By on April 15, 2011

Under current Cuban law, only cars built before the 1959 revolution can be legally bought and sold. This has kept Cuba’s pre-revolution American cars running, creating the island nation’s unique automotive landscape. But now, reports NPR, proposed liberalizations of Cuba’s property laws might threaten Cuba’s fleet of classic American cars. Though reforms could bring much-needed investment to Cuba, they would also mean an end to the laws that have kept Cuba’s streets looking like a time capsule from the late 1950s. But luckily Cubans have come to feel deeply attached to their classic American cars, vowing to keep them running as symbols of Cuba’s history.

As for Cuba’s classic cars, mechanic Jorge Prats says he thinks they’ll be around for at least another 50 years.

“These cars are a part of our national identity now, like rice and beans, or roast pork,” Prats says as he shows off his two-toned, bright red-and-white 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air coupe. “We take care of these old American cars as if they were another member of the family.”

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53 Comments on “Will Cuba’s Reforms Mean An End To Its Unique Automotive Landscape?...”


  • avatar
    cmoibenlepro

    Isn’t there also a bunch of old soviet Ladas?
    I mean, not on that picture, but on the Cuban roads in general.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      No.  There’s some farm equipment and heavy trucks of Russian origin, probably belching black smoke and/or bleeding fluids, but most Soviet passenger cars have been repurposed as rebar.
       
      What you see on the roads is mostly old American or new Japanese and Korean.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    The article also mentioned it is a lot easier to get replacement parts from the US, which is good news.  The first feature was Cadillac with a diesel motor from a FIAT and a Flintstones vitamin bottle being the brake fluid reservoir.  The relics aren’t the majority of cars in Cuba; just the easiest to buy and sell due to some grandfathering clauses.  Even now it would seem there is a tourism business being built around them.
    When the free sales of these cars is allowed I’m sure HD Theatre will be full of programs where fat guys in Bermuda shorts go to Cuba looking for a car they remember from when they were kids.  Please Raul, do it for the Discovery Channel!

  • avatar
    jaybird124

    Remarkable. How do they keep them all running for half a century and hundreds of thousands of miles? Where do you get the parts??

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      A friend of mine in Trinidad (the city in Cuba, not the island) has a ’57 Bel Air with a Mazda 323 engine and transmission.  Most of the older stuff is kept going the same way.
       
      The cars themselves tend to look careworn: they’re not show queens, they’re daily drivers and they look it, but they’re kept up well.

    • 0 avatar
      Elena

      I kept running a 59 Ford Fairlane until 1994 with the original engine. Some parts I gathered for years (before they broke) from crashed vehicles, some brand new (spares were available because that model was going to be a police car when Castro took power in 1959). The rest was skillfully created using lathes and milling machines. Mine was not typical, foreign visitors asked me to open the hood many times not believing it was original. Many of those cars now have diesel engines coupled to a Russian gearbox and Argentinian Chevy carburetor. The main reason leading to engine replacement was not parts scarcity but fuel prices. By the time I left Cuba one liter of regular gas was $0.85 (US dollar).

  • avatar
    Zackman

    These cars were very simple – they shade-tree manufacture all the parts they need. Someone did a close-up study on several of these and from a distance they look pretty neat, but don’t get too close, as they are patched up, glued and taped together, looking nothing like they were designed to.

    That said, Cuba is still a remarkable time capsule just the same, and many of these cars would fetch a pretty penny if they ever were re-patriated!

  • avatar
    Lemmy-powered

    I’ve spent a fair bit of time in Cuba and I can tell you that although there are plenty of old cars rattling around, there are PLENTY of post-revolution cars. Up until about 1990, most of these were Ladas, Moskvitches and Volgas, but since then, there are Toyotas, Hyundais, etc.

    Heck, I once rode across Havana in a brand-new Passat TDI taxicab.

    As for how the old cars are being kept running for so long, as the poster above wondered, it’s amazing how inventive Cuban mechanics are. Almost all the old cars have long since been repowered by some smaller engine, and many of the body panels now seem to be hand-hammered from whatever steel is handy.

    Cuba’s a fascinating time capsule in many ways, and it’s amazing to see what the people have been able to do in times of shortage. But this idea that no cars have arrived on the island since 1959 is completely false.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Under current Cuban law, only cars built before the 1959 revolution can be legally bought and sold.

