By on June 9, 2009

As GM stares down the barrel of bankruptcy—oh wait, they’re already bankrupt. My bad. You see, I was reading Ed Welburn’s rant on GM’s FastLane blog. Eddy’s pissed-off at Gerald Sindell’s “Open Letter to GM CEO Fritz Henderson,” which says GM’s designs reek of “Older white guys wearing suits to the office in Detroit, except for one woman and one black guy.” As the one black guy in question, Welburn’s on the warpath. Hence my confusion. I mean, with GM in C11 and all, you think the head of design would have something better to do than accuse the media of race baiting—even if it is. Which it isn’t. To steal a line from another legendary zombie, can we talk?

Here’s the quote in question, where Sindell accuses GM design team of being a bunch of (mostly) lily-white fuddy-duddies:

I went to your new website, gmreinvention.com, and perused the portraits of the top team, just to get some clues about the design sense there. I see mostly corporate-type guys, in ties and suits, and the one thing that doesn’t leap out is, “Wow — great design sense.” What leaps out is, “Older white guys wearing suits to the office in Detroit, except for one woman and one black guy.” And while we’re all looking at this new website together for clues about the new GM, does it worry any of you that the portfolio of the woman, Susan E. Doherty, is described as: “North America VP, Buick-Pontiac-GMC”? Didn’t anyone tell the web designer that Pontiac was buried several weeks ago?

After a bunch of “We at GM are artists” BS, here’s Wellburn’s indignant, poorly punctuated response:

As for quantifying my colleagues as old white men, I can only point you to my opinion , that diversity is not only represented in skin color or gender; it is diversity of thoughts, ideas, experiences and opinions of our people, that matters and makes us strong.

So, is Wellburn accusing Sindell of being a racist for believing that white people are lousy car designers? It may not be PC of me to say so, but that’s very funny. And what of the facts of the matter? Is there more than one woman and one black guy in GM’s design department? Does Doherty know she’s out of a job, or is no one brave enough to tell her?

Wellburn saves the best for last. I mean, his invitation to Sindell is PR 101 stuff. But the kicker kicks ass.

Ultimately, you and your readers will judge for yourselves. To that end, I’d like to invite you to reacquaint yourself with our award-winning cars and trucks. I would be happy to take you, Mr. Sindell, on a personal tour of GM Design Headquarters in Warren, MI. I implore you to see what we’re working on; and then let folks know what you think. In the interim, the GM design staff will do its part to ensure that design stays in the asset column.

In other words, don’t downsize me ‘bro. (I’m just tasing.)

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45 Comments on “GM Design Chief Accuses Huffington Post of Racial Prejudice...”


  • avatar
    long126mike

    Gerald who?

  • avatar
    VerbalKint

    I always knew GM’s woes were a result of a lack of “a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences” who could “reach a better conclusion than a white male…”

  • avatar
    motron

    Sindell’s objection was to “Older white guys wearing suits to the office”. GM might well benefit from input from younger white guys who are not afraid to deviate from conventional dress codes. It might well liven up their designs, while protecting the apparently sensitive white male ego.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    It’s all whitey’s fault

  • avatar
    Ken Elias

    The problem at GM isn’t diversity of race/gender but the lack of diversity of thought. Black males, hispanic females, and old white guys all fall prey to the insidious culture of GM which castrates “out of the box” thinkers.

  • avatar

    GM’s corporate bureaucracy doesn’t care about race: they’ll squish independent thought no matter who comes up with it: if your concept won’t fit on one of our global platforms, we’ll make you make it fit. And you’ll hate it.

    I’m still waiting for Wayne Cherry’s tell all book about the Pontiac Aztek. That poor (rich?), poor man.

  • avatar
    Juniper

    Hey Gerald, quit hiding behind your keyboard criticizing people who are trying to accomplish something. Go out and do something constructive for a change. If you know how.
    Do you have the balls to accept Ed’s invitation?

  • avatar
    long126mike

    Hey Gerald, quit hiding behind your keyboard criticizing people who are try to accomplish something.

    Said right here on TTAC. Irony is dead.

