By on May 21, 2009

The National Motorists Association (NMA) yesterday rated all fifty states based on their friendliness toward the motoring public. By analyzing laws and speed trap patterns, the group measured each state’s dependence on the motoring public as a source of state and local revenue. “It is not exactly a well kept secret that many traffic laws, enforcement practices and traffic courts are more about generating revenue and political posturing than they are about traffic safety,” NMA President Jim Baxter said in a statement. “During holidays, like the upcoming Memorial Day weekend, we’re bombarded with messages about intensified enforcement, ‘click it or ticket,’ and horrendous fines when in fact most vacation-related traffic accidents are caused my inattention, distraction and fatigue. However, these are accident causes that don’t generate much in the way of government revenue, so instead our highways are overrun with unmarked police cars and ticket cameras.” The following were the top-ten worst states from the motorist’s perspective:

  1. New Jersey
  2. Ohio
  3. Maryland
  4. Louisiana
  5. New York
  6. Illinois
  7. Delaware
  8. Virginia
  9. Washington
  10. Massachusetts

New Jersey was singled out for being the first to create a “driver responsibility” speeding ticket tax that generated more than $1 billion in profit since 1994. In 2007, a New Jersey judge imprisoned a motorist for a full month over traffic infractions the man did not commit. A New Jersey appellate court convicted a man who was asleep in a legally parked truck of “driving” under the influence of alcohol (DUI). State lawmakers even considered legislation that would have made it a crime to give the finger to another motorist.

“With its toll roadsroadblocks, and speed traps, New Jersey has left almost no stone unturned when it comes to extracting cash from motorists,” NMA explained. “The state has also recently pushed through a red-light camera pilot project at a time when many states are banning the ticket cameras because they’ve proven to have a negative effect on traffic safety.”

The group’s calculation also weighed the number of of speed traps listed on the Speed Trap Exchange website on a per capita basis. Judicial fairness was factored in by considering the availability of jury trials and trials by declaration for traffic offenses or whether mayor’s courts were allowed. The list then considered whether each state had enacted punitive “feel-good” statutes such as primary seatbelt laws, helmet laws, move-over laws and cell-phone bans.

“The long-term solution to aligning legitimate public interests with government policies is to remove the money from traffic regulation, enforcement and adjudication,” Baxter said. “Until that happens, the focus on revenue generation will continue to trump effective traffic regulation and ethical enforcement practices.”

The five states where motorists will find the most fair treatment are Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska and Kentucky. View the full list on the NMA website.

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51 Comments on “Revealed: States Most and Least Friendly to Motorists...”


  • avatar
    Billy Bobb 2

    NJ for the win!

    Tuesday would have been a great day to rob a bank in Old Bridge, NJ as the entire force tied up Old Bridge Road (Rt 516) for an inspection sticker checkpoint.

    NJ has way too many towns with their own little fiefdoms; lots of $100K plus patrolmen. Citations are an integral part of the business plan.

    That Durango from Fort Lee has been paid for many times over by the unfortunate folks who make a left turn onto the GWB…lying in wait like Animal Channel predators are the Fort Lee cops with their daily morning ticket frenzy.

  • avatar
    Cynder70

    I’m suggesting the criteria might be slightly flawed or the “judges” didn’t really look at Alaska. Maybe they could release their data?

    Alaska is rife with speeding, red-light runners and noted for it’s general lack of traffic enforcement. To get a moving violation in this state you’ll need to have some other issue such as a stolen vehicle, extreme window tinting, DUI or no seatbelt.

    just saying

  • avatar
    The Kraut

    Another NJ resident here…

    Facing a budget deficit of roughly 3.6 billion this honestly doesn’t surprise me. (In case you thought California’s budget shortfall was bad… for comparison purposes, California owes roughly $385 per capita, compared to NJ’s $415) The police in this state have been acting as both the gestapo and tax collector for quite some time now. With the current economic conditions, and cash being hemorrhaged out of every orifice, it’s only a matter of time before other states follow our illustrious example.

    Anyone who drives around in NJ for even an insignificant period of time will notice the aggressive police tactics commonly found here: a myriad of speed traps, road blocks, and other various showings of force, all committed to nothing other than bending you over and lightening your wallet.

  • avatar
    snabster

    was in cleveland for a few days. Ohio cops have always been bad. Again too many small cities. But this is at a new level. Saw at least 25+ police out on 271 and 90, and many more local cops on surface streets.

