certified used copy of the (black/black, 4 dr, manual trans, sunroof, thx in advance) 950 hp Cadillac CTS-V that will be the great last hurrah of this present Detroit madness. (Actually, Chrysler will probably do something truly epic and stupid with a supercharged V10, but I doubt I’ll be interested.) I figure 2 more generations, max, then it’s all done. That’ll be the one I put away to show my grandkids what the gasoline era was like.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Once upon a time children, cars had internal combustion engines with cylinders arranged in a V configuration, with dual exhausts putting power to the ground via a manual transmission like God himself intended.

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    ‘Your children won’t have a chance to buy something like this. Your children won’t have a chance to buy something like this…It might not be illegal to own one, but it won’t be cheap or easy, either.’

    I still plan on an ’08ish Challenger R/T for my son when he grows up. :)

  • avatar
    beefmalone

    A 5.0 Mustang may have been faster in a straight line, but would get its ass handed to it by an IROC if there were any turns involved.

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