  • avatar
    sean10mm

    “As for quantifying my colleagues as old white men, I can only point you to my opinion , that diversity is not only represented in skin color or gender; it is diversity of thoughts, ideas, experiences and opinions of our people…”

    …Of which GM has none worthy of mention.

    “…makes us strong.”

    In Chapter 11?

    This manufactured righteous indignation is a *far* bigger howler than some blogger attributing lameness to older white guys working at GM, or whatever.

  • avatar
    sean10mm

    “Do you have the balls to accept Ed’s invitation?”

    Ed would probably invite him to test-drive the latest Aveo. Personally I’d take the waterboard behind door #2.

    “I always knew GM’s woes were a result of a lack of “a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences” who could “reach a better conclusion than a white male…” ”

    She certainly couldn’t do a worse job selecting interior plastics…

  • avatar

    From what I’ve seen, the problem wasn’t the designers’ fault (not completely, at least). It was the committees and the accountants that were more important in their corporate culture.

    The Aztec was one example of design by committee. Mob design is just like mob intelligence: an oxymoron.

    And how many times have cars been let down by having the original design nickled and dimed to the point where it’s not even recognizable? Those decisions are rarely made with significant designer input. How often has an otherwise good car been completely tainted by a cheap interior or cutting corners with the transmission or engine? Recently, they’ve shown signs that they might actually get it with their interiors(Corvette not included) and better drivetrains.

    I hope, after all this mess, GM survives. I hope it rises, like a Phoenix from the ashes, and recognizes the real changes that have to be made to not only survive until the next crisis, but to thrive. Because when it does work (Corvette, Camaro, Malibu, CTS, more and more others…), it can be really great and can make the world a better place, albeit just a little bit. (Too much?)

  • avatar

    Jesus wept.

    Harley Earl was an “old white guy in a suit”. True, it may have been a four-button salmon-colored suit, but there you go.

    Bill Mitchell was an old white guy in a suit.

    By the time he styled the Golf, Giugiaro was more or less an old white guy in a suit.

    Butzi Porsche wasn’t a kid when he styled the 911.

    This may infuriate the sh*tbags who pursue identity politics as gospel, but it you take the “old white guys in suits” out of the history of the auto industry, you’re more or less left with Ed Welburn and John Z. DeLorean.

    Oh, and Chris Bangle, whom I personally admire but I know is hated by many.

    Welburn’s right to be angry. These comments make him out to be a token, and he’s anything but a token. In fact, he’s the leading face of GM design, although as with Harley Earl, it’s his subordinates doing the work. Some of those subordinates have done excellent work. Some are white. Some wear suits, and all of them will get old.

  • avatar
    Martin Schwoerer

    Very poorly put by Sinden.

    But the fact of the matter is, usually no part of the business is more cosmopolitain than design. Most design departments are full of people from all places and backgrounds. Remember for instance Bangle at BMW or Schreyer at Kia.

    I think that GM design, in contrast, is rather parochial. Race and sex aren’t the issue: it’s just that they’re only people with little international experience.

  • avatar
    ajla

    @Jack Baruth:

    Larry Shinoda?

  • avatar
    VerbalKint

    re: sean10mm–
    :-) Judging by what’s coming out about Soto’s finances I say she was real familiar with the use of plastics!

  • avatar
    derm81

    GM is pretty big on diversity, as are all of the Detroit area’s employers…not just the car companies. Maybe due to the fact that the 313 is ground zero for tha labor movement.

  • avatar
    sean10mm

    “Welburn’s right to be angry. These comments make him out to be a token, and he’s anything but a token.”

    That’s true. Making him out to be a token is admittedly a cheap shot. It’s much fairer to say that he just sucks horribly at his job, given the quality of most GM designs. Dye his staff purple and the Cobalt will still look bad.

  • avatar

    @ajla: Good catch! I think Shinoda was a nisei, so by today’s standards he might also be an “old white guy in a suit”. Sure did some good work, though.

  • avatar
    Gerald Sindell

    Jeez, guys, just trying to be helpful and wondering out loud what it might really take for great design to be a sustainable asset for GM. And the name is Sindell, not Sinden, as often typoed above.

    For the record, I am a 65 year old white guy, and wear suits from time to time.