    After a few days of this, I realized what it is like to live in a police state, sweating at every sign of a peace officer.

    “Papers please”

  • avatar
    skor

    @ Billy Bobb 2

    You got that right. I live in Bergen County. Patrolmen with 6 or 7 years on the clock average $100K. There are some chiefs of police that earn over $200K in salary alone (not counting cost of benefits). $200K to oversee police departments that have 20-25 cops. That’s more money than the police chief of Philadelphia earns. Cops can retire with half pay after 20 years and 3/4 pay after 25 years. Pensions are COLA adjusted every year. I know cops who “retired” at 39 or 40 years of age. Every year a new crop of NJ cops retire with pensions that are $100K+. Many departments allow cops to carry unused sick and personal days forward until they retire. Unsued sick days earned in 1975 are paid out at 2009 salary rates. Some cops receive checks for $200-$300K when they retire. Medical benefits are paid for life for the cop and his spouse. Medical co-pay is limited to $5 per doctor visit.

    Don’t get me started on the nepotism and crony-ism at these gold plated Barney Fife departments.

    Is it any wonder that they act like a gang of armed thugs?

  • avatar
    vento97

    The Kraut

    Another NJ resident here…

    Anyone who drives around in NJ for even an insignificant period of time will notice the aggressive police tactics commonly found here: a myriad of speed traps, road blocks, and other various showings of force, all committed to nothing other than bending you over and lightening your wallet.

    Which is precisely why after 35 years, I became an EX-NJ Resident…

    Case in point, I was driving on U.S. 40 in South Jersey recently. I was traveling 5 miles UNDER the speed limit. I passed a State Trooper going in the opposite direction. I looked in my rearview mirror just in time to see the trooper turn around and stayed on my tail (about three car-lengths back) for about 5 miles.

    It was quite obvious he was on a fishing expedition to find an excuse to pull me over, but I wasn’t biting. The trooper eventually turned around and drove away.

    This is a typical NJ State Trooper tactic. So if anyone (driving through NJ) passes a state trooper in the opposite direction, make sure you take a quick glance in your rearview mirror – just to be on the safe side….

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Ohio went bad when the 55 mph limit was passed in the 70s. Politicians realized this was a great cash cow handing out tickets for 59 mph on the interstates designed for 75 mph.
    Before that it was pretty wide open. I remember averaging 87 mph on the Ohio Turnpike between Toledo and Cleveland back in the late 60s. (In my 327 Chevy II with bias ply tires and drum brakes)

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Oh one other thing. What would cops rather do, hand out speeding tix to minivan motivated soccer moms or head to the ghetto and break up drug deals with AK-47 wielding thugs?

  • avatar
    vento97

    Maryland’s position on the list doesn’t surprise me, either – they are the state that has exempted their politicians from being affected by the recently-enacted speed camera law. How nice…

  • avatar
    IGB

    I’m not so sure about this list, but I’m looking at things on a purely subjective level. I moved from NY to SC and I would say that the NY tristate area was very motorist friendly compared to SC where things are downright merciless. I rarely got pulled over up north and infrequently saw speed traps. When I did get pulled over, I mostly was released with a warning.

    Here, they’re everywhere and when pulled over, there is no way out of a citation. They’re like Palmetto Bugs. My octogenarian parents were pulled over as soon as they entered the Greenville area on the interstate and ticketed for going 8MPH over the limit. My wife was recently ticketed for 11MPH over in her minivan with three kids in back. I get 1-2 citations a year, rarely over 10MPH over the limit. My insurance rates are worse than ever and I’m in the best risk category I’ve ever been in. Never had an accident in 25 years of driving but I live in a hostile state.

  • avatar
    vento97

    indi500fan:

    Oh one other thing. What would cops rather do, hand out speeding tix to minivan motivated soccer moms or head to the ghetto and break up drug deals with AK-47 wielding thugs?

    It’s a no-brainer. They go for the infractions which generate the easy money…

  • avatar
    MikeyDee

    I concur with all my fellow New Jerseyans. Why we need a separate police and fire department in EVERY little town escapes me.

    And I have to add this tidbit…racial profiling was invented by the NJ state police. What a great idea…stop an innocent driver on the Turnpike just because they are not caucasian. That makes a lot of sense.

