By on July 29, 2009

As General Motors prepares to ignore its own history, it also appears that the company is set on repeating it. Two decades ago, the star-crossed Fiero finally found redemption in the form of the 1988 GT V6, only to be canceled immediately after that revised car received positive reviews from consumers and the press. Yesterday, a halt was called to production of the Pontiac Solstice and Saturn Sky, just as the introduction of the GXP Coupe offered a glimmer of the decent sports car the Skystice could eventually have become. Like the man said, it’s deja vu all over again.

The original Solstice and Sky were fatally flawed cars, Playskool-esque steel-body roadsters that weighed nearly as much as their Corvette relative but were powered by less than half as much motor. The body panels creaked, the top didn’t work well at all, and the overall driving experience could best be described as “agricultural.”

Even the singular success enjoyed by the Solstice in SCCA road-racing and autocross competition turned sour in GM’s mouth. In 2007, employees from the Performance Division used questionable paperwork to campaign a “skunkworks” GXP Club Sport in the SCCA’s A Stock class, competing directly against their own legitimate customers.

The Solstice’s swan song was a “coupe” that was really more of a half-baked targa variant. As with its predecessors, it was rushed to market, inadequately engineered, and cynically marketed to a customer base that had already grown tired of broken promises from General Motors. With approximately a thousand examples produced, it’s certain to be a collector car one day, but make no mistake: In the history of modern two-seat sports cars, the Solstice is an AMC Gremlin and the Coupe is a Levi’s Edition.

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60 Comments on “Pontiac Solstice (Saturn Sky) RIP...”


  • avatar
    Matt51

    Lutz did actually provide GM with good product. G8, Solstice, Sky. I was thinking of buying a Solstice or Sky, but not much discount. GM is killing the products which could have been tweaked and saved, and pushing products (Cadillac and Buick) no one wants. GM rip.

  • avatar
    pista

    With no Pontiac, I think you’ll find there’ll be many discontinued Pontiac products.

  • avatar
    BDB

    Can someone else besides Mazda PLEASE learn how to make a $20k two-seat roadster?

    I’d really like to be able to buy one that doesn’t have a ridiculous Pokemon face like the modern-day Miata.

    Ford? Hyundai? Toyota? Anyone?

    I checked out a Solstice two weeks ago but, damn, the trunk was small. I mean small even for a roadster. You could barely fit a pizza in it with the top down. At that point you may as well get a motorcycle. Haven’t seen the coupe IRL yet, but I wanted a drop-top.

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    More like deja-voodoo all over again …

    BTW, at the time of its cancellation, the P-car (Fiero) had also been engineered for 4WS, using X-car FWD spindles … In Detroit, we say: When GM finally gets the car right, after all the customers have been disappointed (and fled), they recognize the latter, and give up on the former before any recovery can be achieved. (Like so much of what GM does, that behaviour seems pathological…)

  • avatar
    talkstoanimals

    BDB,

    Assuming VW doesn’t screw the pooch by taking on Porsche (see my hand wringing under Bertel’s “Porsche underwater” story elsewhere on this site), whatever comes of the Bluesport concept may fit the bill. I just hope they bring it to the US market. And if they do let us ‘Muricans buy it, that they alse let us choose between the 2.0T and the oil burner shown in the concept. The 1.4T used in Europe would be a nice option as well.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    the targa is beautiful. just like the roadster.

    Engine size is not an issue with me; some luggage space is. The has almost none. And ya could not even store the top on board! And, the replacement top even folded barely fit in the trunk.

    It needed to be 20% bigger, some what more clever egronomics, ya got a solid hit.

    oh well.

    GM is not forgetting the past, it’s repeating it.

  • avatar
    BDB

    talkstoanimals–

    If VW brings the final product here, and it looks close to the concept, I’ll be down at the dealer in a heartbeat to make a deposit. And I’ve never bought a VW in my life.

    I just love my older Miata and hate the looks of the new one, and need a replacement.

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    The Solstice and Sky suffered the usual GM shortcomings. From the “almost there” interior, to the lack of any kind of storage space, it was a half-baked idea that made it to showrooms prematurely. It’s sad that they put a car with such potential out there before the bugs were worked out because it was just one more example of everything GM has dome wrong over the years. That car (those cars) would have been awesome with just a little more work. Now they’ll go down in automotive history as GM’s roadsters that almost compared to the Miata.