    This isn’t quite accurate, and it’s not as much Cuban law as it is American legislation.  Any company that did or does business in Cuba risked American sanctions, and consequently most of what Cuba gets (since Communism collapsed elsewhere) are grey-market imports from other Latin American nations; grey marketers who didn’t have to worry about ever doing business in the United States.

    What Cuban law does is, basically, place heavy restrictions on employment terms, and thusly the earning power of your average Cuban is not high (to put mildly), so not much new stuff is bought or sold at the consumer level.  This is how you can tell that Cuba actually is a Communist nation, while China is really a fascist state that calls itself Communist out of sense of historical obligation.

    • 0 avatar
      cmoibenlepro

      China is fascist?
      I think some people would not agree with that.

      • 0 avatar
        charly

        Fascist is since WWII a four letter word and used as such. China also misses the leader worship to be called fascist when used as a political science term.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Yeah, China is more Iron Heel than anything else.

      • 0 avatar
        MikeAR

        Psar is right, China is fascist by in fact but not name. The state and business are so intertwined that there is little difference between the two. Look at business in Nazi Germany and Mussolini’s Italy and compare them to China today. You will be suprised how similar they are.

    • 0 avatar

      How fascist is China, really?

      I had thought about what Chinese communism really is or means, and now it as a history label makes the most sense. But how do they explain it?

      And if you think china is fascist

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I’m sure, and those people probably didn’t suffer through a few PoliSci courses.
       
      By the classical definition of Fascism, China is a fascist state.  If you compare and contrast the Italian Fascist platform with it, the similarities are striking.
       
      People have a tedency to use terms like “Socialist” or “Fascist” to mean “Something I find ideologically unpalatable”.  That’s ok in that people are entitled to their opinions, but it’s also very subjective and shallow and results in their opinions getting written off in any serious debate.  Or, in other words, it’s equally lame for a Tea Partier to make “Comrade Obama” comments as it is for a member of the idiot Left to label anyone who disagrees with them as a Nazi.

      • 0 avatar
        Jimal

        @psarhjinian, an interesting theory. I would say that China is a hybrid of sorts; “For Profit Communism” as it were. They realized long ago (by watching the Soviet model more than anything else) that the biggest challenge to the Communist political model is that there is no money in it; sooner or later you run out of your own resources and without a means to compete with the outside world it is bound to fail. So China embraces Capitalism… but only to the bare minimum to finance the continuing Revolution. It is relatively easy to undercut your competition when you aren’t concerned with small details like the environment, workers rights, currency manipulation, etc…

        China is still Communist; they just found a way to pay the bills.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        @CJinSD
         
        I would agree with you, except that that China allows several states of affairs that are mutually incompatible with Communism:
        * Employment (in the management/worker sense, where workers are not shareholders in the means of production)
        * Private property
         
        You flat-out cannot have those and call yourself communist.  On the other hand, the lock-step cooperation of business and government, the strict hierarchy and the social interventionism, that’s all textbook fascism.
         
        If you think about the socio-economic-political spectrum as having two axes, where X is economic liberalism, from planned on the left to laissez-faire at the right, and where Y is social liberalism, from liberal on the bottom to authoritarian at the top, then modern China lands solidly in the upper-right quadrant (Cuba is in the upper-left; most Western nations are in the middle of the top two quadrants, most in the right), and it’s drifting further right, though not much further down, as time marches on.
         
        I would say that China remains staunchly authoritarian, but communist in name only.

    • 0 avatar
      Elena

      I’m Cuban and lived there for 40 years. I can tell you until a few months ago no car manufactured after 1959 could be transferred to anybody. Not even inherited when owner died by his/her next of kin. The US embargo had nothing to do with that. It was the law in Cuba, created by the Cuban government. No matter how much money you earned to get a newer vehicle registered under your name you had to break the law (and bribe no less than 5 bureaucrats). If discovered (even years after registration changed) vehicle would be seized. Nothing to do with US restrictions. I saw a 95 Ford Taurus in Havana (imported by Lucius Walker for a priest), two 98 Mustangs, one 97 Cadillac… To let them in owners paid 100% of their invoice price to Cuban customs, and if they leave the country could only sell to the Cuban government. Now it changed but it was Castro’s decision.

