By on September 22, 2009

Oh noes! (courtesy i.ehow.com)

For those of you unfamiliar with the secret language of telephone-based customer service representatives, RTFM means “Read the F-ing Manual.” Only now, for Chrysler, it’s PTF-DVD: “Play the F-ing DVD.” Automotive News [sub] reports that “Chrysler Group is replacing its traditional owner’s manuals with DVDs and an abridged printed guide in an effort to reduce costs and save 930 tons of paper annually.” Wow! Can you imagine how much better off the planet would be if Chrysler stopped making cars? Just kidding. As for costs, well, taxpayers have sunk over $10 billion in this bad bad boy, so every penny ChryCo doesn’t spend on paper manuals goes to their “Save the Sebrings!” campaign. Uh, how many pennies is that, anyway? “Spokesman Bryan Zvibleman . . . declined to say how much will be saved by the change, which is taking effect with 2010 models.” Declined? As in refused? I like “demurred,” but then I like my euphemisms shaken, not stirred.

Is this a big deal? It sure was to Chrysler (the artist formerly known as “under private equity ownership, we can move much faster than our competition”)  . . .

Chrysler had been considering the change for more than a year, said Al Motta, head of service operations. The automaker conducted a consumer study, solicited input through an online forum and held four focus sessions in Chicago to help determine what information to include in the printed version.

Finally, Chrysler mailed 500 sample DVDs and printed guides to customers who had bought 2009 Wranglers and sought feedback. The reaction was mostly positive, Motta said, especially to features such as the soft-top video tutorials.

Is that an inside joke? Or an outside joke? More importantly, could you live without a full owner’s manual in your car? Me, no. I want to have the full guide to everything to do with the car in the glovebox, in paper form, ready to go. But then, I’m paranoid. And the world’s out to get me.

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63 Comments on “Ask the Best and Brightest: Do You Need a Full Paper Owners’ Manual?...”


  • avatar
    TheFredMan

    Works for me…I don’t think I have had to consult the manual since having to learn how to program the garage door opener button 10 years ago. This leaves more space for useful crap.

    By the way, the news story I heard on this stated that any buyer who still wanted the regular book version could get a copy…

  • avatar
    fincar1

    My 2003 Silverado has an owner’s manual more than an inch thick, but I still have to ask at the dealer how to do some of the instrument panel settings, because the OM assumes that my truck has the optional bells and whistles, and it doesn’t.

    I’m glad I have it though; when a rear tire blew I used it to find the jack and decipher the spare-tire-lowering mechanism. Things had changed a bit since the 1976 pickup I had.

  • avatar
    raast

    So while at the arena at 11:30 on a minus 20 degree night, and I need to know (at a glance) which blown fuse controls whatever, I’ll just power up my laptop and scroll through the pdf owner’s manual.
    Genius.
    Why’s Chrysler in the situation it’s in again?

  • avatar
    brndn81

    I don’t see any problem with it. Chrysler’s website lets you can download the manual free of charge, so those who feel the need could always just print a copy themselves.

  • avatar
    PickupMan

    Meh…
    My brand new Samsung TV came with a manual on thumb-drive.

    I don’t need 8 pages of info on how to save radio presets. The good stuff is in a TSB or shop manual, not the user manual that gathers dust in the glove box.

  • avatar
    TheFredMan

    raast :

    So while at the arena at 11:30 on a minus 20 degree night, and I need to know (at a glance) which blown fuse controls whatever, I’ll just power up my laptop and scroll through the pdf owner’s manual.
    Genius.
    Why’s Chrysler in the situation it’s in again?

    FYI – Typically, the back cover of the fuse box has a diagram of which fuse controls what function….no need for the manual.

  • avatar
    86er

    Things had changed a bit since the 1976 pickup I had.

    I know, back then you could actually jack up the vehicle off the bumper. On a truck, what a concept!

  • avatar
    jmo

    So while at the arena at 11:30 on a minus 20 degree night, and I need to know (at a glance) which blown fuse controls whatever, I’ll just power up my laptop and scroll through the pdf owner’s manual.

    Going forward an iPhone/blackberry app and access via URL from a smartphone should do the trick. No reason the manual shouldn’t be available at http://www.dodge.com/manual/dakota/2007

  • avatar

    Not that the printed material is correct most of the time anyway. Speaking on the documents for my Government-Motors CTS, the full-printed manual and the quick start guide have a few inconsistencies (and wrong/incorrect information) on how to do certain things. Duh.

