By on January 27, 2010

Back when GM was going through its recent bankruptcy bailout-related unpleasantness, Toyota’s Yasuhiko Ichihashi told the AP that “Toyota was only hoping for an overall recovery for the U.S. auto industry, including GM.” Months later, then-Toyota President Katsuaki Watanabe even suggested that “it’s not something we would bring up on our own, and we don’t know enough about the restructuring plan, [but] if some talk about supporting GM comes up, we would like to consider it earnestly.” Now that Toyota is in a spot of PR trouble over its unintended acceleration woes, you might expect that GM would show the same class and tact that Toyota did just months ago… but you’d be wrong.

Dow Jones [via CNN Money] reports that GM is going for the jugular, offering $1,000 cash or zero percent financing for Toyota owners looking to buy a GM. The General isn’t going to be advertising the deal nationally, because of the obvious unclassyness of the move, and an “aw shucks” quote is all we get from GM retail General Manager Steve Hill.

It gets down to having customers in the showroom, and we have customers saying ‘We don’t want these cars anymore. There are some customers looking to find out more about us right now.

In a completely unrelated story, the United Auto Workers have decided that Thursday would be a good day to protest Toyota as “a danger to America” (in cooperation with the Teamsters) in front of the Japanese Embassy in Washington DC. The accusation?

After receiving millions in the taxpayer-funded Cash for Clunkers bailout, Toyota plans to close its New United Motors Manufacturing Inc. (NUMMI) assembly plant in Fremont, CA, which will mean a loss of 5,400 direct jobs and up to 50,000 jobs at suppliers and other supporting businesses. This would be the biggest factory layoff in California since the beginning of the recession. Toyota is also endangering 5,000 middle class jobs in the carhaul industry.

Environmental advocates at the event will express their disappointment that Toyota, a company that markets itself as a leader in emissions reduction, will greatly expand its carbon footprint by shipping vehicles once made at NUMMI back to the U.S. from Japanese plants.

Toyota‘s management decisions come at a time of much concern about the company, which had more recalls than any other auto maker in 2009 and has just halted production and sales of 8 models until its spontaneous acceleration problem is resolved.

Hooo boy.

1) Toyota didn’t “receive” a “C4C bailout.” Cash for Clunkers was a consumer incentive. 2) GM pulled out of NUMMI, leaving Toyota with little choice but to pull out. 3) GM did “receive” billions in TARP bailout before pulling out of NUMMI. But why would the UAW protest a company they own roughly 15 percent of? Finally, 4) You stay classy, domestic auto industry!

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70 Comments on “GM, UAW Capitalize On Toyota’s Recall Woes...”


  • avatar
    Buick61

    Please. Toyota has played dirty for years. This is business.

    Further, GM’s problem was financial in nature–their customers weren’t being physically harmed. So GM’s situation is not analogous to Toyota’s, whose customers are actually dying in their products.

    That’s a terrible, disingenuous, and condescending parallel to draw.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Exactly. Just because GM made subpar products for decades, stranding many of their loyal customers in snow storms or other forms of bad weather… that proves they are a much better company than Toyota! Toyota, who just sits idly by while their customers are dying in their cars!! I mean, how morally bankrupt are they????

      I mean, that is such a far cry from GM products where we just won’t stand behind what they sell.

      Yeah, GM’s a model company.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      The problem with the parallel being made is that when Toyota officials made those comments they were at least trying to sound magnanimous; they either were about to or just had passed GM for their brief stay as the world’s largest automaker. I can’t remember the timing of those comments, vis-a-vis “cash 4 clunkers”, but there was a backlash building over the percentage of Toyota models being bought through the program.

      On the other hand, you have GM, who has been on its heels (mostly of its own making) and who was caught out by the oil crunch last year. They have no reason to be gracious; they’re in a scrap. GM isn’t in a position to be magnanimous here.

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Kluttz

      Building cars people actually want and keep going and going is playing dirty?

      GM must be the cleanest playing company on earth.

