By on January 22, 2011

Porschephiles: How do you like the marvelous scent of diesel? You know, the stuff they sell at the big truck stops to those people with the big Mack trucks? Automotive News gives Porsche lovers heart palpitations with the news that Porsche is considering selling diesel versions in the United States.

The nameplates considered for oilburners are the Cayenne SUV and the Panamera. An oilburning Cayenne might be tolerable. There is a diesel Cayenne in Europe. Too bad it’s only a meek 3 liter engine. There is a  4.2 V8 TDI from the Touareg that produces so much torque (800 Nm) that there is a computer in the transmission that keeps it from being ripped apart. That could do well here.

But a diesel Panamera? Why not a diesel 911? There is no diesel Panamera in Europe – yet. Automotive News has heard that diesel and gasoline-electric hybrid versions of the Panamera might be shown in Geneva, with a summer introduction in Europe.

This is no idle chatter. “We are discussing internally if we should introduce the Cayenne diesel in the U.S. this year. Also a Panamera diesel is an option,” Bernhard Maier, Porsche’s sales and marketing chief, told Automotive News.

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36 Comments on “Fill A Porsche With THAT?...”


  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    A diesel with massive turbos and at least 9 gears would be epic.  Leaving stoichiometric ratio behind and running high compression with cheap fuel ftw.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve65

      Cheap fuel? Maybe where you live. Where I live, diesel is currently 10¢ more per gallon than premium, at $3.579/gal.

    • 0 avatar

      Steve65… by its very nature Diesel is “cheap fuel”. It is barely-refined bunker oil. In days of yore (before governments woke up to the revenue opportunity) Diesel was always half the price of gasoline. When gas first broke the $1 per gallon barrier in the late 70s, early 80s, Diesel was around .50¢ a gallon. I can recall paying ~.65¢ for the stuff into the early 90s. It remains relatively cheap, when not road taxed, but when you buy Diesel at the pump nowadays a significant chunk of the cost is taxes. Much more than gasoline by percentage, so the price you see at the pump is artificial when compared to the actual product in the tanks. Yes, we have ULSD now, but at its core Diesel is still cheap bunker oil when compared to highly refined alternatives at the other pumps.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve65

      Well, hell. If we’re just going to dismiss and ignore parts of the cost that area actual out of pocket costs, lets pretend we don’t have ot pay for it at all. BTW, where I live, the state tax on Diesel and Gasoline is the same. The total tax difference is about 8¢. I don’t think that accounts for the 40¢ difference between regular unleaded and diesel, but ymmv.

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    A diesel Porsche somehow seems less blasphemous to me than a hybrid, especially if its a boxer.

  • avatar
    mpresley

    Inasmuch as Audi is able to consistently win at Le Mans with the stuff, why shouldn’t Porsche jump on the wagon?

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Because even a coal fired, steam engined car could win LeMans if the rules were written the “right” way.
       
      As far as I know, engine power to weight ratios, for all engine weights where gassers are made, favor gas over diesel, which makes them more suitable for what most people want out of performance cars.
       
      “Driveability”, at least in the traditional sense with a manual transmission, also vastly favors gas over any diesel I have experienced, although the latest fashion for computerized manumatics may have rendered that less relevant for most buyers. You can’t even buy the Panamera with a manual here. Heel and toe downshifting a laggy turbodiesel at the limit of tire adhesion, when a mishap cold send you flying backwards off a canyon side, is hardly my fantasy about what Porsche ownership is supposed to be like.
       
      Also, Porsches should go like stink, not just stink.

    • 0 avatar

      Thanks Suki.  Your post tells me a lot about diesel drivability.  I didn’t realize there was so much subtlety in slip angles, throttle and the engine when heel toe shifting.

  • avatar
    blowfish

    they sell these cars to people with too much money & lesser brain, so if it can make car run owners dont care.
    If they could stuff that racing Audi diesel in it then would probably be OK.

  • avatar
    vaujot

    Porsches with Diesel engines are nothing new.
    See http://www.google.de/images?hl=de&rlz=1T4DVXE_deDE311&q=porsche%20diesel&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porsche#Tractors

  • avatar
    stuki

    The full to empty highway range of a Panamera with a moderate sized diesel would be epic. Wouldn’t be much of a sportscar, but as a transcontinental express for the pump averse, it could be quite nice. Perhaps Mad Max’s chariot of choice for the post apocalyptic Aussie outback.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    When it comes to fleet efficiency the weakest links are the SUV and the Pan. All depends on fuel prices as gasoline is about .50/gal less than diesel here in the Midwest.

    Stop-start technology might be better selling point for this halo brand.

  • avatar
    Sgt Beavis

    Gimmie Torque!

  • avatar
    blowfish

    You can’t even buy the Panamera with a manual here. Heel and toe downshifting a laggy turbodiesel at the limit of tire adhesion,

    Panamera handles like Exon valdez, anybody serious about driving fast will buy such a car?
    the very reason is to dilute the CAFE mpg average her up, so the fine can eases up a bit.
    anybody who spend close to a hundred grand for a car will worry about a $120 fill up?
    a new Turbo Porsche gets close to 20 mpg, to a bloke who blew 120 grand, is going to make a difference? They only need 2 grand to do the brake, the rotors cannot be shaved >2x.
    Only thing comes out if these oel burners are, they will shine in a cocktail, as they can justify as being green conscious of using bio-diesel ( even B5 % is still enviro-correct ).