  • avatar
    akear

    One of the few people I respect from GM is Wellburn. It is certainly not Putz and Friz.

  • avatar
    rmwill

    More snarky Huffington Post drivel. Isn’t Ariana H the one who justifies hers and Al Gores use of bizjets to their fellow greenies on the basis of how “important” they are?

    GM’s problem is not Welburn’s team, but Wagoner/Henderson Treasurers office groupthink.

  • avatar
    JoeEgo

    sean10mm : “It’s much fairer to say that he just sucks horribly at his job, given the quality of most GM designs.”

    Blaming Welburn for the Cobalt, G8, and G6 is a little more realistic than trying to stick him with cars like the G5 and Aveo. On the one hand (Aveo) Welburn’s team was given a crappy starting point. On the other (G5) they were given a crappy budget and badge-engineering mandate.

    Most of us can agree GM’s latest design stylings weren’t so horrible as to be the primary problem. Other manufacturers’ gems sell poorly while some junk sells well. Interior qualities, overall design priorities, and lagging technologies affect GM designs across the board from swans to swines. 5+ speed transmissions, satnav, bluetooth, and advanced engine technologies have taken forever to appear on GM vehicles.

    Hood scoops on a G8 are less of an issue than a better V6. 4 speeds and a lump under the hood are a bigger problem for the Impala than the bland shape. The fact that Pontiac ever had a minivan, Aztek, Torrent, or Vibe is a bigger problem than the way they look.

  • avatar
    Raskolnikov

    sean10mm :
    June 9th, 2009 at 6:16 pm

    “Do you have the balls to accept Ed’s invitation?”

    Ed would probably invite him to test-drive the latest Aveo. Personally I’d take the waterboard behind door #2.

    “I always knew GM’s woes were a result of a lack of “a wise Latina woman with the richness of her experiences” who could “reach a better conclusion than a white male…” ”

    She certainly couldn’t do a worse job selecting interior plastics…

    After renting a RAV4 last week, I’m convinced Toyota is using the same interior suppliers as GM used to. That was the most hollow and cheapest feeling interior I’ve experienced in years.

  • avatar
    Edward Niedermeyer

    Sindell: If anything, GM overemphasizes style while the market shrugs. Take the curious case of the Malibu and Impala. GM never stops talking about the Malibu’s “competitiveness” (mostly meaning design/interior perceived quality) but the dowdy old Impala beats it every month in sales. It seems to me that design is consistently overestimated as a driver of sales.

  • avatar
    long126mike

    More snarky Huffington Post drivel. Isn’t Ariana H the one who justifies hers and Al Gores use of bizjets to their fellow greenies on the basis of how “important” they are?

    Yeah, and Al Gore sure is fat and she speaks funny.

  • avatar
    Stu Sidoti

    As I and many of my colleagues will tell you in the R&D world, Ed Welburn is one of the kindest, most gracious people you will ever meet-a true gentleman. Even in his rebuttal, he held his hand out to Mr. Sindell. Well played Ed.

  • avatar
    John Horner

    “I see mostly corporate-type guys, in ties and suits, and the one thing that doesn’t leap out is, ‘Wow — great design sense.\'”

    I think what Sinden is saying is that he was hoping to see more of the kind of people with a strong personal style that you see as hosts and principle players on HGTV design and decorating shows. You know, cool, hip, interesting, stylish and highly individual. Harley Earl certainly had a strong personal style, and he was never mistaken for one of the guys from accounting. Sinden is making a dig at The Suits more so than racial commentary.

  • avatar
    rmwill

    @John Horner

    So Car Designers have to look like folks who can show Matt Lauer how to plant annuals?

  • avatar
    agenthex

    Jesus wept.

    Harley Earl was an “old white guy in a suit”. True, it may have been a four-button salmon-colored suit, but there you go.

    Bill Mitchell was an old white guy in a suit.

    By the time he styled the Golf, Giugiaro was more or less an old white guy in a suit.

    Butzi Porsche wasn’t a kid when he styled the 911.

    You realize this is before they let colored people do important things, right?

    Also, design studios like a lot of creative agencies tend to have a lot of young talent that don’t get credit.