      Your comment is offensive. Toyota has made a mistake, a huge one, but nonetheless a mistake. This will happen as long as companies are run by humans. At least they don’t beat their chests about new models and then design those cars to do a 360 when you apply the brakes (Citation), or simply self-destruct around you at around 50000 miles (any Cadillac), or blow intake manifold gaskets by the millions and millions (any Chevy V-6 in the 90’s) and DON’T DO A DAMNED THING ABOUT ANY OF THEM. Toyota has been kicking everyone’s (except Honda’s) asses with quality now for about 35 years. If that is playing dirty, then I hope Toyota AND Honda keep playing dirty. Forever and ever. Toyota WILL come out of this OK.
      But I’m still glad I drive a Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      asdfghjkl

      “GM would show the same class and tact”? The big difference between GM and Toyota is Toyota will stab you in the back and GM will let you know upfront. Toyota is a very hypocritical and underhanded company. The Japanese government sees to it that no major auto company can compete in Japan. Read below how Japan have rob our industries. It makes for a long read but it might wake up some Americans.

      http://www.uwsa.com/issues/trade/japanyes.html

  • avatar
    Odomeater

    Anyway, Toyota owners now have low interst on a safer car than their current deathtrap. GM only helping the consumer by giving some financial relief to poor Toyota owners suffering from plummeting trade in values. I like to put a positive spin on it.

  • avatar
    mikey

    WHAT!….. Toyota never capitalized on GM mistakes? All’s fair in love and war eh?

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I’m certainly not going to defend GM, but C4C unquestionably put a pile of government cash in all the manufacturers’ pockets, and Toyota probably got more than anybody. According to Consumer Reports, of the top 6 cars purchased with C4C funds, 3 were Toyotas, including Corolla at number 1.

    Good point about NUMMI though.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert.Walter

      How long before Justice & DOT begin investigating to see if Toyota delayed publicizing their plight until a) they had a solution, b) they waited until C4C was over, c) they were waiting for the market to recover, (each assumes TMC realized they had a problem worthy of taking action on.)

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Justice or the DOT would have to start with the NHTSA first, wouldn’t you think? Isn’t this kind of thing really their purvey?

      That said, there’s probably a bias against SUA and SLOC complaints at the NHTSA and among the automakers: it is true that the bulk of these complaints have tended to be driver error.

    • 0 avatar
      asdfghjkl

      After the US government gave all that money to the Japanese cars for the C4C program, Japan excluded American cars for their C4C in Japan. This is just another example at how Japan operates, even in spite of having a closed auto market.

      http://www.autoblog.com/2009/12/11/report-detroit-three-call-japans-cash-for-clunkers-program-unf/#startposts

  • avatar
    gslippy

    GM’s approach to such a problem would be to obfuscate and delay as long as possible. At least Toyota stepped up.

    GM is in no position to throw stones over quality:
    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/total-recall-ten-largest-auto-recalls-of-all-time/

    You could count on two hands the number of Toyota customers who will be lured with $1000 to buy a GM. Toyota might be offering $2000 in two weeks in order to beg forgiveness.

    And the UAW/Teamsters statement reads like it was concocted by a junior high debate team. NUMMI is not an entitlement program, but you’d think so from their complaint.

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    Odomeater
    January 27th, 2010 at 6:30 pm

    Goodbye Toyota and good riddance. Enough of your lies and trying to deny for years the problems with all your junk. Now that their are confirmed deaths, you “step up” and issue a massive recall. Despicable.
    ________________________________________________________

    My wife was almost killed when the rear bumper from an Oldsmobile fell off the car from rust and went through her windshield, front seat back, rear seat back and embedded itself in the trunk.

    Notice the ONLY Toyota vehicles affected by the recall were using Canadian supplied parts, not the Denso units in cars built overseas. It doesn’t speak well for North American suppliers.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert.Walter

      Re. the bumper: I agree they shouldn’t fall off of vehicles in public. I suggest you write letters to your elected officials and ask them why they allow obviously worn-out and unsafe vehicles to carry a license tag and cruise on your roads (same question would apply to Toyota frame-rust-thru issue – imagine a bouncing spare-tire coming thru your windscreen.)

    • 0 avatar
      asdfghjkl

      Let me enlighten you on rusty vehicles. You can not find any worst rust buckets than Toyota vehicles. They have the worst reputation of that problem.

      http://www.thebostonchannel.com/investigative/19294250/detail.html#

      http://www.autoblog.com/2009/04/29/reports-of-aggressively-rusting-toyota-pickup-frames-mounting/#content

    • 0 avatar
      asdfghjkl

      Now, go blame Toyota suppliers for Toyota’s problem. Get real! GM could also do the same for past problems. You must be one that believe, this can not be happening to the Teflon coated company called Toyota.