  • avatar
    windswords

    Another ex-NJ and ex-DE guy here. And I live in FL up the street from another who is an ex-OH resident. We could spend all night swapping stories about the police in NJ and OH.

    Even when I was a youngin’ learning to drive I heard about the troopers in MD and how ticket happy they were. This was in the late 70’s. Sure enough they got me on the way home from college break. Unmarked car just over the crest of the hill. Marked cars at the bottom. I was in the left lane on 95 doing about 10 over. Trooper walks into my lane and points to me to pull over. He asks for license, takes it and tells me I’m violation of whatever statute and walks off before I could say anything. Then comes back and gives me the ticket. Not interested in anything I had to say.

  • avatar
    windswords

    If you haven’t joined the National Motorists Association you should. The cost is reasonable and they are the only grass roots organization looking out for drivers.

  • avatar
    commando1

    No coincidence that NJ is also the most corrupt state.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Nice, Maine is #17. I’m not too worried though because Maine’s having a hard time even putting state troopers on the turnpike. Plus they’re cutting 5 Portland Police jobs. It’s not like crime has increased with the recession or anything.

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    Please add to the list province of Ontario. OPP (Ontario Provincial Police) chef introduced a law and dumbf*cks politicians passed it as it generates excellent revenue. Artificially low speed limit on the provincial highways is 100 km/h. The law states that if you’re stopped for doing 50 km/h over the speed limit (applies to regular roads too) your vehicle will be confiscated on the spot and your license will be suspended for seven days. With fine anywhere from $2,000 to $10,000 plus tow and storage fees. And you’re on the spot charged by ‘ocifer’ either with street racing or stunt driving! No court! And it does not matter if you live here or just visiting. And then your insurance rate will skyrocket to $30,000 a year! And insurance here is not cheap to begin with. Also, I think Ontario has agreement with states of New York and Michigan that all infractions are getting onto your record no matter what state or province you’ve got them at.

  • avatar
    jet_silver

    California at #14? That’s kind of surprising. It might be there are some burgs with zealous enforcement but the CHP seem to me pretty tolerant. Several times I have passed a radar car while going fast enough to get ticketed but I’ve heard, and it seems to work – if you -slow down- when you see the CHP car they figure at least you’re paying attention and won’t come after you. I’ve lived in California for nearly thirty years, and the last ticket I got was in 1987; I probably deserved it, too, speeding like an idiot.

  • avatar
    greenb1ood

    I wonder if they took the time to look at the ratio of in-state to out of state revenues. Ohio and Indiana State troopers LOVE Michigan drivers who are used to being able to drive 5-10 over on the highway without repercussions. I’m convinced they drop the speed limits in these states on purpose…all of the sudden, a driver pushing 80 in a 70mph zone for the last two hours is faced with a 65 (Ohio) or 55 (Indiana) zone that’s strictly enforced on the same highway. It only takes 20 minutes to forget and get tagged by a sneaky trooper.

  • avatar
    GeeDashOff

    NJ is not only the most densely populated state in the country, but most of that population is centered in the northeast corner of the state, the NY metro area. On top of that, the cities and (mostly towns) are spread out jusssttt enough that real public transportation (other than buses) is not practical. The end result is everybody has a car, and everybody needs their car to get anywhere. Oh, also throw in the fact that the area is a major transportation hub with multiple major interstate highways crisscrossing the area and lots of out of staters. Thats a pretty good idea of how NSFW’d driving in this area is.

    So yea, the cops here are rough on drivers, but with so many drivers in such a small area is it really any wonder? And as long as it keeps the Jack Baruth types away, I’m fine with that.

  • avatar
    partsisparts

    NJ is the worst by far. It may take you ten miles of driving just to make a U turn!!!

  • avatar
    Robstar

    I’m surprised IL is so high up.

    I’ve been driving since I was 16 (nearing mid 30’s now) and have never received a moving violation, ever. I’ve even gone with the flow of traffic @ 20mph over not passing anyone and made eye contact with a state trooper in the middle of the road and he just went back to whatever he was looking at in his lap (laptop ? writing notes?).

    Am I lucky or is IL over-rated?

    As far as being the most corrupt, I think IL has NJ beat. Look at:

    * Ryan
    * Blago
    * Obama

    Case closed.