  • avatar

    I visited Cuba in late 2002, and I can verify that there were plenty of Ladas on the road.

    A Lada and a 1950s American car drive about the same, namely horribly. The 1950s American cars are a lot better looking, so it’s no wonder the latter are more popular.  There are some ratty 1950s American cars but also a few that would survive a white-glove inspection. It just depends on the resourcefulness and mechanical ability of the individual Cuban.

    I actually saw an Audi A6 during my trip, and it looked as out of place as you would expect. Tourist busses are gleaming new Volvos, while natives make do with this hideous bus-like thing propelled by a semi-truck. I’m sure it was about as comfortable as it looked.

    Cuba has (or had then, anyway) a policy called Tourist Apartheid, where tourists were herded into luxury hotels and given luxury rental cars, while natives were discouraged from fraternizing with them. 

    I can say from experience that fraternizing with real Cubans is a lot more fun. I found a small pension house where the owners gave up their master bedroom for me, and were great friends for the duration of my trip.

    Cubans are resourceful and if the country is ever freed from the shackles of socialism it’s going to become a wonderfully vibrant place.
    Cuba is a beautiful country and a lot of fun to visit.  I wanted to go right back, but then Fidel had the bad taste of sentencing someone who ran a small lending library to 12 years in jail. I couldn’t stomach supporting the regime after that, so I decided to take my tourist dollars elsewhere.

    D

    • 0 avatar
      cmoibenlepro

      “I wanted to go right back, but then Fidel had the bad taste of sentencing someone who ran a small lending library to 12 years in jail. I couldn’t stomach supporting the regime after that, so I decided to take my tourist dollars elsewhere.”

      I think you did the right thing.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Cuba has (or had then, anyway) a policy called Tourist Apartheid, where tourists were herded into luxury hotels and given luxury rental cars, while natives were discouraged from fraternizing with them.

      This is true.  The nice thing is that it’s pretty easy to get out of tourist zones, as well as not particularly unsafe to do so.  Good for you for getting out and about!

      Cubans are resourceful and if the country is ever freed from the shackles of socialism it’s going to become a wonderfully vibrant place.

      This I agree with, but I have some concerns that, when the walls finally come down, it’ll go the way of many of the other OAS states and that the average Cuban’s lot will end up worse, not better.  My hope is that it takes, eg, Costa Rica’s path and not that of Dominica, Haiti or the like.

      Cuba is a beautiful country and a lot of fun to visit.  I wanted to go right back, but then Fidel had the bad taste of sentencing someone who ran a small lending library to 12 years in jail. I couldn’t stomach supporting the regime after that, so I decided to take my tourist dollars elsewhere.

      This is a troubling position for me.  There’s a lot of places in the world that are much nastier, politically and socially speaking, than Cuba.  It’s not good by any stretch, but the average Cuban’s lot is much better than many (most?) Mexicans, even if they’re being oppressed by their fellow citizens rather than their government.  Heck, even our own respective countries (I’m assuming your American; I’m Canadian) have done some suspect things.

      So I guess the question is, how does one reconcile that?  It’s something I have trouble with, myself.

    • 0 avatar
      Elena

      I really appreciate your support! Few understand the money spent in Cuba sooner or later ends in government’s hands. Thanks for refraining to go back even though you liked the place.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Heard this this morning. I loved hearing one owner fire up his Cadillac limo…sporting a soviet diesel motor!

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      Hot Rod Magazine’s feathers will be very ruffled if word of this gets out! Oh, the humanity!

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Engine swaps are easy.
       
      How about engine internals? Apparently it’s pretty common to replace pistons in these cars with ones from Ladas.
       
      BTW, there was an interesting article in a recent Motorcyclist issue about the beloved Harleys running around Cuba.

  • avatar
    Contrarian

    Like some others here, I saw many post-rev Asian cars. Just not American ones. And there are far more repressive regimes around the world that the US does trade with. The US Cuba policy is about Florida elections and avenging for multinationals’ losses, not about human rights.