  • avatar

    GM should have delayed this car’s introduction and taken an extra year or so to work out all the flaws. Then they should have sold it as a Chevy. Saturn is a niche brand with no history selling two-seat sports cars. Pontiac is a niche brand that had not had a two-seat sports car in almost 20 years. Chevy is a mainstream brand and could have sold a properly engineered Sky/Solstice as an entry-level sports car for those with Corvette aspirations and an Impala budget.

  • avatar
    PeregrineFalcon

    @BDB:
    “I checked out a Solstice two weeks ago but, damn, the trunk was small. I mean small even for a roadster. You could barely fit a pizza in it with the top down.”

    The joke for Solstice owners is that you can fit a 2-4 of beer in the trunk

    if you pour it in

  • avatar
    NN

    Remember, we saw this car at auto shows years before it was introduced, just like the Camaro. It takes GM about 4x as long as competing automakers to bring a product from concept to fully baked (notice I said fully baked, not production, as the Solstice exemplifies). This is a big reason they have so many problems. They release images of something early to gin up excitement (or investment), then they bumble about through development and bureaucratic hell, then they rush an unfinished product to market on a super-slow roll out apparently to “guarantee” quality. On it’s 3rd-4th year on the market, they iron out the massive wrinkles and finally have a good, yet now out of date, product, that people have been seeing images of for 8 years.

    The Volt will, sadly, suffer the same result.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    The coupe was NOT a shot at redemption, as it had all the same problems of the roadster.

    The new york times review is suitably brutal:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/05/automobiles/autoreviews/05solstice.html?ref=automobiles

    “So what sort of epitaph, if any, does the Solstice GXP coupe suggest for the once-mighty Pontiac nameplate? In many ways it is a rolling testament of G.M.’s shortsightedness: a pinch of pizazz, a dash of panache, all mixed into a package of unmet promise.”

  • avatar
    midelectric

    Hey, at least they didn’t have a habit of catching on fire. Progress!

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    Whats sadder about the solstice and sky is not that they shipped it with bugs (the top design, the interior ergonomics) that rendered it all but useless, but they never fixed the bugs in five years of production.

    The early reaction made it clear the interior was a nightmare, the top an abomination, and the storage space dreadfully nonexistant (top down) and unusable (either way).

    But they did NOTHING. A quick redesign of the top and interior for the 06 model year could have fixed things, but they didn’t.

  • avatar
    Bunter1

    Good riddance littlest Pauncho.

    Nicholas Weaver-right on, the coupe was just more of the same repackaged.

    Little Mazda can put a retratable hard top in the Miata w/o losing any trunk and it is still 300 lbs lighter than the Solstice.

    Someone above noted it should have been 20% larger.
    No, GM just sucks at packaging, see the Impala backseat, or the pudgy ‘Bus’s interior vs. the competitors. The Yuck-on get’s smacked for a cramped third row…etc.

    While the styling was good (the headlights were awful, IMO) it is like meeting a bueatiful woman who is narsasitic, lazy, bad tempered and stupid.
    After a while she really doesn’t look that good anymore-her looks start to represent a lot of nasty things (I have noted that owner satisfaction scores at CR have dived every year on the Solstice).

    Give me the cute gal that is fun to be with, smart, atheletic and isn’t selfish. Trust me on this, she will get better looking each day.
    And so will that MX-5 with the goofy grin-go ahead and buy one guys. Get over it, you will be glad you did every time you drop the top and go dancing!

  • avatar

    Just another in a long line of Bob Lutz championed, expensive, money-losing toy car failures at GM.

    It may have been a POS and wildly out of character at Pontiac (which is a muscle car brand) but it is nice to look at.

    And that’s about it.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Jack –

    The Fiero GT V-6 was actually introduced in 1985. The 1988 GT featured some suspension and styling mods that made for a better ride, but sales for the car had been dropping for several years before that.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    No, GM just sucks at packaging, see the Impala backseat…

    And what about the back seat on the Malibu, the new Lacrosse or Aura? They’re vast and well packaged. The Impala is admittedly a rotten car, based on a 20-year-old platform, but your blanket statement makes no sense.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Can anyone name me a mass-market car that’s succeeded in this segment besides the Miata? I know Toyota tried it with the MR2, and that was a bust…

  • avatar
    Bunter1

    @FreedMike-haven’t seen the new LaCrosse dimansions or sat in one.
    The Malibu’s interior is nearly identical in size to the 2nd Gen Prius. The exterior is very close to the Accords size and the ‘Bu weighs more. Haven’t compared the Aura but if it is like the ‘Bu & G6 it is on the stingy side of the class esp. on width. Yah, great packaging.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    The Solstice/Sky reminds me of another vehicle where the people on the outside got a whole lot better deal than those on the inside – the Plymouth Prowler.