  • avatar

    Sindell’s dig at the suits is stupid. Look at the executives of most big companies and you’ll find everyone follows the corporate dress code. The design staff, on the other hand, dresses the way they want too, even at public events like vehicle introductions and auto shows. Wellborn, as the top GM design executive, usually wears a suit, sometimes without a tie, but the guy dresses well. His suits are perfectly tailored and look good on him. As I said, the other designers dress how they want to and, as a group, regardless of the car company they work for, have a sense of sartorial style.

    Hell, I’m put off by J. Mays’ shtick, but the head of Ford design knows how to dress.

    Like all rules, though, there are exceptions. And as a challenge to Sindell I’d present Ian Callum, now at Jaguar, formerly at Aston Martin, who has penned some of the most beautiful cars ever made. I think he’s my favorite working designer today. Callum, who is mostly bald, is little bit of a shlump and most of the time that I’ve seen him he’s been wearing a wrinkled suit jacket over a shirt with no tie. Even an image search of Callum on Google shows him dressed that way in publicity shots.

    I can understand Wellborn’s objection about race. The design staffs of the Detroit automakers are ethnically diverse. If I recall correctly, the designer who headed the exterior design team on the Cadillac CTS is Korean. The current head of Chrysler design, and designer of the 300 is Ralph Gilles, an African American. Camilo Pardo headed Ford’s “Living Legends” design team and penned the Ford GT. I’m not sure what his ethnicity is, and don’t really care enough to go beyond the initial Google search that says he’s Hispanic.

    So Sidwell has his head up his rectum. In any case, I don’t care if my barber has a nice haircut (actually, he wears a toupee), I care that he knows how to cut hair. Yes, while it’s nice that the guys Jack Baruth mentioned indeed had a sense of personal style I’m more concerned with their abilities as stylists and industrial designers.

    I’ve done a little bit of design work myself, related to my embroidery shop. My shop is usually a mess, and this time of year I’m likely to be wearing shorts, a tee, sandals and a baseball cap, but the finished products look good.

  • avatar

    You realize this is before they let colored people do important things, right?

    You do realize this is 2009, 45 years after the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, right?

    Are you saying that Harley Earl and Bill Mitchell were pretty fly for white guys, or what?

    Of course for leftists, there is no statute of limitations for any of America’s shortcomings, real, rectified, or imagined. The simple historical fact, mentioned a bunch of times here on TTAC, is that the US auto industry has a long history of minority hiring. Ford Motor Co. in particular led the way, with Henry Ford deliberately hiring many blacks. It should be noted that Ford, with all of his documented prejudices, didn’t let them stand in the way of evaluating talent. Ford’s commissions helped establish Albert Kahn’s reputation as an architectural giant.

    Oh, and Toyota sells a ton of cars and Toyota executives, at least in all the pictures I’ve seen, wear boring conventional suits. At the NAIAS or other big auto shows, if you see a stylishly dressed Japanese person, they are going to be from the media.

  • avatar
    drifter

    GM would better with “Older white guys wearing suits” than younger ones like Chris Bangle who single handledly ran a revered brand’s design language to the ground.

  • avatar
    agenthex

    You do realize this is 2009, 45 years after the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, right?

    Tell Jack Baruth, not me.

    Of course for leftists, there is no statute of limitations for any of America’s shortcomings, real, rectified, or imagined.

    So of racial inequality, which category of “real, rectified, or imagined” does it fit?

    In any case I thought the folks that became the modern day conservative believed racial inequality to have ended in 1863.

    The simple historical fact, mentioned a bunch of times here on TTAC, is that the US auto industry has a long history of minority hiring.

    Maybe the conservatives need to investigate whether it was the affirmative action that brought down detroit.

  • avatar

    drifter,

    Say what you will about the aesthetics of Bangle’s BMW designs, the company thrived while he was design director.

    Speaking of BMW, I read an article yesterday about automotive comebacks and apparently in the late 1950s the Quandt family that controls BMW was going to pull the plug on their automotive division. It was a time when the name BMW was more associated with the Isetta microcar than ultimate driving machines. Apparently they relented when company staff showed them the model they were working on, the 1500, later to morph into the 1600 and 2002. The Quandt’s decided that if their carmakers could develop such an advanced car, they really should stay in the business.