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      Exactly.  It has nothing to do with Cuba being communist, it has to do with Cuba being independent.  Same thing in Vietnam.  We couldn’t let Vietnam or Cuba become an example to others that they can take matters into their own hands.  This is right from state department documents from the time period btw.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Agreed just look at some of the terrorism that enimated from Miami over the years. Google Posada-Carillas 1976 Cubana Air bombing. How these folks got away with this is mind-boggeling

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    I think it’s all too easy to get misty eyed about many of these older cars, but I’m guessing that the primary reason so many are on the road is that their Cuban drivers have no other choice. If they had the choice (and the money) I’m sure many drivers of these old beasts would trade them in for a new Hyundai in a heartbeat. I used to live in an English market town where the average age of a house was 350 years old. When people see photos of where I used to live they all say “Awww how quaint. It most be wonderful living in such old houses.” It’s not. They’re old, leaky, drafty and were built for 5 foot tall people from the middle ages. I would have lived in a modern house with double glazing and central heating if I had the chance – but there weren’t any!
    Getting misty eyed about the past is fine, but what most people don’t realise is that a lot of the past was crap.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      I get amused over those old European houses you mention, especially when I catch my wife watching “House Hunters International” on HGTV and the wretched dumps they ask a king’s ransom for! It appears there is some law or something where you can’t build anything new!

      • 0 avatar
        charly

        There are regulations there that makes building modern buildings very hard but most of the people who life in those place don’t make their money there. They really choose to life there instead of somewhere else in a modern, and very likely much cheaper, home so you could hardly call it forced.

      • 0 avatar
        Sinistermisterman

        It’s a combination of thousands of ancient dumps being ‘listed’ (ie, heritage status) which stops you from knocking them down, combined with limiting what you can do to the house and the materials you can use. Many ‘modern’ houses in the UK were built in the 50’s and 60’s and are already in worse condition than many of the old Victorian houses and are worse insulated. Then there are the ‘new’ estates which spring up on the edges of towns. These houses are built to the tiniest dimensions allowed by law, with some houses being so small you can’t get a modern sofa in through the front door. Oh, and all the above houses tend to cost above GBP 200k. Which is nuts (and another reason I crossed the pond).

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      “Getting misty eyed about the past is fine, but what most people don’t realise is that a lot of the past was crap.”

      Better correct that to, ” . . . . . but what most people don’t realise is that a lot of the past was crap – to our current standards.”

      In the twenty or so years that I did historical re-enactment, the biggest single job I ever had was convincing the tourists that people back then were warm, comfortable, etc.  People don’t willingly starve and freeze if they have the slightest chance to come up with an alternative.  And 99% of what the modern historical site tourist considers essential didn’t even exist at the time that I was portraying, so how could have the resident back then have missed them?

      Everything is relative, and I long ago discovered that living an 18th-19th century life is doable.  Yeah, harder than we’ve got it today, but once again, all those conveniences didn’t exist.

      • 0 avatar
        Sinistermisterman

        Yes, I guess I should use ‘by our standards’. I agree about the historical re-enactment thing. I spent many years tagging along to English Civil War society gatherings (I like gunpowder!)
        But at the end of the day you’ve gotta think of it this way – if you had to use one every day would you rather have a matchlock musket or a modern hunting rifle? Same goes for the cars.

      • 0 avatar
        geeber

        Men and women worked themselves to death unless they were very rich and could afford servants, which meant a much shorter life span, and they lived with conditions such as chronic dysentery, because of no refrigeration for meat and dairy products.

        If you wanted to have two children live to adulthood, you had to have at least five (because several would die as infants or as toddlers). And with all of those children came the increased risk of your wife dying during childbirth, which happened fairly frequently.

        Many of the diseases we’ve either wiped out or can successfully treat were fatal. I don’t know if I’d say that the majority of people were warm and comfortable. The rich and the middle class who lived in the houses that have been preserved were comfortable, but the majority of people scraped by to survive.

        Life was definitely no bowl of cherries in the 18th and 19th centuries, unless you were really rich, and even then your life wasn’t as clean and healthy as the life of the typical poor person today.

    • 0 avatar
      Elena

      I disagree with you when it comes to cars. I still miss my 59 Fairlane. I wish I could have it here. Can’t think of a Hyundai I would trade it for. Probably not even another Ford. Feel free to call me nostalgic old timer.