  • avatar
    nikita

    California may be #14 on the list based on legalistic criteria, but the reality is that it is much easier to drive here and not fill city/county coffers than most states. The ratio of police/population is low and drug crime is high, so they are busy with “real” law enforcement. Granted, fines are sky-high if you do get ticketed, but I havent since 1970. You have to be going at least 15-20 over the speed limit in most areas to get stopped, unless the real reason for the stop is to search you for drugs. Also, the “speed trap law” prevents cities from posting unreasonably low speed limits and then using radar enforcement. High taxes and smog checks are the only bad things about driving here.

    Oh, and yes, everyone please join the NMA. I’m a member.

  • avatar
    TonUpBoi

    Virginia’s place on the list does not surprise me in the slightest. Where else do you have the combination of: 1. Every county deputy has a radar gun in the cruiser, and, 2. This is the only state (yes, I know about DC) in the union where ownership of a radar detector is illegal.

    And warning’s don’t exist. I talked to a local county deputy a couple of years ago who proudly stated his ‘open door’ policy: If I have to open my cruiser door, somebody’s getting a ticket.

    I moved down here in 1998. In the previous 30 years of driving in Pennsylvania, I’d pulled one moving violation. Driving exactly the same way in Virginia, I’d received nine in the first three years, eight of which would have been illegal by Pennsylvania standards.

    The low point: About a month after moving down here, I was rear-ended hit-and-run on my motorcycle in, what transpired later, an intersection waiting on a red light. I woke up in the hospital ER with two IV’s, a catheter, and a Reckless Driving citation stuffed in my helmet. As I still have no memory of the accident (turns out I was uninjured other than being unconscious), I hired a lawyer and took it to court. The arresting officer comes in and hits the judge with, “There were no witnessess, no skid marks, no evidence of how the accident played out. I figured I’d just write a ticket and we’d figure out what happened in court.”

    In PA, that statement would have cost him his badge. Down here, that’s normal.

  • avatar
    mtypex

    Yes, IL and OH belong on the list. SC, too, if you count … well, the police are aggressive in the Greenville, Columbia, and Charleston areas.

    MI and PA are pretty lax in comparison.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    I have been saying that Ohio is a cop ridden hell hole. Now I have proof.

  • avatar
    zenith

    I’m very surprised that Iowa ranked in the better half. Apparently, nobody asked South Dakotans, Nebraskans, or Minnesotans about their experinces at being singled-out for tickets while Iowa-plated cars travelling at higher speeds were ignored.

    Iowa is picking on its own, though, in the area of seat belt tickets.

    The raters also must have ignored Nebraska between Lincoln and Omaha on Husker home game days.

  • avatar
    DFT-3

    An OH resident here….
    Vindication. As a Cleveland-area resident, I can tell you the cops here are relentless. Not only is it severely annoying to be hounded by speed traps every few miles, but the constant surveillance screws up traffic patterns since most people here have a severe case of ‘copophobia’ (They drive REALLY slow and in packs on the highway). My trusty radar detector has saved me so many times I can’t even count anymore. Its truly sad, as the traffic here is not as bad as other cities and the roads are designed for twice the population.

  • avatar
    kovachian

    I never could understand what the hell Ohio’s problem is. Why is this one midwestern state so much worse than all it’s neighbors?

  • avatar
    MMH

    When giving the finger is outlawed only outlaws will give the finger.

  • avatar
    HEATHROI

    I’m not quite sure what this ranking system is based on or the figures. cases going to court or complaints.

    I’d disagree with this as the route I take to work 355/290 in IL is marked at 55 yet the police don’t seem to do anything until you hit 70+

    robstar

    you did forget the Daleys.

  • avatar
    bill h.

    TonUpBoi :

    Have lived in VA over 20 years (no tickets!) and I’m pretty sure it is NOT illegal to own a detector here, just don’t let them catch you using one.

    If it was illegal to own, they could set up checkpoints on the interstates at the borders and nail every 2nd or 3rd car, right?:^)

    BTW, moved here from Ohio, and drive frequently back there as well as through Maryland, NJ etc. so I’ve been either very lucky or just reasonably well conditioned to spot out the traps over 3+ decades of driving.

  • avatar
    FunkyD

    As a native Buckeye, I can attest that Ohio has always been notorious for ticket-writing (glad I left 15 years ago). Michigan and Ontario plates are particular targets.

    I offer the following quote from The Cannonball Run:
    “Think of the fact that there’s not one state in the 50 that has the death penalty for speeding… although I’m not so sure about Ohio.”