  • avatar
    vento97

    If I were Government Motors – I wouldn’t do too much crowing these days…

    Pot, Meet Kettle…

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      Probably a good idea.

      Why would anyone want to use this opportunity to rebuild the sales base and increase the chances of returning to profitability…

      But hey…at least GM doesn’t have pedal issues…or airbags that magically go off when you start your truck…

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      Pot meet kettle is right!!!!!

      How can a company that sells/sold re badged Toyotas throw stones? How about that (Toyota) Pontiac Vibe? Does GM not have a clue as to what they sell?

      GM still claims the piston slap in my 2004 GMC isn’t a problem.

  • avatar

    Sorry mhadi, TTAC commentators are expected to have more class than the Autoblog trolling rabble. Simply saying “GM and Chrysler has [sic] been producing unsafe vehicles for years” and “Toyotas will always make better cars than the crap that comes out of GM/ Chrysler and Ford” is below you and below the standards of this site.

    Circumstances change. Companies change hands and stockholders, improve quality, learn and mature. Ford is not the same under Mulally as it was under Bill Ford, Toyota under Watanabe was not the same as it is under Toyoda, and I am sure Toyoda may very well fix this company.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    This just makes these guys look classless. I don’t associate with people/companies that prey on the misfortune of others… and in such a jovial manner. Thanks for letting me know that I have no reason to look at GMs when it is time to buy my utility/offroad/winter vehicle.

    Though, the commercials featuring that tool Howie Long already had me shying away from them.

  • avatar
    pgcooldad

    Strike while the iron is hot!

    Toyota’s way with Tatemae are done.

  • avatar
    areaman

    The best thing Hyundai and friends can do right now is just quietly hum along and avoid this whole mess.

    As far as I can recall, Toyota never trumpeted their purported quality via direct attacks on any GM product, and GM isn’t doing anything for their public sympathy deficit by doing exactly the opposite.

    That said, Toyota should just ramp up their PR spin on sticking accelerators. “If you thought our cars were boring, think again…”(Hello, the Onion? You getting this?)

    • 0 avatar
      asdfghjkl

      “Toyota never trumpeted their purported quality” because they did not have to, they had Consumer Reports do it. I remember when Toyota vehicles entered the US and back then, they were making real junk cars, but Consumer Reports always raved over them. Give Toyota’s success much to them. I know many people who use Consumer Reports magazine to make their decision on their car buying. It’s sad. Maybe, one day when GM makes much much better cars then Toyota, they will give GM a little more credit.

    • 0 avatar
      chuck3344

      Goodness, in what reality are the things asdfjhjkl says true? Or is he just a paid shill?

      Toyota’s known history of (decades of quality) are a lie but GM’s well-documented flaws and total disregard for customers is all a scam perpetuated by Consumer reports?

      God, I bet this guy still thinks we’re going to find WMD’s in Iraq, too.

  • avatar
    Runfromcheney

    Although your point is clear, I think I would like to modify it a little bit, as most of the challenges facing Ford and Mulally today is that they are still trying to clean up the huge mess that Alexander Trotman and Jacques Nasser left. But your point remains: It would be idiotic to accuse Ford of being a careless, irresponsible corporation because they are an entirely different company today than they were 10-15 years ago, when Trotman and Nasser were pawning off cheaply-engineered cars while their market share tanked.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    There’s only one company that will benefit significantly from Toyota’s misfortune, and unfortunately, if you’re a domestic fan, employee or executive, that company is Honda.

    Given that, I truly wonder if it’s worth GM’s time to look this petty and opportunistic. Mind you, this is the same company that’s so detached from what the market wants and expects that their strategy for identifying that gap is to blame their customer’s ignorance. Marketing is not their strong point.

  • avatar
    Loser

    Karma can be a bitch.

    GM Stops Pontiac Vibe Sales As Part Of Toyota Recall

    http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/djf500/201001271337DOWJONESDJONLINE000595_FORTUNE5.htm

    • 0 avatar
      Roundel

      Aw shucks, they will just have to wait to sell the remaining 6 new vibes…. that will put a dent in January sales.

    • 0 avatar
      pgcooldad

      According to the story – two dozen sales halted = 24

      I hope they find them all.