  • avatar
    long126mike

    Of course for leftists, there is no statute of limitations for any of America’s shortcomings, real, rectified, or imagined.

    Good one, coming from a party which has half its members still trying to win the Civil War, and the other half trying to wipe out FDR.

  • avatar

    # long126mike :
    June 10th, 2009 at 12:01 am

    Of course for leftists, there is no statute of limitations for any of America’s shortcomings, real, rectified, or imagined.

    Good one, coming from a party which has half its members still trying to win the Civil War, and the other half trying to wipe out FDR.

    Who said anything about a political party? I’m an independent, and never been a member of a political party in this country.

    But since you brought up the subject of political parties as Civil War deadenders, you should study some history. Lincoln was a Republican and the KKK was in part established to terrorize reconstruction era Republicans (many of them black). The Democrats were the party of Jim Crow and the Dixiecrats in the US Senate filibustered the ’64 Civil Rights Act. The Civil Rights Act passed due to support by Everett Dirksen and Senate Republicans. The 1965 Voting Rights Act was first proposed by Republican President Dwight Eisenhower. Sen. Byrd from West Virginia is a former KKK official.

    Somehow because Nixon ran on “law & order” in 1968 to appeal to southern conservatives, that’s supposed to erase over a century for active Democratic support for racism.

    BTW, while Harry Truman deservedly gets credit for integrating the US armed forces, few know that it was Woodrow Wilson, another Democratic president, who first segregated the armed forces.

    As for FDR, read Amity Shlaes “The Forgotten Man” to get a better assessment of how most of his policies prolonged, rather than shortened the depression. Also, it was under FDR that the Wagner Act established the NLRB and gave organized labor the kind of power that ultimately led to unprofitable work rules by the UAW.

    BTW, FDR was hardly enlightened about race. When he was commander in chief, blacks in the armed forces were stewards, porters, janitors and cooks.

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    They need more old, white(ish) Japanese guys in generic suits. That’s my two cents. Where’s Baracku Osmazaki when you need him?

  • avatar

    long126mike,

    PCH and the Canadian with the Armenian name (whose screenname I am to lazy right now to look up) are capable debaters.

    I wonder what they think about lefty posters like you that argue their side so inelegantly. I mean I’m sure that they’re happy for your votes, support and eager parroting of the conventional talking points, but some of the stuff you say here’s gotta make them cringe.

    Few things are as disappointing as one’s own cause being represented poorly. It’s sort of how ideological conservatives feel about many Republicans.

  • avatar
    long126mike

    Gosh, Ronnie – those insults are so elegant. Thank you so much for demonstrating to us all, with your own words, that being a good debater means trafficking in ad hominem at the expense of a rational and intelligent argument. Your transparent projection of your own shortcomings is the predictable cherry on top.

    Again, thank you.

    I’m an independent

    Yes, and so is Bill O’Reilly. We get it.

    Now could you go more completely off-topic in 10,000 more words for us?

    Lincoln was a Republican.

    He was?? Wow, and did George Washington have wooden teeth? And Byrd was in the KKK? Such a revelation and not one bit of predictable right-wing talking point trash-talk at all. You’re really building that “independent” cred there. Going for the Amity Shlaes card really boosts it, too.

    So what’s my “cause”, Ronnie? I’d really like to know. You being a free-wheeling, free-thinking “independent” and all that, you certainly know that everyone else goes in a little box, right?

    Gosh, please share more of your wisdom with us, as well as your excellent rhetorical skills.

    I’m particularly enamored with your static model of American political parties throughout history (you know, a Republican in 1865 is the same as a Republican in 2009 and same with Democrats), and the fine show of an “independent” who just happens to unleash a barrage of cliched vitriol directed solely at Democrats.