  • avatar
    Jerry Sutherland

    As Canadians we have fairly easy access to the world’s longest running car show in Cuba-here are some examples of what kind of iron is hot in Cuba.
    http://www.mystarcollectorcar.com/3-the-stars/stars-in-traffic/1052-march-2011-stars-in-traffic-the-cars-of-cuba.html

  • avatar

    Psarj is correct about this:
    >>>This isn’t quite accurate, and it’s not as much Cuban law as it is American legislation.  Any company that did or does business in Cuba risked American sanctions, and consequently most of what Cuba gets (since Communism collapsed elsewhere) are grey-market imports from other Latin American nations; grey marketers who didn’t have to worry about ever doing business in the United States.
    And Contrarian is correct about this:
    >>>Like some others here, I saw many post-rev Asian cars. Just not American ones. And there are far more repressive regimes around the world that the US does trade with. The US Cuba policy is about Florida elections and avenging for multinationals’ losses, not about human rights.
    The latter is why Al Gore badly disappointed me by coming out opposing repatriating Elian Gonzalez with his father in Cuba,the cuban boy whose mother drowned on the way to Florida in some unseaworthy craft.
    And I suspect that the thing that is most likely to remove the American classic Brigadoon from Cuba is a change in the US policy.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Yeah as a student of Political Science the failed embargo makes my blood boil in a “hey it hasn’t worked in 50+ years but lets keep it up because some people are stupid enough to think that the policy is effective.”  As someone who enjoys a good cigar to relax a few times a month the embargo just honks me off (and the fact that certain politicians who knew the embargo was coming hoarded Cuban cigars right before the embargo took effect.)
       
      Holding certain “enemies” at arms length hasn’t worked, we might as well start throwing our arms around them and see what happens.

    • 0 avatar

      David, most of those big bad “multinationals” that lost assets when Castro stole their property don’t even exist anymore. That was half a century ago. Conservatives oppose the Castro regime because it’s a statist totalitarian government, not because we’re carrying water for multinationals.
       
       
      I’d much rather stand with Oscar Biscet than with the Castros. Who would you rather stand with?

      • 0 avatar
        Ubermensch

        So why do conservatives support many other worse statist totalitarian governments then?   You know the ones that happen to allow US “investment.”  Hypocisy much?  The Castros need to go, but it isn’t up to us to make that happen.  I stand on the side of letting the people of other nations decide what type of governement they will have.

      • 0 avatar
        Patrickj

        @Ubermensch
        You can add all the authoritarian countries with “our” oil under their sand to your list.

  • avatar

    A photographer I know went to Cuba recently. She said she never saw people smiling there. I don’t know if it’s true, but I’m curious if anyone who has been there has the same or a different view.

    • 0 avatar
      infinitime

      I would have to disagree… I was there two years ago, and the people were friendly and generally upbeat.  I am not talking about just the resort, as we ventured out to smaller towns off the beaten track.  Like any society, there are ppl who are less than happy with their circumstances, but for the most part, I viewed it a slightly poorer version of Mexico.  Interestingly enough though, there were medical clinics every few blocks, the schools were clearly the most well-maintained buildings (relatively) in each town.   I also found it interesting that despite being dismally poor (by our standards), most Cubans seems generally proud and in support of the revolution.
      As for cars, new Kias, Hyundais, Mitsubishis, VWs, Seats, Peugeots were aplenty.  I was totally intrigued by Polish Fiat-clone with a rear-engine, seems to be of late 70s early 80s vintage… I know it is a Fiat because the trunk/hood was ALWAYS propped open, even when running.  I guess engines overheat much more readily in the Carribbean sun.    All the police cars I saw were either Kia Rios or older Ladas of the 1990s.
      Most of the tour buses were either Volvo, or some Chinese knock-off which looks suspiciously like the Volvos!

      While there are a few 50s American classics running about, they were clearly in the minority.  BTW, contrary to what ppl may think.  The American embargo doesn’t really change things much.  It seems like every American product that I can find at home, is easily substituted by an European/Japanese/Korean comparable.  No GE air conditioners, but plenty of LG air conditioners.

      While most Cubans can’t afford cars, scooters were quite common, mostly Chinese brands and Yamahas.
       