      General Motors Co. has halted sales of about two dozen Pontiac Vibe cars as part of Toyota Motor Co.’s (TM, 7203.TO) recall of 2.3 million U.S. vehicles.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Another interesting, ah, point is that vehicles formerly made at NUMMI are likely going to shift to Cambridge, Ontario and San Antonio, Texas, not from Japan.

  • avatar
    NickR

    I think that Calvin and Hobbes image is infringing on a copyright.

  • avatar
    unleashed

    Huyndai along with Honda, not GM are in a great position to take advantage of Toyota’s troubles.

  • avatar
    Omoikane

    330 million Americans and Canadians were forcibility made owners of GM and Chrysler.
    Before engaging any dialog with UAW/Government Motors scum,
    I would respectfully ask they remove their long, grubby hands from my pockets…

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      You were not “forced” to do anything. Our democraticly elected governments make decisions. BTW who asked you to engage in any dialog?

    • 0 avatar
      reclusive_in_nature

      When your democraticly elected government does the exact opposite of what the majority elected them to do, and their decisions can only be enforced by men with guns it’s safe to say you were forced. As for who asked Omoikane to engage in dialogue, I’ll tell you: TTAC did. Contrary to what you may want, TTAC allows posters to post just about anything they want (so long as they adhere to a few simple courtesies). You should be grateful dialogue isn’t an ‘invitation only’ affair. If the basic rules about flaming were any standard for being allowed to post I don’t think you’d get an invite…

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      “UAW government motors scum”. I would call that flaming.

      I stand by my post. Governing by the polls doesn’t work. Thats why we have elections.

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Kluttz

      That’s not flaming; it’s the truth! A car company that blames ME for not perceiving their cars as quality is scum to me, too. Like I said, though, I’m still very glad I drive a Honda.

      Yes, my first 7 cars were GM, the last one a NEW 1982 Trans Am, which was all the incentive I needed to purchase my first Toyota (A 1985 Corlla GT-S Twin-Cam 16, and bright red) and never look back. And I never have. Since then it has been Toyota, Nissan (’91 Sentra SE-R, a kick-ass piece of machinery), Nissan, Toyota (’95 Corolla, very utilitarian and very dependable), Nissan, Nissan, Honda, Honda. Only one Nissan EVER gave me a little trouble.

      Who’s the scum?

  • avatar
    The Walking Eye

    I was thinking maybe they should make a commercial that ended with something like “At GM, we design with your safety in mind…unlike some of our competitors.”

    Now that would be classless.

    O/T: Can we please clean up the comments around here, especially the wingnut ideology stuff?

  • avatar
    Negativist

    Nice try, Government Motors. Anyone want to bet which company will still be around in two years?

    (Hint: the one that didn’t beg the government for US taxpayer dollars to save its worthless corporate ass, since not enough customers were willing to give their money over freely in exchange for its shoddy products.)

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    I live in Fremont, CA, and don’t understand why Toyota gets all the bad press for closing NUMMI when they should only get half.

    And while I’m not a Toyota fan, you just have to look at the IIHS driver death rates to see how safe Toyotas are relative to most of the competition (luxury brands excepted). It was a while since I checked because the last set of data came out in 2006 or 2007, but I remember the Rav4 and 4Runner having ridiculously low death rates compared to the competition.

    (Yes, the IIHS did try to apply some normalization factor to reduce demographic effects, and they acknowledge that they couldn’t eliminate them entirely.)

  • avatar

    The main beneficiary of this current Toyota crisis will probably be Nissan, Hyundai and even Volkswagen. For most current Toyota owners GM cars are not even a consideration. Can you imagine a Toyota owner sitting inside Cobalt for the first time? They would think they were back in 1985 in terms of interior quality.
    Even the Cruze looks to be a potential flop when you see the lukewarm reviews it is getting in Europe. Just because Toyota is going through a rough time does not mean people will be tempted to buy mediocre GM cars instead.

    What a disgrace!

    • 0 avatar
      Roundel

      To say that current Toyota products have a “better” quality interior than a GM car shows that you don’t get out much. Toyota has become the epitome of playskool Plastic Fantastic stuff.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Oh… I wouldn’t get to steamed about any advantage GM might be able to gain over Toyota. I’m sure they’ll find some way to screw it all up.

