By on April 16, 2009

This year is going to be a devastatingly bad one for car valuations. If you’re a keeper, this is great news. New and near-new cars are going to continue with their proverbial freefall. You will more than likely be able to get a good vehicle with 80 percent of its useful life for 40 percent of the price (two to four year old vehicle). The frugalists amongst the keeper crowd will likely do even better than that. A well-engineered seven- to nine-year-old vehicle may truly be the best sweet spot in the market right now. With some diligence, you can find a conservatively driven car with 50 percent of its life (90k to 120k miles) for a mere 20 percent of its new car price. But what will be the absolute best deals? Read on . . .

The unloved leftover rules! I always encourage folks to buy a car during its last year of the model run or get the unpopular but well-made car that’s going to be discontinued. Either one will be a strong overall value. Some like to say that brands that are on the ropes and periphery (e.g., Saturn, Suzuki, Hummer, Mitsubishi) deserve special consideration. I disagree. At least for the enthusiast, the quality of the design and culture of the company that made the car will be there long after the brand is defunct. “Cheap” is expensive and sometimes discounts are there for a good reason . . . but sometimes you can have them for the taking.

So what’s on my “best” list for new cars? Glad you didn’t ask. But, OK. Here are a few:

  • Entry Level: Nissan Versa; Mitsubishi Lancer
  • Compact Funster: Suzuki SX4
  • Midsize Family Car: Kia Optima (4-cylinder); Saturn Aura; Ford Fusion; Chevy Malibu
  • Full-Size Novocaine: Ford Taurus / Mercury Sable; leftover Azeras.
  • Sub-$30K Convertibles: Chrysler Sebring Convertible (sorry, that’s $13K); Mazda MX-5
  • Conventional Sports Sedan and/or Coupe: Nissan Altima
  • Schizoid Sports Sedan: Lexus IS-F
  • Minivan Mommies: Hyundai Entourage
  • Breadbox Design Inc.: Honda Element; Ford Flex
  • Truck: Perhaps a Dodge Ram 30 days from now. Otherwise a Toyota Tacoma.

Which car would I be willing to keep for the next 15 years?

2007 Volvo V70R

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

58 Comments on “Hammer Time: Look Out! Here Comes a Spider Pig…...”


  • avatar
    johnny ro

    If there are any Saturn Astras left for cheap, well, that is a car to like.

    I don’t like 120k mile cars at any price, don’t like medium to large unscheduled repairs.

  • avatar
    Ronman

    how cheap are we talking here?

    cause a V70R would be a welcomed choice

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    I don’t like 120k mile cars at any price, don’t like medium to large unscheduled repairs.

    Or living in fear of whether or not the timing belt has been changed!

  • avatar
    Usta Bee

    Depending on the year some of the vehicles on the list have had problems:

    Chevy Malibu- electric steering and steering column problems.

    Nissan Altima- Catalytic converter breakdown with pieces being sucked back into the engine and destryoing it. Also, screws falling out of the throttle being sucked into the intake manifold.

    Toyota Tacoma- rapid premature frame rail rust problems leading to Toyota buybacks.

  • avatar

    `The latest deal I’ve spotted is a whoppin’ 6500$ off the Canadian price of a new-leftover 2009 Mustang GT to make way for the 2010. This is posted on the manufacturer site, I have yet to spot the deal at my local (does what it likes) dealership. But it takes the ‘Stang from “not that great” (33K MSRP) to “I’m willing to overlook some flaws” (28,5K out the door).

    If you want to go lower, used Mustangs are a dime a dozen, and this discount will further kill residuals for current owners.

  • avatar
    ccd1

    I totally agree with the author that buying a solid car in the last year of the model run is a smart buy. Did that last year with no regrets.

    As for the list, however, I have a different perspective. Personally, in new cars, I look for vehicles that just offer much more than the competition at a given price point. For example, in the sub $40k sports sedan market, there are some real standouts: Pontiac G8 GT, Mustang GT, RX-8, Genesis Coupe and G37 Sedan. Of this group, the better new car buys are probably the Ford, Hyundia and the Infiniti. I love the RX-8, but first year depreciation of $7-8k is hard to swallow and my bet is that the Pontiac will suffer a similar fate as the brand is on the chopping block.

  • avatar
    mikeolan

    @Usta Bee: That only effected two model years of the Altima. From 05 on that has not been an issue, unlike the Accord Transmission issue.

  • avatar
    50merc

    How the heck can a car suck catalytic converter parts into the engine? I didn’t think engines can run backwards.

  • avatar
    sardaukar

    Alas, I don’t think any of the cars I’d want to buy are going to be affected in a big way by the market conditions. 2009 Honda S2000, I’m looking in your direction….

  • avatar
    taxman100

    I’d take a Grand Marquis or a Crown Vic long before a Taurus/Sable. Ridiculous prices on one year old models, and they will flat out run forever with just a few fairly simple repairs over those several hundred thousand miles.