      Here’s an interesting link:
      http://bestsellingcars.wordpress.com/2010/12/14/cuba-lada-hyundai-geely-vintage-americans-dominate/

      I forgot to mention, the most distinguishing feature I noted of Cuba was the sense that race really didn’t matter. I know it is cliche to say that today, but the harsh reality is that in most American cities, racial differences are seen in everyday life. The neighbourhoods do often reflect social-economic and racial differences in American society. I didn’t see any of that in Cuba. Cubans come in every color, and no one seems to care or notice. That is truly cool.

      • 0 avatar

        I forgot to mention, the most distinguishing feature I noted of Cuba was the sense that race really didn’t matter. I know it is cliche to say that today, but the harsh reality is that in most American cities, racial differences are seen in everyday life. The neighbourhoods do often reflect social-economic and racial differences in American society. I didn’t see any of that in Cuba. Cubans come in every color, and no one seems to care or notice. That is truly cool.
         
        Really? When was the last time you saw a black Cuban government official?

        • 0 avatar
          Elena

          They name a black guy every time they’re about to pass a law which is going to be very unpopular. Once it’s done, quickly replaced by another white person. Saw it many times

    • 0 avatar
      Lemmy-powered

      Never saw anyone smiling there? Nonsense. I wouldn’t say Cubans have fat, dopey grins on their faces, but I’d hardly describe them as totally miserable. I think Americans see the Cubans arriving in Florida in makeshift boats and assume that they’re fleeing hell on earth. It ain’t exactly like that.
      Cubans are, without a doubt, the healthiest people I’ve seen outside of Northern Europe. Surprisingly well educated, too.
      When change comes, it’s going to be interesting to see how people as smart and savvy as the Cubans are will develop their potential.
       
       
       

  • avatar

    We have a female tourist/photographer shooting cars for us in Fidel-land right now. She arrives back this weekend and I will ask her. She probably gets more smiles than average because she fills two suitcases with Walmart clothing to hand out to the locals every visit.

  • avatar
    ErSchmecktGut2

    Whatever Cuba does, it should NOT let the Yanks back in — that’ll ruin everything and Cuba will become another Haiti.
    Why would you do that? For the cars?
    American cars were horrible things in the 1950s, they are still horrible in the 2010s (and drive even worse) besides it’s too late anyway — there’s only oil for some 10-15 years left.
     

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    Under current Cuban law, only cars built before the 1959 revolution can be legally bought and sold.

    Hey Yeah! No! No way!
    Hey! That Cuban Embargo that Kennedy put on us didn’t have any effect on our cars – we passed a law that says that only cars before 1959 could be legally bought and sold. If it wasn’t for our law, we’d be driving brand new cars! Because we are dripping in cash baby! Our Fidel showed the world how to make a bright future for everyone! This is paradise! A worker’s paradise! Everyone here is equal! Everyone has access to our rich heritage regardless of who they know or their class! Everyone is free here baby!

    So nuh-uh! The US didn’t break up with us – WE BROKE UP WITH THEM! We love us these cars! We had to pass that law! The stuff they were foisting on the Americans was crap! We don’t need no stinking Mustangs! Camaros? They suck! Did you know that Ralph Nader exposed the American system of killer cars with the expose. He spared all of us here on the island. We knew what we were doing! Banning all those crappy deadly cars here in Cuba!

    So we have a unique automotive landscape that only demonstrates our superior government landscape, thanks to our leader, Fidel Castro – now his brother, Raul!

    We have taken all the progressive steps that our brothers up north struggle to realize! Free health care! We got it, bro! It doesn’t matter who rich you are, we got you covered! And if you are rich, well, we got you covered even better – but it don’t matter – no way! You need to get a baby birthed, we have someone right here to get that baby birthed, free of charge!

    And we have an ambulance to take you to our free hospitals. A 1958 DeSoto – now that’s a ride! Not one of those crappy helicopters like you guys have back in the States, nah, we have a real ambulance that everyone in this part of the island cherish and lovingly take care of.

    It’s paradise here! Really! Just agree with me! If you don’t you might find yourself in a little concrete cell.

    WE LOVE IT HERE!
    Honest!
    Just keep smiling!
    That embargo didn’t work!

    Are they gone now?
    Good, now give me back my shoes!

  • avatar

    Will do David. I never thought about the parts angle, especially since she will have empty suitcases for the trip home.

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