    I mean, the Solstice (especially the coupe) is quite a looker (although the front end could be better). But, man, sitting in, let alone driving one, tells me that the minimal outward visibility would make it a tough daily driver.

    Not to mention the typical GM cheaping-out by not making the folding targa-top extra cost and not standard.

    And maybe if they had made the convertible top in a more conventional manner, i.e., able to be lowered/raised without having to get out of the vehicle. The ‘flying buttress’ top, although stylish, just isn’t worth that.

  • avatar

    @FreedMike: Right, but the ’88 had the flying buttresses and a rear suspension that wasn’t a Citation’s front suspension. :)

  • avatar
    mocktard

    The market for roadsters is far too small and Mazda is far too good at making them.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    it’s like as if Pontiac/GM didn’t hire any consultants to do any real work testing

    “You want to carry the top around with you in the trunk?”

    “You want to bring your shopping home?”

    these aren’t outlandish asks

    many people are willing to put up with useless cars but this is too far

  • avatar
    danms6

    The Miata’s only real competition in recent years has been the more expensive S2000, however that was recently canned during Honda’s campaign to kill off anything that people loved about the brand in the first place. It’s amazing how they got the S2000 and NSX so right the first time (or after a small refresh) but let them rot on the vine afterwards.

  • avatar
    Lokkii

    @pista :

    With no Pontiac, I think you’ll find there’ll be many discontinued Pontiac products.

    Subtle, Pista, subtle. However irrelevant to the discussion at hand.

    The point is that the Solstice was not worthy of continuing whether it was a Pontiac or not.

    Had it been a Chevy or a Buick or a GMC or a Caddy (one of the “Core Brands”) it would have been dropped anyhow. Had it been a success as a Pontiac, it would have been continued under a different badge.

    The Solstice had problems besides the top and the interior and the trunk. The rough engine and the wide ratio transmission were simply “anything available on the shelf”. Disappointing and not fun to drive.

    The real problem here is that I don’t see any indication that the new GM even dreams of handling things differently…. “new design” cars will be built from parts left over from the Solstice parts bin.

  • avatar
    pete

    I drove one as a rental (!) in LA. Not bad but unrefined and underpowered for its weight. GM should have persevered and perfected instead of giving up. This could have been the real raison d’etre for Pontiac (forget Saturn, please, really).

    It was the ONLY GM vehicle I’ve driven recently that interested me even slightly.

  • avatar
    Gary Numan

    Jack….

    Yep. The 1988 Fiero Formula and GT are absolutely the desirable ones to have and especially with the 5-speed. They did drive better and man, memories of that 2.8 MPFI wailing out from behind are still etched in.

    I’d argue these last model year V6 Fieros are really the ultimate last collectible Pontiac due to the fact that they were not shared with any other division and they did tie in with the “Excitement” branding theme.

    Anyone else vote for this car to be the zenith of pure Pontiac? And if so, how sad it occured 21 years ago!

    ….and yes, the last Fiero model year sales declined considerably from the over 100k units sold in MY84

  • avatar
    GroupB

    I bought one of these as soon as they hit the market (I know: bad idea) and while I expected some issues, this thing was worse than I can describe.

    My diff. seized in traffic, the body panels never quite lined up, the AC had a mind of its own, someone at the dealer hit something with my car (then tried to cover it up!), the parking brake handle came off in my hand, the rear decklid almost wore through the top … really, the list goes on and on.

    I eventually got the car replaced under FL Lemon Law, then got a Malibu … which I drove for 3 months. As soon as it started SQUEEELING belts in even the lightest rain, I knew the General was not for me.

    I have a VW now.

  • avatar
    Jason

    Release a crap product? Don’t address the issues for several years? Congratulations, you’re a crap company.

    I could say more, but why?

  • avatar
    LennyZ

    Maxda continually improved the Miata and so now it is the overwhelming choice for that type of car. GM introduce the Solstice/Sky and since they weren’t immediate hits dumped them. I liked those cars. I think they had great potential and could have given the Miata a run for the money. They would have never been huge sellers since the market for that type of car is not that large. So they lacked space, you don’t buy that type of car for space. In the end all of that development money was for naught. That’s not a way to run a company.

  • avatar

    When the Solstice first came out, GM fans couldn’t stop talking about how it was outselling the Miata.

    My response: let’s see where they both are in five years.