    But, I’d rather have the printed than the DVD, I can go through the former at my own pace as opposed to slow, tortuous DVD instructional videos.

  • avatar

    I looked at the owner’s manual of my ’07 Accord just a few weeks ago, to find out how the heck to change one of the headlight bulbs.

    I want it in print, and not at the hand of my own printer which will be way too large.

  • avatar
    86er

    Wow! Can you imagine how much better off the planet would be if Chrysler stopped making cars? Just kidding.

    Don’t tell that to Canadians.

  • avatar
    raast

    TheFredMan :

    Yes some do. And just how many fuse locations will you need to examine exactly?

    The bottom line for Chrysler IS the bottom line – and maximizing profit is job one. Given the history of their past performance, current situation and corporate mindset, I’ll figure in terms of “how much could be saved” on a decal or engraving for the cover, times x many cars over the production run. Pretty sure I know what I’ll get.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    I think to not print the owner’s manual is an error in judgment on Chrysler’s part. I’m surprised their legal department allowed it. With a DVD, third party equipment is required.

    Say someone puts in the wrong tranny fluid, damage is done, and a court claim is filed. To say it was in the lovely HD-DVD won’t fly in front of judge and jury. Before, if someone used the wrong ATF, Chrysler could say “But we put it in the manual so that wouldn’t happen”. Now the onus is on them instead of the customer

    In a liability case it strengthens the plaintiff’s cause, probably guaranteeing Chrysler to found liable. If none of their competitors are doing, there may be a good legal reason. Laws aren’t recorded on paper just cause of tradition.

  • avatar
    Cicero

    The “mostly positive” feedback on the Chrysler DVD has convinced GM to expedite its plan to put its owners manuals on 8-track tapes.

  • avatar
    discoholic

    Volkswagens come with a nice leather-clad ring binder that fits neatly into its own specific slot in the glove compartment. Not one Volkswagen owner will ever see all parts of the manual (which, by the way, is the absolute best in the business in terms of structure and readability). However, what it does manage is give owners the nice warm feeling that they have purchased a premium vehicle from a manufacturer that spares no expenses when the customers are concerned.

    Imagine you’re a Chrysler owner whose rear left tire is now in a million bits all over the interstate and who needs to know how to operate a jack (well, find the damn thing first of all) and put on the spare. Guess what signals a silver 23-cent DVD in a clear-plastic sleeve will send to you at precisely that moment.

    Do feel free to also guess how often you will ever purchase a Chrysler again in the future.

  • avatar
    LennyZ

    Lots of documentation is now presented in PDFs. I would prefer most of the manual to be available online in PDF form. Maybe emergency information like changing a flat could be included in paper form but I prefer the electronic format. Needed pages can be printed and dumped into the glove box. Most people I know rarely read the owners manual anyway. Paper manuals are a waste. They take up space and when you eventually need them they are often is bad shape. Go online for the info.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    I downloaded the owner’s manual for our cars. It’s easier to do a computer search for specific content, print the page, and take it to the store for a replacement light bulb, or whatever.

    The hard copy is in the trunk for reference if I have a problem on the road. It doesn’t occur often, but then the manual is irreplaceable. Unless Chrysler has a satisfactory way around that it will confirm they don’t give a damn about the shrinking number of people who still buy their cars. Boy, would that be a surprise!

  • avatar
    brndn81

    Unless Chrysler has a satisfactory way around that it will confirm they don’t give a damn about the shrinking number of people who still buy their cars. Boy, would that be a surprise!

    “An accompanying printed user guide summarizes common features such as heating, cooling, seat adjustments and audio controls in 80 pages or less, and also highlights safety and emergency information for immediate assistance to change a tire or activate the warning lights.”

    http://www.detnews.com/article/20090922/AUTO01/909220326/1148/Chrysler-to-put-manuals-on-DVD

    There you go.

  • avatar
    Mike66Chryslers

    I seem to be in the minority here, but I think this is an excellent idea. Manufacturers of computers and other electronic devices have been doing this for some time now. You get a printed “quick start guide” that’s all you need to get up and running, and the nitty-gritty details are on an included CD/DVD.

    I shake my head in disbelief when I see how thick new car owners manuals are getting, and when you open them you have to wade through all the legal mumbo-jumbo to find what you want. There’s got to be a way to pare that down to the topics that people a)look for most often in their manuals, and b)are likely to look for when they’re away from home (and their PC), such as jack instructions.