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    Buying a petrol car for long drives is just retarded.
    Diesel gives loads of power at low rpm.
    Petrol cars suits pure sports cars, but the majority of people don´t want a sports car.
    Be honest; How many of you drives on the edge most of the time?
     

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Hey if I could afford it I’d keep an early 1990s diesel Mercedes around just for long drives but that’s not in the cards and my commute is just 10 miles one way, not enough for a diesel to even get properly warmed up. 

  • avatar
    MarcKyle64

    Not to threadjack…but why hasn’t Porche used the Wankel rotary in it’s lighter bodied cars like the Boxster?  Rotaries are compact, high revving and are very power efficient per cubic inch simply because there’s twice as many powerstrokes per revolution.  Hell, wasn’t Wankel German?  (checks Wikipedia), yep, so it’d be a wholy Germanic vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      mazder3

      Continuing on this threadjack, why doesn’t Mazda sell Porsche some Hydrogen RE powerplants?

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      3 reasons:
      1. Rotaries wouldn’t help Porsche with fuel economy. They may be compact but they drink like a V8 and are even trickier with emissions.
      2. They don’t hold the right patents to do so.
      3. Tradition. Flat sixes (and maybe fours in the future) is what Porsche does in sports cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      Porsche should license the Ecomotors design, or derive their own from the Junkers Jumo..

    • 0 avatar
      AlexG55

      carguy: I think the Porsche engine tradition is generally pancakes- they’ve built cars with flat-fours (356 and 912), flat-eights (804, 908) and flat-twelves (917) as well as the traditional six. The only ones they haven’t built are a flat-twin and a flat-10…

  • avatar
    MarcKyle64

    Not to threadjack…but why hasn’t Porche used the Wankel rotary in it’s lighter bodied cars like the Boxster? Wankel was German, yep, so it’d be a wholy Germanic vehicle.  It also turns out he licensed his design to Porche back in 1965. Rotaries are compact, high revving and are very power efficient per cubic inch simply because there’s twice as many powerstrokes per revolution.  So why haven’t we seen a Porche with a rotary?

  • avatar

    Having driven identical Saabs and VWs with gas & diesels, diesels do excel on constant or long-distance driving. The engines change your whole way of driving. Id never recommend a diesel if your not putting at least 50 miles a day on.

    That truck stop picture is quaint…diesel hasnt been near $1.39 for some time and I doubt well ever see it again. And a BIG reason diesel cars have barely taken off here is the maybe 40 Cetane tractor fuel that rig burns. Its tough to make smooth, quiet-running, tough emission-passing, non EGR valve clogging diesels with this stuff.

    And Wankels that last more than 80K without blowing seal rings are rare.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    Why is diesel more expensive in the usa?
    In Europe petrol is more expensive.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      Tax preference for diesel in much if not most of Europe, vs a slight tax disadvantage across much of the US.  Plus, what refineries the US has are geared towards gasoline production.  Additionally, much of the US housing stock still runs on oil heat, so during the home heating season petrodiesel competes with home heating oil.
       
      Me, I think the US should offset the cost of providing freedom of the seas and access to the mideast oil supplies into a “security fee” on gasoline, and leave diesel alone since taxing it would be more directly inflationary (transportation of goods and industrial/commercial vehicles rely on diesel).

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    Ugh, ugh, ughhh – diesels. I was in Spain last june, and I kept hearing garbage trucks come up from behind, and seeing S-Classes and 7-series go by. It was disgusting – a whole country full of cars that sound like dying old men.

    Diesels are fine for big trucks, but in sedans or sports cars?! It’s like seeing a supermodel talk with Christopher Walken’s voice.

    • 0 avatar
      Buckshot

      Yeah yeah.
      Let´s be honest here.
      A Mercedes S-class diesel does not sound like a dump truck.
      If so i sound like Cindy F*cking Lauper, and a corvette sounds like a tractor from 1930.

      In fact my diesel does not sound anything until you get above 100mph

    • 0 avatar
      fincar1

      I’m another one who doesn’t think that either Panamera or Cayenne owners want to be mistaken for the UPS van coming up the driveway.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    “A Diesel Porsche? Why, Jack Baruth must be rolling over in his grave.”
    “Psst, Mr. Baruth is not dead.”
    “What? He’s not dead? Really?”
    “Yes.”
    “Are you sure?”
    “Definitely.”
    “Oh. Well, if he were dead he’d definitely be rolling in his grave. Definitely.”

  • avatar
    Darkhorse

    Will they be air cooled?

  • avatar
    fincar1

    Well, my father once owned a piece of construction equipment, a compactor, that was powered by an air-cooled Deutz diesel engine. It was a v-configuration; I don’t remember the number of cylinders. I remember it being quite trouble-free.

  • avatar
    blowfish

    Deutz make some real good diesel air cooled engines.

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