  • avatar
    akear

    It seems Lutz’s legacy cars at GM are fading away. All he has now is strange press statements.

  • avatar
    davejay

    Not too far apart a few years ago, I test-drove a Mazda6 and a Sky. The Mazda6 was meh until halfway through the freeway on-ramp while accelerating — suddenly it was fun! The Sky was meh, and stayed meh, until I ran out of gas on the freeway. Quite apropos. Sounded like a truck, too.

  • avatar
    Juniper

    Michael Karesh :
    When the Solstice first came out, GM fans couldn’t stop talking about how it was outselling the Miata.
    My response: let’s see where they both are in five years.

    Can Mazda really keep a car around that is only selling 500+ a month? Will sales recover with the economy? This stuff is all fun but at some point you have to make money at it.
    Oh, and the RX-8 is selling less than 200 a month.
    Something has to give.

  • avatar
    walksatnight

    An owner of a car like this will over look a great many faults – iffy realiability, pain in the arse top, lack of storage space, etc. However, the darn thing had better be a blast to drive….. I’ve never driven one of this vehicles but apparently they are not fun. That is the sin that can not be forgiven.

  • avatar
    JeremyR

    While it’s true that we roadster drivers are willing to put up with smaller trunks, there is a limit: Generally, there needs to be room for a weekend’s worth of stuff for two people. The only roadsters I’ve owned (Miata, TT quattro, Boxster) all fit this description.

  • avatar
    pechorin

    I like the styling on both the Solstice and the Sky…but there’s one thing that drives me nuts about them: Every one I’ve seen with its top up has hideous looking wrinkles in the “flying buttress” (rear quarter) portion of the ragtop. Maybe I’m the only one who cares–nobody else seems to mention it–but to me it just looks crappy and unfinished. I’ve always found it amazing that they put that design into production.

  • avatar
    CSJohnston

    As an actual owner of a 2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP I can tell you a few things.

    1. IT IS fun to drive. Fast off the line, good in corners. The 2.0L Turbo is a great engine. Brakes could use an upsize.

    2. Storage is small but somehow I have managed to road trip the thing across 6 provinces and 27 states… comfortably… with a passenger.

    3. It is, even with 260 hp, great on gas (700 km per tank highway averaging 120 km/h).

    4. The top. Yes you have to actually get out and put it up. A grand total of 30 seconds. BFD.

    5. People love this car. If part of the joy of owning something so unpragmatic as a 2-seat sports car is getting looks, I would wager the Solstice hammers the Miata there.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Can Mazda really keep a car around that is only selling 500+ a month?

    I wonder if Mazda would ever consider a Miata+, adding a second row of seats? There are no affordable 4-place Japanese convertibles these days. The Eclipse with it’s wide-body and minivan windsheild doesn’t count.

  • avatar
    no_slushbox

    “Two decades ago, the star-crossed Fiero finally found redemption in the form of the 1988 GT V6, only to be canceled immediately after that revised car received positive reviews from consumers and the press.”

    Four decades ago GM perfected the Corvair before killing it, starting GM down the perfect and kill road.

  • avatar
    MadHungarian

    Jack, the Gremlin was a 4 seater. You could order a base model with a rear seat delete option but not a Levis.

    Picking of nit aside, the Skystice has some seductive looking sheetmetal (from the B pillar forward; the rear of the car is very awkward), but other than that it does not meet the competition. Period. If you want a sporty convertible you do not have to settle for having essentially NO trunk space. You don’t have to settle for a Budget Rent-a-Car grade interior.

  • avatar
    Wolven

    Why is it that when the domestics finally make a car that actually generates excitement, they ALWAYS underpower, underbuild, cheapen, or in some other way F___ it up?

    It has happened so many times that I can’t even believe it’s accidental anymore.

  • avatar
    rivercat30

    I test drove one recently just to see how it compared to my S2000. It didn’t.

    But I guess when you’re GM you don’t need to make cars that anyone actually wants to buy.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Bunter1 :
    July 29th, 2009 at 4:43 pm
    @FreedMike-haven’t seen the new LaCrosse dimansions or sat in one. The Malibu’s interior is nearly identical in size to the 2nd Gen Prius. The exterior is very close to the Accords size and the ‘Bu weighs more. Yah, great packaging.