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    I think that the DVD makes sense for a lot of owners who will never crack the cover of an owner’s manual, regardless of what happens. Many just call AAA if something doesn’t work, and younger people are so used to online info that hard copy materials are about as interesting to them as B&W movies. I think that a very short tips booklet of high priority info (fuses, tire changing, electronics operation) would still be a good idea. If I got only a DVD, I would probably print my own such booklet like that from the DVD (assuming it had PDFs as well as videos).

    I compare this (and most manuals I’ve ever gotten) to the manual that came with my first car, a used ’65 VW Beetle. It actually had step by step instructions, including photos involving 2 white lab-coated technicians, of how to do virtually any maintenance action required, even up to removing the engine. Almost everything that I ever learned about how cars really work I learned from that car/manual. I was truly amazed that VW thought owners wanted this info enough to publish it that way.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Save the Sebrings? I thought it was save the CEO’s.

  • avatar
    windswords

    discoholic:

    “Imagine you’re a Chrysler owner whose rear left tire is now in a million bits all over the interstate and who needs to know how to operate a jack (well, find the damn thing first of all) and put on the spare. Guess what signals a silver 23-cent DVD in a clear-plastic sleeve will send to you at precisely that moment.”

    The most common specs (fluid capacities, bulbs, jumping instructions, tire changing, etc.) will be provided on a 60-80 page booklet. It’s ok, you can go back to your leather bound Beetle book.

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    I am amazed at how thick owners manuals have become. I used to read owners manuals of 60s cars, and they seemed to be pamphlets of about 30 pages or so. Now, Geeez! If only they could get rid of the “never stand on your head on the roof of a vehicle when it is moving in proximity to high tension wires or carwashes” kind of warnings, we could be back down to 50 pages. Bah Humbug. Damn kids on my lawn again.

    All that said, however, I am still more of a paper guy than a DVD guy. I can flip thru the stupid warnings and read the relevant stuff faster than I can watch a DVD, is my guess. Maybe if they thrown in some microwave popcorn and produce it in 3D.

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    Since I don’t have a computer in my vehicle with which to view the DVD owner’s manual, I want it in print, in the glovebox, for immediate perusal if I need it. I don’t consult my manual often, but I have found the need to do so when away from home, and it would piss me off to no end if I couldn’t look something up when on the road.

  • avatar
    Emro

    I don’t need a paper copy… would prefer it in electronic form anyway, then it has a ‘find’ function…

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    How about we go a few steps further? If you save all this money and effort on printed manuals, how about putting some of the back into the documentation and service process.

    For example:
    * Put your full shop manuals on-line in PDF format and make them free to download
    * Have TSBs that have been vetted by technical writers and not engineering co-op students.
    * Allow service work to be tracked centrally so that I don’t have to keep reams of receipts to prove I’ve kept up with my oil changes, or hunt-and-peck for a used car’s service history.
    * Don’t bury features eight menu levels deep in the telematics system. Again, hire actual UI/HID designers, don’t give this job to an engineer.

    I’m all for this, but a DVD isn’t a good way to do this, not in an era when the same information could be made available on-line and kept up-to-date.

  • avatar

    Owners manuals have grown over the years.
    Here are some examples I have in my office.

    1960 Renault Dauphine – 8.25″ x 5.25″, 65 pages
    1962 Studebaker Hawk – 8.25″ x 5.25″, 32 pages
    1967 Ford Thunderbird – 8.5″ x 4″, 64 pages
    1979 Plymouth Horizon – 8.5″ x 4.5″, 80 pages
    2006 Volkswagen Jetta – 5.5″ x 8.25″, 412 pages

    The Jetta owners manual is bigger than the phone books in some of the towns I’ve lived in. It is full of useful info and everything is well organized and easy to find. I really like this manual and wouldn’t want to trade it for a DVD or downloadable PDF file.

  • avatar
    carguy

    A DVD based manual isn’t much use when I’m in the car. Maybe if they also supplied a laptop?

  • avatar
    GinD

    Just last week, I had to dig out the owner’s manual in a rental car.

    I rented a Subaru Impreza, and first of all could not figure out how to turn OFF the heated seats. I drove out of the rental lot with the air conditioning on and a furnace at my back. I pulled over and started examining the dash board and surrounding area for some kind of useful button. I finally looked in the glove box for the manual. The button was at the back of the center console, with a completely uninformative icon. Success! No more furnace at my back.