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    I’ve lived in Jersey for almost 5 years now. It’s a lousy place to be a motorist. I lived in Illinois 12 years.

    With all due respect to the B&B colleagues in my old home state of Illinois, we’ve got you beat on the corruption. Yeah, in Illinois they get caught at the top. But it really is endemic to the system here in NJ, Daley regime and all. Heck, I remember when they found $700,000 in Paul Powell’s shoebox collection. Seriously, my mom cried because she thought he was one of the “good guys.”

    I lived in Georgia and Florida too, and I understand “Good Old Boy” networks. The difference in The South, is that if you ask the right questions the right way, you can find out who is in on the fix. You can figure it out.

    Here in New Jersey, you don’t know. Newark’s last three mayors have served jail time.

    As soon as my kids are done in the local schools, me and Mrs. Panhard are outta here.

  • avatar
    gntlben

    They forgot about we DC residents…sniff…we’d probably fare pretty badly though.

  • avatar
    stef

    If you get a chance to try, http://www.trapster.com, let us know what you think!

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    The reason that Nebraska is on the ‘nice’ list vs the ‘naughty’ list is that they leave this “revenue stream” for the local communities. The State Troopers are more inclined to target suspected smugglers of illegal drugs and illegal workers.

  • avatar
    blautens

    @ Skor

    Cops can retire with half pay after 20 years and 3/4 pay after 25 years. Pensions are COLA adjusted every year. I know cops who “retired” at 39 or 40 years of age.

    And half of them moved to south Florida and went back into law enforcement until they could draw on their retirement. Ugh. Double ugh. I didn’t meet one who wasn’t lazy, dumb, and/or greedy. If I did, it’s only because he didn’t ‘fess up to his origins for fear of having the stigma the rest were deservedly earning.

    I hated working next to them…you could pretty much count on handling your zone and their zone while they figured out a way to not do police work, do it poorly, and/or find customers for whatever side business they were in. They absolutely didn’t want to advance (in skills or as a person), just serve out their time as long as they could until there was either no penalty in starting pension withdrawal or until the weasels actually got vested in the Florida Retirement System for pension check #2 (albeit much smaller).

    We just lumped them into one giant category of “retired New Yorker” when referring to them. Every other officer knew exactly wheat you meant. Supervisors couldn’t put too many in one area or crime would run rampant.

  • avatar
    Tummy

    I’ve lived in Jersey City, NJ for 8 years and haven’t really had many problems. I speed pretty often, but have never had a speeding ticket in NJ. I’m usually 10 over and have never been pulled over in NJ in all that time. Of course the real speeders in NJ are doing 100 in a 65 zone.

    Most of the week I work in Cleveland, OH and in the past 4 years have gotten two speeding tickets there for as little as 5mph over the limit.

    Prior to living in NJ we lived in a Chicago suburb. Insurance in NJ was more than double the cost of Illinois.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    IL doesn’t seem so bad, my opinion. Yes, chicago uses quite a few red light cameras with yellows at bare minimum (and probably below). And yes, the 55mph speed limits in RURAL areas is absolutely ridiculous (cross WI border, you’re in grasslands, and it drops to 55….The new I355 in the west boonies has almost nothing around, is at least 3-4 lanes wide, light traffic, and is 55mph), but troopers don’t seem to be around too frequently, and they really don’t seem to do much unless you’re up in the 70-80mph range. If you’re lucky, traffic is heavier and they won’t do anything anyway.

    I’ve always been shocked at how in the most rural, lightest traffic areas, traffic actually goes slower than urban areas with lower limits. Too easy to get picked off out there all by yourself, despite the speeding probably being far safer.

    Agreed on Indiana though. I used to drive between Chicago and Valparaiso for work on the tollroad. There were days in this 30 or so mile stretch that I would see over 10 ISP troopers waiting for motorists. I’ve been passed by ISP cars doing 80mph multiple times, only to see them pull to the median a few miles up the road and wait for motorists doing over 65 in a 55 (again in almost entirely rural areas). Its DISGUSTING. And its precisely because they know that entire road is pretty much only used by Michiganders and Chicagoans driving through Indiana. Its 10x worse in the summer months. Chicagoans heading to West Michigan for their weekend get-aways are easy prey.