  • avatar
    windswords

    Dear Mr. Wellburn,

    To borrow a phrase from another president, “I feel your pain”. I truly do. I know what it’s like to have minorities in places of of importance in my administration only to be told by Hollywood elites and others that they are “window dressing”. My Secretary of State, National Security Advisor, and the Atorney General of my second term were all minorities. But the media wanted to focus on my VP and chief political advisor as if they – and only they -were calling the shots. The Secretary of State of state was even called a “house nigger” by an entertainer, likening him to a favored plantation hand.

    You hold a position of importance at GM. You and GM should be proud of your achievements. I do not think you are “window dressing”. May you continue to be successful in all your endevors.

    Sincerly,
    George W. Bush

    P.S. Laura is really liking that new Buick LaCrosse you got coming. I might have to take her down to our local dealership for a test drive when they become available.

  • avatar
    windswords

    Ronnie Schreiber:

    “It should be noted that Ford, with all of his documented prejudices, didn’t let them stand in the way of evaluating talent.”

    Some of you may know that Gerald Greenwald (hope I spelled his name right) a Jew, was an up and coming executive in the Ford ranks. Lee Iaccoca, steeped in Ford culture for all of his working life, had no problem going after him to bring him over to Chrysler. Greenwald later went on to run United Airlines. People change. Views change. Some of you act like you woke up out of coma of 50 years and think that peoples attitudes are the same they were then.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “Old white guy in a suit” is a state of mind.

    I can recall a recent intra-party election campaign where the victory of the middle-aged white woman over the younger gay man was considered a win for the old white men. I’m also reminded of a more recent incident where an older Lebanese gentleman called a younger black gentleman a figurative old black man and summarily jumped all over by people who thought he (the Lebanese man, who actually has a history of being a problematic progressive) was being racist.

    Go figure.

    I think that the “state of mind” was what Sindell was trying to point out. This is one of those situations where people need to understand what words mean in context, rather than shutting down higher brain functions as soon as they here something that might be offensive.** They are, I think, right that GM design and product planning was beholden to what figurative old white guys*** thought people wanted, rather than what they were actually buying.

    The tokenizing “except” clause was the problem, not the “run by old white guys”. It was an attempt to be witty that went over like a lead balloon.

    ** there’s an urban legend about the use of the word “niggardly” in a business meeting that’s famous for this.

    *** or literal old white guys. Bob Lutz comes immediately to mind.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    The diversity program is racism where white males are treated as second class people.

    I’m going to get jumped on for this, I can feel it.

    I’ve read a number of takes on affirmative action and diversity that contend that it plays into the hands of rich old white people by mis-casting what is actually a class problem as a race problem.

    The problem isn’t that blacks/women/lgbts are black/female/lgbt, it’s that they’re comparatively poor. That the poor happen to be disproportionately less white than the rich is a secondary problem; the primary issue is that the poor are getting poorer, the rich richer and the middle class wiped out. Improve the lot of the poor and the racial/sex problems more or less fox themselves eventually.

    Where this ties back to cars, and to GM in particular, is that these rich folk make the decisions on mass-market products, and that they’re critically detached from the people who actually buy the products.

  • avatar

    I don’t think that thinking creatively is at all the problem. Building unreliable cars for decades and focusing on horsepower over everything else was and is the problem. For most of the population a car is 1) an appliance, 2) a status symbol, in a distant 3) a 0-60 quarter-mile vehicle, and in a even more distant 4) a vehicle that can take a corner well. I would say that GM got it mostly backwards, giving us overpowered drag-racers, which, when they didn’t sell, they would just keep doubling down on.

    I’d rather GM actually got “into the box” and started working on core competencies of reliability and comfort.

    As for diversity and styling: there is no question that the kind of guy GM builds cars for is the same guy that would have bought an IROC-Z Camaro back in the day. The CTS is so overtly macho, and who buys a lot of BMW 3s? Suburban house-moms. They definitely need to get some people in there who care about the feel of plastics in the car and if they are women or black or archetypical gay fashion designers, so be it.

  • avatar
    Potemkin

    One of GM’s problems has been diversity at all levels of the organization. Promotions were and still may be based on meeting a quota for a certain percentage of women and non whites in management roles irrespective of their talent or ability. GM’s HRM mantra was not the best and brightest but rather the most diverse. What you end up with is poor managers and pissed off talented white guys who soon go to companies that will appreciate them.

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