  • avatar
    MadHungarian

    Is a $1000 incentive going to do it? I would think that current owners of Toyotas affected by the recall are in a much worse pickle than that. What dealer wants to take in a trade that they basically can’t resell?

  • avatar
    John Horner

    “2) GM pulled out of NUMMI, leaving Toyota with little choice but to pull out.”

    That part isn’t accurate. The vast majority of NUMMI’s production output has been Tacomas and Corollas for many years. The lone GM product made there, the Pontiac Vibe, was almost a nuisance given its low sales numbers. Toyota didn’t have to close NUMMI, they chose to.

    • 0 avatar
      asdfghjkl

      Most people didn’t buy the Vibe over the Matrix because the Vibe bore the GM nameplate. But, in fact both vehicle are the same and built by the same workers on same assembly line. Some even rated the Matrix better than the Vibe. It just to show the bias against GM. GM today has come to the conclusion it can not gain new customer just by building their vehicles better, they have to go after high technologies that no one has. And, guess what? They can do it now that they have shed all those legacy costs that were dragging them down. And believe me, they will do it! I know they have expertise that Toyota can only dream of.

  • avatar
    carguy64

    If it wasn’t for Toyota and Honda, we’d all be driving somthing equilvent to an eastren bloc cars, Ford, learned it’s lessons in the safety dept thanks to Volvo and styling thanks to Jaguar and thriftiness with the Mazda group, Chrysler had to learn form their mistakes as well, but learn to change with Damilier and turned out nice products of their own, GM, they had to resort to Europe and Austraila to save their butts and had gotten so bad they decided to dump the small “GM” square badge off all of their cars…Seriously GM, you are the same good’ol boys club…not much has changed, Oh I guess it has.. Minus…. pontiac, Saab, Olds, Saturn…. Nissans arn’t much better either considering the self destructing 2.5 Q engine in their 2002-2006 Altimas.

  • avatar
    npbheights

    All this has proven is that Toyota is willing to pull off drastic and dramatic measures to fix safety issues with their cars. Halting sales of new and used models at their dealerships until they get the fix right and cars on the road taken care of before putting the parts in new cars seems pretty responsible. Did Ford stop production and sales of the Pinto due to safety issues? Come hell (literally) or high water (when the fire truck arrived) they hussled those things out the door as quickly as they could. That’s ancient history, I know, so I will compare my experience for all of you.

    I like cars. American Cars, German Cars, Japanese Cars. I have had many from makers that hale from all three places. And nobody has stood behind their product like Toyota has at this time. I have a 2009 Corolla. Yes, it is supremely boring, decontented- you bet. Soft touch plastics? Not here. And not as nice as the ’89 Camry I had. But I have not experienced any of the throttle problems reported in 30,000 miles and if I did, it’s maker is standing firmly behind it to make it right.

    I did have a Northstar powered Cadillac. For fun, search “Northstar Problems”. Severe oil leaks, Yea, I had that problem – head gasket leak, yea, that too. Did GM help? No. Did they stop production of them until they fixed the problems of the ones already on the road? No. Do mechanics even want to attempt to fix these things? No. Its a $10,000 throwaway engine. Did they make them in 1993? Yes. Do they make them in 2010? Yes.

    Search – Silverado Intermediate Steering Shaft Clunk. Yea, I have that problem too. GM helpful at all? No. Read the stories of all the happy customers. Its a Silverado, the steering clucks – its normal. And the engines clack “cause we make the engines looser now so that they last longer” – quote from the service manager. Real Nice. Stop production to make it right? No.

    Search simply “Dexcool” (lawsuit pops up as you type it, lol) and click “images” There are many pictures and stories, except the one about GM voluntary making it right for all customers affected.

    BMW? Don’t even get me started on that service disaster.
    B reak M y W allet

  • avatar
    meefer

    Yeah, for shame Toyota, selling more cars to people with free will to choose any model during C4C! How dare you!

    While on some level I agree that it’s business and you have to be cutthroat, at least be good at spinning your version of the truth. Sheesh. Then again it is the UAW, which probably has been operating in a virtual reality simulation for quite some time now.

  • avatar
    Roundel

    On a side note… when is toyota going to call a spade a spade. More “floormate recalls” are being added to “sticky gas pedals” This is about the throttle or ECU, not pedals. Why are they skirting what it actually is. Now poeple have an inordinate fear of rubber floormats for no reason.