    All dimensions are for 4-cyl versions:

    Curb weight:
    Malibu 3415
    Accord 3298

    Length:
    Malibn 191.8
    Accord 194.1

    Rear legroom:
    Malibu 37.6
    Accord 37.2
    (LaCrosse 40.5)

    Rear headroom:
    Malibu 37.2
    Accord 38.5

    Trunk volume:
    Malibu 15.1
    Accord 14.0

    Overall, these two cars are VERY similar dimensionally, so I don’t see how you’d find the Malibu to be poorly packaged.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Michael Karesh :
    July 29th, 2009 at 6:00 pm

    When the Solstice first came out, GM fans couldn’t stop talking about how it was outselling the Miata.

    My response: let’s see where they both are in five years.

    Anyone have any numbes on sales for the two vehicles?

    I suspect the death of the Solstice / Sky is more due to the fact that both disivions are going away…and I don’t see another division in GM that could take the platform on. It’s too cheap for Caddy, too small for Buick, and Chevy already has a low-volume two-seater.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    rivercat30 :
    July 29th, 2009 at 10:35 pm

    I test drove one recently just to see how it compared to my S2000. It didn’t.

    But I guess when you’re GM you don’t need to make cars that anyone actually wants to buy.

    I’d wager the Solstice / Sky outsold the S2000 considerably. Let’s face it: the S2000 is a cool ride, but it didn’t exactly set the world on fire sales-wise.

    And not everyone wants a car that has to be revved to 7000 rpm to make any power…:)

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    …and there’s several hundred pages written about the Sky/Solstice that I’ll never get back.

    Really – the way the magazines were raving about this car and filling pages of how everything is roses and sunshine about it made it sound like this was the greatest product GM ever introduced.

    And now it’s a one and done model. I guess all of their crystal balls were broken that month.

  • avatar
    GS650G

    The factory which produces this car is close by me, this is probably the end of the road for the Elsmere Delaware plant. The Chrysler plant in Newark De is closing too, so automobile production in Delaware looks to be a thing of the past.

  • avatar
    niky

    Juniper :
    July 29th, 2009 at 6:13 pm

    Can Mazda really keep a car around that is only selling 500+ a month? Will sales recover with the economy? This stuff is all fun but at some point you have to make money at it.
    Oh, and the RX-8 is selling less than 200 a month.
    Something has to give.

    Unlike Pontiac, Mazda actually sells MX-5s globally… and with platform sharing with the RX8, the pain is not so great… though I wish they had pushed through with making the Kabura concept a production model… would have made a great MX3… and with a turbo 2.0, would have outperformed the RX8.

    Actually, Mazda ought to drop the RX8 already in favor of a Mazdaspeed MX-5 or an MX-5 derived coupe with the MZR…

  • avatar
    findude

    @BDB

    Can someone else besides Mazda PLEASE learn how to make a $20k two-seat roadster?

    Mazda did everything right with the Miata design and release. They made a car (small, cheap, no-frills, 2-seat roadster) that had not been available since the MGB faded away). They debuted it in simple colors and had a great and simple ad campaign that emphasized fun (the original Miata ads when it was first introduced). The avoided the troublesome rotary engine that spooked so many owners of 1970s Mazdas.) They sold fun with a Mazda nameplate. They did not sell power or handling; they let the car itself do that.

    The Miata owns this space the same way the Prius owns the hybrid space and the Suburban owned the SUV space. Sure, there are worthy competitors (like the S2000), but the Miata is the benchmark. The Solstice/Sky could have competed if it had been cheaper and/or better and capable of selling itself. It wasn’t.

  • avatar
    MrDot

    They should have built the Nomad concept.

  • avatar
    Sanman111

    Honestly, GM got it right and dropped the ball. The way to steal miata sales is through a sexier body, even if the car isn’t quite as good. However, GM made the car nowhere near as good. I recently checked out the car, the terrible seats, the poor transmission, and even the top can be forgiven for that body. However, all of those and no trunk space is enough to make me look elsewhere. Can GM sell the body deisgn to Mazda, so that they can fix it and I can buy an awesome Solstice coupe?

  • avatar
    ZoomZoom

    JeremyR :

    While it’s true that we roadster drivers are willing to put up with smaller trunks, there is a limit: Generally, there needs to be room for a weekend’s worth of stuff for two people. The only roadsters I’ve owned (Miata, TT quattro, Boxster) all fit this description.

    Agreed: My Miata, Z3, and Corvette convertible all fit those requirements, although with the Corvette I never felt comfortable driving long trips far away from repair shops. I kept the Miata as my backup car, and had to use it all too often…

  • avatar
    Dobbie

    Why copy a slow moving two seater like the Miata? Has the original poster or the majority of the responders actually driven the car they are “reviewing”? And should they actually judge both versions of the motor if they haven’t driven both?