    On the last day I went to get gas, and could NOT figure out how to open the gas door. Finally again went to the manual, and discovered the lever partially under the seat. (Now you may think this is funny, but I normally drive a 99 Tacoma and therefore have not encountered such new-fangled devices…)

    If the manual had conveniently been on DVD I would have been screwed.

    My point is that when you actually need to RTFM, are you likely to have a convenient DVD player?

  • avatar
    Darth Lefty

    The only time you ever need the manual is when the car isn’t working. This only happens when you are in your car, not in front of a computer. So, yes.

  • avatar
    brndn81

    GinD:
    You would have been fine, as there is still a partial paper manual being provided that covers the issues you describe.

    While Farago did not directly mention this in his writeup, he does ask whether you could live without a “full owners manual”.
    Guess we were supposed to ascertain that a partial one was being provided on our own. Or not.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    As long as all the stuff you may need when you are on the road is in the abbreviated manual it will be okay. You still need tire pressure, how to change bulbs, jack points, types of fluids to use, etc. I don’t know what they put in current owners manual’s but the one’s I’ve had for my cars have been relatively small, fit in the glovebox and only included that sort of info. If they expect a person to find a dvd player when they need to change a headlight bulb or find the tire jack, well, good luck with that…

  • avatar
    brndn81

    Just noticed the article does mention the abridged manual. Reading for comprehension isn’t my thing today. Apologies to Mr. Farago.

  • avatar
    georgie

    Personally I’ll take a full printed owners manual any day. I feel they are useful to acquaint a new owner with features of his vehicle. Most importantly if the vehicle is the owners first experience with this make.
    My Lexus came with a nice leather folder embossed with the Lexus logo and contained the owners manual and the warranty and maintenance manuals.
    This is my first experience with a Lexus so I am glad I have the manual to refer to.

  • avatar
    geggamoya

    Does it come with a portable DVD-player with included paper manual for the player?

    As it is with the paper manuals i still have to deal with customers asking how they open the fuel filler cap or how to unfasten the spare tire.

    Granted, the manuals on some cars do basically say “remove broken tire, replace with new one” and not much else. As for oils, they say “use manufacturer certified oil only, available at the dealer” or similar. Much good that does when you need oil at Joe’s Random Gas Station in Asskrakistan. And then you proceed to pour a liter of oil into the car without checking the level first, because the oil-light was on.

    If the DVD contains extra information not available int he paper version usually found in cars, then im all for it.

    The manual on my car says that to change the bulbs, you have to open protective hatch, change bulb, close hatch. Only probelm is that i have to remove the battery to open the hatch on one side. Took the dealer 1,5 hours to change the bulbs after i broke the hatch and had bloody knuckles.

    So i guess my point really is that manuals are mostly uselesss anyway. And even if cars came with a huge manual, people still wont look in it, they will just call road service and complain abou how their car is crap because it stalled after they put the wrong fuel in it. Or how the steering felt wobbly for a week and then went really bad, and the tow-truck driver arriving at the scene discovers that the car has a wheel missing.

    Pointless really, just skip the manual altogether and replace it with a bottle of scotch.

  • avatar
    Tummy

    Put the manual on the Nav computer screen. Make an iPhone App with an easy to use find, page flip, and instructional videos. Have a version that people can download as a PDF and view videos online.

    Keep an emergency abridged version in the car, as they are doing.

    Maybe they are putting it on DVD (I’m assuming DVD video) since Chrysler owners can’t, won’t or don’t read the printed versions anyways.

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    would prefer it in electronic form anyway, then it has a ‘find’ function…

    The paper manual has a “find” function, it’s called the appendix.

  • avatar
    obbop

    I take my “bathroom reading material” where I can find it and the glove box is where some of it originates.

    Found under the gloves. In the box.

  • avatar
    hdtestrider

    about 15 years ago, I rented a new GEO Metro. The owners manual said, “do not park your new GEO over burning objects” with a picture of a GEO roasting over a camp fire.

  • avatar
    Yuppie

    I have the opposite problem. Audi only has paper manuals. I would like an additional electronic version that is searchable, e.g., Adobe Acrobat, because the paper manuals are at least an inch thick and the index does not always do the job.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I think brndn81 got it right when he posted:

    “An accompanying printed user guide summarizes common features such as heating, cooling, seat adjustments and audio controls in 80 pages or less, and also highlights safety and emergency information for immediate assistance to change a tire or activate the warning lights.”

    The “manual” in my Nissan is 86 pages and covers everything you’d need at a glance. You don’t need to carry a shop manual in the car. A quick guide is essential in any car, especially a rental you’ve never driven before.