    I grew up in Idaho. Our local speed limits are set too low, and they’ll stop you for anything5mph over usually. But the fines are what i now consider “dirt cheap”, they’ll give warnings, they’re friendly, and you definitely have zero feeling of the “got-ya” attitude from the police there. Sometimes I think of moving back….Chicago rules, taxes, and heavy-handed police and politicians can be very draining. Going back to a state that distrusts anything government, and demands every last bit of waste is eliminated before ever even considering a tax increase sometimes sounds very appealing….despite my being a big-city kinda guy…

  • avatar
    findude

    Regarding legality of radar detectors in Virginia: every time you enter Virginia there is a sign stating “Radar Detectors Illegal”.

    Back in the 1990s there was a lot of fluff about this and some cases made it to the state supreme court. The long and short of it is that you may own a radar detector in VA, you may even have it in your car, but it may not have a source of power. This resulted because no state can interfere with interstate commerce, and someone might just, you know, be transporting radar detectors through the state on a commercial basis.

    I’ve been a Capital Beltway commuter off and on for over 20 years, and there has been one change in just the last two years or so. It used to be that during rush hour nobody was ever pulled over on the Beltway–law enforcement had observed that a parked cruiser with lights on slowed traffic down and caused jams for miles. Now they pull people over all the time.

  • avatar

    Gotta send a shout-out to Kentucky on this one: 70mph limits, few speed traps to speak of, and cops generally with more on their minds (rampant drug problems) than people safely travelling at 90mph or so.

    The only stupidity we endure is a “property tax” levied annual on our cars.

    Granted this is subject to change–all our municipalities are in the hole, and the KY D.O.T. is, too. I see toll roads, increased enforcement, and higher taxes in our future.

  • avatar
    rhpzero

    Come on! Not even close NJ!

    In Vermont a man was convicted of DUI in a broken car up on cinderblocks in his own driveway.

    And the state supreme court upheld the conviction! They ruled that the driveway was part of the network of roads in the state and not the man’s own land.

  • avatar

    Who would have imagined that states with next to nobody living in them are nice places to drive?

  • avatar
    AG

    Does quality of roads factor into motor friendliness? I’ve seen roads in Iran of higher quality than some of the ones we’ve got. Its a miracle I haven’t had to have the entire suspension replaced by now.

  • avatar
    Boston

    NJ ain’t that bad. I’m a JC guy too. All the cops have guns and if you travel the same route, you know where they stay. You can have some fun in NJ from time to time.

    Ohio and VA are fking horrible for sure. MD is up there too.

    Germany is awesome – I love the Autobahn so, so much.

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    gntlben
    Ben, Is that you? what are you talking about, i never get a ticket in DC with all the crazy shit i do.

  • avatar
    vento97

    As far as being the most corrupt, I think IL has NJ beat. Look at:

    * Ryan
    * Blago
    * Obama

    Case closed.

    Sorry pal, NJ wrote the book on corruption. Bike gangs, street gangs, motorcycle gangs, political gangs, etc. IL is PAYING royalties to NJ.

    NJ was a state LONG before IL. It’s the training ground for the MOB before the mob was exported to the midwest. NJ is a hop, skip and jump from Ellis Island – the entry point for future mob members back in the day.

    Case closed.

  • avatar
    morbo

    Well, it’s Benny and Shoobie season down the shore, so be forewarned. Born and reaised in Atlantic City, Having worked in Ocean City and Egg Harbor, putting hundreds of thousands of miles on the Parkway and AC Expressway, all I can say is be ready. Set the cruise 10 MPH BELOW the speed limit, and drive like an 80 year old grandmother.

    And you might not get a ticket*.

    *not valid in Wildwood, Avalon, Ocean City, Seaside Heights, or Asbury Park.

  • avatar
    skor

    BTW, whoever took the picture of the Fort Lee cop SUV really has some balls. Taking a picture of a cop, or any cop type equipment, in Jersey is very likely to get you beaten and arrested.

  • avatar
    MadHungarian

    Georgia just passed a “super speeder law” which tacks an extra $200 onto the already high speeding fines if you are clocked over 70 on a two lane road or 85 on a freeway or other divided highway. Our speed limit on rural Interstates is 70. Rarely will you get ticketed for anything below 80 and the average speed is about 75-77. This means a whole lot of “super speeders” will get ticketed who are in fact moving only a few MPH over the flow of traffic.

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