    This little car is faster than most of the roadsters mentioned.(cost of ownership is also much less for the ones that are faster) Sports cars are for racing and driving, not storage. If the ladies need room for their purses, leather to touch, and an automatic top so they don’t break their nails… there are plenty convertable sedans out there.

  • avatar
    Jonathan Gregory

    The problem from the start was that the design assignment was to create an interesting, fun-to-drive car cobbled together on the cheap while dumpster-diving the GM parts bin.

    Newton’s First Law may be a prevailing philosophy of engineering, but Law Zero dictates that Crap In = Crap Out.

    It didn’t take Mazda three tries to get it wrong right on the Miata.

  • avatar
    Spaceman

    My wife and I always wanted a Solstice, ever since they came out especially since we both are died in the wool Pontiac people for most of our driving lives which in my case is 50 years. We have a red one just like the picture setting in our garage along with a 2006 Vibe GT and a new G3. We love them all and plan on keeping them all as long as we can get parts, well at least the Solstice! The little coupe gets driven about two or three times a month and since I work out of town or in Europe most of the time there is no problem with keeping it clean, serviceable and safely tucked away until good weather and the road calls. We hope GM will change its mine on the Pontiac brand, but times are tough for Government Motors. Maybe Chevrolet will pick it up (I read the article) as a replacement for the other sports car, we can only hope!

  • avatar
    cyberbiker

    I have an EARLY 2006 Solstice, and it is my daily driver. I remember that the reviews when it came out, comparing it to the Miata that most posting here seem to be in love with, actually called the Miata a “rattle-trap” compared to the Solstice. I agree with that assessment, and anyone who’s ever ridden in mine makes a comment on how smooth it rides and how well it handles.

    The “problems” with the top are things that I continue to see from people who heard it from their third-cousin twice-removed’s best friend that there are issues with the convertible top. These so-called “problems” are nothing but bovine scat; the top goes up & down smoothly, locks into its cradle firmly when down, and lines up with its pins perfectly every time it goes up. Yes, you can’t put it up or down without getting out of the car, but at least I don’t have all of that fabric flapping around right behind me like you do in a Miata. What’s that you say? use a tonneau in the Miata… but don’t you have to get out to put it on & take it off? I’ll be on the road before you get one side snapped down. When it’s down, the car doesn’t even look like it HAS a top. Say that about any other roadster out there.

    When you want to compare it’s power to the V-6s and V-8s out there, why don’t you compare THOSE to the Corvette? This car wasn’t marketed as a monster powerhouse, yet people like the author of this article write about it as if it were. It does, however corner as well as the others, pulling 0.87g in corners with the stock tires.

    Like what you will, but I’ll take my under-$25k fully-loaded roadster over any of the $35k-$60k roadsters that sites like this want to compare it to. I have my roadster AND an extra $10-35k over buying one of those, and I bought American, too!

  • avatar
    rivercat30

    I’d wager the Solstice / Sky outsold the S2000 considerably.

    Without a doubt and, of course, GM won’t build it because people want to buy it.

    And not everyone wants a car that has to be revved to 7000 rpm to make any power…:)

    Right again, but those would be the people who haven’t experienced the fun of revving an S2000 or the absolute ecstasy of shifting when you hit that 7K.

  • avatar

    As has been pointed out on this comment thread about the seductively beautiful but sadly (and predictably) disappointing Sky / Solstice, it’s an all-too-familiar story absolutely typical of General Motors, signature corporation of the United States of America: GM learned nothing from its failure(s). It also learned nothing from its sucesses — because it wasn’t interested in its customers. It learned nothing from the 1969 Corvair; nothing from the Cosworth Vega; nothing from the Cavalier; nothing from Yenko or Baldwin/Motion; nothing from the Quad4 (introduced with no balance shaft…). It apparently fought companies that wanted to bring back updated or updatable “crate versions” of its signature cars from the past — instead of reopening its own, shut-down plants to build them itself.

    GM was run by cowardly accountants, bloodless lawyers and blind, overpaid, self-absorbed “executives” — protected until the lake finally ran dry by its favored politicians. Its real specialty was “making the first 200,000 Americans who bought any given product it made feel like friendless fools.” Taking your GM product “back to the dealership” when it had broken-while-brand-new was always like showing up at “somebody else’s high school reunion.”

    Perhaps there’s a special corner in hell for Alfred P. Sloan and his successors. However, even hell might not allow that kind of smarmy, self-congratulatory mediocrity.

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