  • avatar
    BMWfan

    Great. Now you will need to purchase a DVD player so you can read the owners manual for your new car. What pea brained Ahole came up with this Idea? As others have mentioned, what do you do while on vacation, 1000 miles from home, and nowhere near a town, when some mysterious light comes on? The people that conceived this idea, and the ones that approved it should be beaten to whithin an inch of their lives. Where has rational thought gone in this country?

  • avatar
    Wheeljack

    They’re trying to do something to help save money and paper and the whining and complaining is astounding. Ya’ll did read the part where you can get a hard copy if so desired, yes?

    Edit: just because it’s a DVD doesn’t mean it needs a DVD player to run – it’s probably a really large multimedia file with embedded video content that wouldn’t fit on a CD-ROM. My guess is that it will run on any typical computer that a significant portion of the population own.

  • avatar
    BMWfan

    @Wheeljack

    Of course it will run on a laptop! Do you really want to bring a laptop everywhere you go on the off chance you will need it to read the manual? Where will you store it? A DVD player is cheaper and smaller. I actually suggested that option in jest, as it cannot read the pdf files that probably would be necessary to make an electronic manual the least bit useful. The manufacturers should just stick with what has worked for years. Use recycled paper to save costs. Some people stretch so much when buying a new car that they just do not have the money for any more extras. The least they deserve is a proper manual to go along with their new car!

  • avatar
    johnny ro

    My A4 has nice owners manual sitting in it owners manual slot in glove box.

    Give me well though out, well written paper please. And a factory service manual along with owners manual online for free.

  • avatar
    UnclePete

    I’ve been in the high-tech industry for over 30 years, and I still want a paper manual in my car. If you have to send a card in to get one, it would be the first thing I did after taking possession of the car. Having a DVD or PDF of a manual is handy, but having a paper one in the car is vital.

    If the car companies want to save money, stop sending me the flyers with the service coupons that expire in three days.

  • avatar
    Wheeljack

    @BMWfan:

    Some people stretch so much when buying a new car that they just do not have the money for any more extras. The least they deserve is a proper manual to go along with their new car!

    Where did it say there would be a charge for a conventional printed manual? My impression was that it would be free to those who desire it.

  • avatar

    If the abridged manual is said to be eighty to eighty five pages, how long was the complete manual?

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    If the abridged manual is said to be eighty to eighty five pages, how long was the complete manual?

    That’s why I’d like a PDF version. While reading thru it the 1st time, I’ll copy/paste the necessary items, highlight unique stuff, ignore the moron warnings, and have a custom manual 1/4 the size.

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    I wouldn’t mind a quick reference guide in printed form, with a pdf on a DVD – or even better, available online. Like many others here, I typically download my owner’s manual because it’s so much easier to search on a particular term, such as “clock” or “pairing” (when I need to pair a new phone with built-in Bluetooth).

  • avatar
    taxman100

    I want the paper copy. Maybe the younger generation is slow when it comes to reading, but I can find something in the owner’s manual much faster than having to use a computer or I-phone to look something up.

    It’s kind of like your credit card companies wanting you to have paperless statements. They sell it as a “green” idea, but in actuality the sole reason is to save them money. If you are smart, you keep a paper copy of every month’s statement for at least a year.

    Yet another that follows the concept that business and government want to push off on you as much of their job as possible.

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    I have the manual for my Charger in .pdf on my desktop. Downloaded it from the Dodge website when I purchased the vehicle. I find it extremely handy, I can just bring it up search right to the topic I’m looking for. I’ve never cracked open the one in the glovebox. I’ve also started doing this for the John Deere’s I use at work. Those manuals are huge and it takes about a year-and-a-half to find whatever your looking for. Deere (like Chrysler) has a nice log of manuals online and I can just put in a search term. I’m sure this would be good enough for most car owners out there. The pennies it saves aren’t really going to do Chrysler any good though.

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    @taxman100: It’s kind of like your credit card companies wanting you to have paperless statements. They sell it as a “green” idea, but in actuality the sole reason is to save them money.

    Why couldn’t it possibly be a “win-win” situation for both parties? I don’t dispute the fact that it saves companies and the government money, but it also saves me time and hassle. I receive paperless statements and save a copy of the pdf on my computer; it saves me the time of having to round up and file the dang things, and then having to shred them a couple of years later. I’d never say that this system works for everyone (some aren’t comfortable with electronic statments, and that’s cool) but for a lot of us it’s a Godsend.