  • avatar
    bwell

    So a union/government owned corporation is offering financial incentives (from resources provided by the taxpayers) to potential customers. These incentives are offered with the express purpose of harming the largest non-union, non-government-owned corporation in the same industry.

    And I should think: “Hey, this is just business, right?”

    Hardly.

  • avatar
    geeber

    I doubt that people spooked by Toyota are going be lured by cash incentives for GM vehicle. The chief beneficiaries will be Honda, Hyundai, Subaru, Nissan and maybe Ford.

    One drive in my mother-in-law’s 2004 Malibu is enough to convince me that GM still doesn’t get. That car with 54,000 miles on the odometer feels older and has more things wrong with it (including the clunky steering shaft) than my 2003 Accord with 126,000 miles on the odometer.

    As for the new Malibu being different – we’ve heard that same old song for the past 30+ years.

    • 0 avatar
      asdfghjkl

      You picked to compare an old 2004 Malibu when they were not so good. In case you don’t know, with time things can change. Just like when Hyundai made junk not too long ago, but today they are much different. You should compare a 2008 Malibu with a 2008 or better Honda, Accord or Camry. The 2008 Honda Accord was completely redone in 2008 along with the 2008 Honda Accord. Guess which one won the North American Car of The Year? The Malibu with hands down. Better gas mileage and better everything and today it is still the same case. Most on this post will list example of how GM used to be but, today, it is a much different GM. They started major changes about 3 years ago before the bankruptcy. The new great GM vehicles didn’t just come from overnight.
      Test drive them and compare them. I have.
      I’ve been an auto enthusiast all my life and hate to see GM and Ford getting a bum rap for their new automobiles when I know, today their cars are just as good if not better.

  • avatar

    We shouldn’t have thrown money at Toyota owners, better to have increased telling our quality and MPG story. It’s too bad distress has become a way of life at GM. A chance for profitability is wasted as we once again promote our products by giving them away. Plus, it’s just not the American way to kick someone when they’re down. As this story unfolds and the human toll is revealed in loss of life and injury, we come across as opportunists as opposed to the company who builds better cars.

    For all the improvements at GM, the incompetency continues in sales and marketing. Call it the LaNeve Legacy. Misguided with absolutely zero sales experience, these individuals continually thwart the best efforts of our engineers, stylists, and production people. Whitacre says there will be accountability and I believe it, just hope it doesn’t take him to much longer to see where the real trouble at GM has been, and still is to this very day!

  • avatar
    late_apex

    It’s an interesting tact to resolve the perception gap. Make the other guy look bad and it makes you look good by comparison.

    Of course if the public doesn’t believe you it just makes you look like you’re throwing dirt in a desperate attempt to make yourself look better.

    Toyota isn’t un-touchable. Toyota makes mistakes. Toyota can have quality issues. Statistically speaking, Toyota’s are more reliable and hold a higher resale than domestic products according to Consumer Reports and ebay. It doesn’t mean they are all safe nor does it mean that all GM products are unsafe.

    Cars aside, it’s a crappy marketing ploy that expands the gap in my mind by using negative marketing. Tell me why you’re better and don’t worry about convincing me who I think is the best. That’s a decision each consumer makes for themselves.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Ha Toyota has been playing dirty for many a year it’s jut that they know how to buffalo the public with good PR stunt moves. On the other side of the coin GM should be just doing there thing and advertising there mileage and features advantage and get there products out there. Improving there quality would also be a step in the right direction.

  • avatar
    Steven02

    I think that many people would be saying that if GM didn’t do this, they would be missing out on an opportunity to get potential clients. If you like the move or not, it is a good move for them.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    Seems like no one ever mentions the billions of dollars in incentives our government gave to the japanese and german car companies when they built plants in the south. And you can be sure that they got big tax breaks from our government. Maybe if our government did some of these things for the domestic automakers in the past they might not have been so inclined to move plants to Mexico?
    Does anyone think that the japanese automakers care about us? Just a year or so ago an employee died at one of the toyota plants in japan from overehaustion from working long hours.
    The newspaper article stated that in japan Toyota workers are reguired to work long hours without overtime pay “because it’s job security.”
    If Toyota could get away with it over here you can be sure they would do it, if they don’t even care about their own people.

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