    But the generational observation is spot-on. I’m a young Baby Boomer, and I’d be happy with a (non-battery) hybrid solution: A quick reference with the most frequently needed information – and no “idiot disclosures” – to keep in the glovebox, and an electronic version of the whole shebang.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    The sheer number of people responding to this bit of news in a manner only fitting of those that’d have a McEmployee fired for putting ketchup on their hamburger instead of the mustard they asked for is absoutely astounding.

    Just eat what they give you, don’t complain.

    The next one will have mustard, but it’ll also have a whole lot of spit on it, too.

  • avatar

    A DVD would work for when I do my initial pouring through the manual, but what if I need to reference something, because I’m out somewhere and there is a problem that only the manual would tell me how to fix!? For those with the entertainment system, that would work. Without? Not so much. I’d like to have the paper manual, but obviously that’s just me. I’m sure 99% of people don’t crack them open.

    Update: Okay, I went back and read an article on it and there will be a 60-80 page version of the manual in the cars for dealing with emergency issues. All is good, carry on! I say go for it. Save trees, save money. Win Win.

  • avatar
    BMWfan

    @ wheeljack

    I meant for the DVD player or computer to read the DVD. If you have to print out the manual off of a website, that involves costs for a computer, printer, paper and ink or toner. I should have been clearer.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    The paper manual has a “find” function, it’s called the appendix.

    Open PDF.
    Control-F
    Type ‘psi’
    Hit enter

    …would take me ten seconds or less if I was looking for tire pressure information. Doing the same with a paper appendix takes more time, especially since it might be filed under “Tires, Pressure” or whatever the technical writer figured would be relevant.

    Searching is always better than classification. Always.

  • avatar
    bryanska

    You think the dealer will staple their business card to the DVD sleeve, thereby scratching the owner’s manual?

  • avatar
    racenviper2

    Psarhjinian

    Open Driver’s door
    Read Tire Placard
    Tire pressure given

    Don’t need no stinken manual

    Those that rear blog’s as this will read the owners manual. You are only a small precentage of those that do. The rest of the world does not really care about the owners manual. They will ask someone else, the kid at the dealer, or log on to a forum and ask you that silly question.

  • avatar

    I am a manual reader. I have been since childhood. I want to know how things work, and find the hidden features that do stuff casual users don’t know about. This means that I am the ONLY one in my family who knows how to program our answering machine, work the Home Theater remote, and set the clothes washer for “delicate” cycle.

    That said, I have found car manuals to be increasingly useless since the mid 1980s. Why? Lawyers.

    The Owner’s Manual for my 1963 Studebaker Lark is just over 30 pages. It contains useful information, such as oil and gas capacities, fuse values and locations, and how to work the heater.

    The Owner’s Manual for my 2005 Honda Pilot is over 260 pages, most of which are filled with little triangular “lightning bolt” symbols telling me I may die if I check my tire pressure incorrectly.

    The lawyers have so choked automotive manuals with ass-covering anti-liability-speak that finding any really useful information requires a flaslight, a length of rope and a sherpa.

    I think Mopar’s got the right idea. If you want people to pay attention to you, use the TV. (And lose the lawyers.)

  • avatar
    Wheeljack

    @BMWfan:

    I get the impression from the article that they will mail you a normal bound manual at no charge if that is your preference – no home printing necessary.

    And for the record, while the interactive DVD copy is cool, I’m a car geek and would be on the phone the minute I got home from the dealership requesting my free copy of the printed manual. I’m the guy who wants all the documentation related to my expensive mechanical purchase even if it is redundant.

  • avatar
    ZekeToronto

    showbizkid wrote:

    The Owner’s Manual for my 2005 Honda Pilot is over 260 pages, most of which are filled with little triangular “lightning bolt” symbols telling me I may die if I check my tire pressure incorrectly.

    I swear two-thirds of the text in my (Audi) manual is the same. I hate that … and I’m a lawyer.

  • avatar
    racenviper2

    ZekeToronto -> THANKS!

    Only in the US were a company has to protect themself from silly litigation. The rest of the world does not seem the have the litigation problem we have here in the the US, except China. You do not want to litigate there.

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  • el scotto: @deanst Sir, we also sent oil back to our polite neighbors to the north.
  • el scotto: @DenverMike Sir, perhaps GM or Ford might -gasp- give away a few fleet vehicles. Have companies run them...
  • el scotto: Yes, we were the world’s largest oil producing country in 2020. That’s a fact. However Russia...

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