    Proven track record counts for a lot. Having owned both front and rear wheel drive Fords in the past, promises are just that – promises.

    Try fixing those stupid CVT trannies Ford in the early 500/Montegos.

  • avatar
    TRL

    A low mialege Diamonte while a 100 year old design is still a nicer car than a Malibu or Fusion for a lot less $. Like buying an old Acura CL for chump change. This was their top of the line and it showed.

  • avatar
    jckirlan

    I have been wanting to buy a lghtly used 2008 Suburban LTZ but man o man are they holding their value. I don’t see any recessionary pricing in these.

  • avatar
    radimus

    Buying in the 90-120k miles range isn’t so bad. Shop wisely and have any questionable service issues, such as timing belts, taken care of as soon as possible. To make unscheduled repairs easier to deal with, buy an extra vehicle in the same price range or less as a spare. Maybe something fun to drive or something with more utility than the daily driver. At least in the US the extra cost of insurance and maintenance will still be much less than making payments on something newer.

  • avatar
    Billy Bobb 2

    50 merc:

    Combination cat/exhaust manifold design (“pre-cat”, placed closest to exhaust heat to aid cat warm up aka “light-off”) is the start.

    Scrimp on the cat innards; they break and are ingested, scoring cylinder walls fatally.
    More common than you’d imagine.

    Mr. Lang

    While the SX4 is a terrific package I’m seeing Suzuki dealers fold weekly. Any Suzuki is a risky purchase, what good will a 7 year warranty be?

  • avatar
    ttacfan

    New 4 cyl. Mitsubishi Outlander and used Kia Rondo looks like terrific values, at least in the North East Ohio area.

    If only one can get over horrible seats and “rolling uterus” looks of Rondo, he/she will be getting an ’08 model with more bumper-to-bumper warranty than average new car, for $12-15K.

  • avatar
    sadicnd

    Mr. Lang,

    That’s the ‘new car’ suggestion list. Could you kindly give a ‘used car’ suggestion list please.
    Thanks.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    Thank you. I like your insights here. Much appreciated.

  • avatar

    Steve, there’s a missing category that a friend has been asking about that I don’t think you covered:
    = basic awd car
    and maybe also
    = fancy awd car
    She lives in the Northeast and has a half-mile uphill driveway. awd/4wd is a requirement…
    You *do* get snow in Georgia once in a while don’t you?

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    Basic AWD Car: Suzuki SX4. If you’re concerned about their long-term survival the Impreza AWD can be had for about $1000-$1500 more.

    Fancy AWD Car: Really depends. Unless you live in ‘Northern Country’ chances are that you don’t need AWD. For me a Forester is pretty fancy in higher end trim. But others would consider a Volvo Cross Country or a German AWD wagon to be more fitting.

    I would probably opt for the Volvo… and see if I can buy it cheaper at a dealership that’s located in a more temperate climate. There are a surprising number of lightly used Cross Country models in the southeast that will never be used for their intended purpose.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    I’m seeing under 100k late 90s miatas for $3-$4k on craigslist. I might actually pick one up soon.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    For used car models I’ll put it this way…

    Most folks already have made up their minds by the time I have a conversation with them. As a fellow who prefers wagons and hatchbacks, and despises pseudo-utility vehicles, I’m probably as far away from conventional tastes as Finland is from Tasmania.

    Go to the used car review sites, visit an enthusiast site or two, and if that’s what you want in a used car… buy it. Follow my series on buying a used car at TTAC and you’ll come out far ahead.

  • avatar
    tedward

    I’d recomend taking that Element off the list. I’ve spoken well of it for a while (here at TTAC even), but my mother owns one and it’s turned out to have a very troubling and expensive taste for rear brakes (pad and rotor). The Honda dealer is excellent (this isn’t a sour grapes comment) but their best solution has been to “avoid dirt roads”…in an all-wheel drive utility vehicle…sold in a rural county.

    It’s a design flaw plain and simple, and one that Honda is refusing to address. The car is no longer economical to own, and as it has no dynamic upside (to say the very f___ing least about that), it’s got to go.

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    I agree with taxman…the omission of the Panther chassis Crown Vic/Grand Marquis is glaring. It’s probably the most cost effective/reliable ride out there.

  • avatar
    no_slushbox

    dolo54:

    “I’m seeing under 100k late 90s Miatas for $3-$4k on craigslist. I might actually pick one up soon.”

    I just did; I highly recommend it.

    Or you can get a new Grand Touring PRHT 0 mile 2008 Miata for $20K ($8K off sticker), but I’m 6’2″ and live in Chicago, so as tempted as I was I didn’t pay $20K for a second car.

    Since I bought a used Miata I won’t be able to write off the sales tax, but on the other hand the sales tax on my private party Miata purchase was $25.

  • avatar
    Rastus

    Steve,

    Can you please explain what you mean by a “leftover” Azera? It’s not a car I follow closely- are they being discontinued? For a big roomy car, I think they’re pretty decent.

    Also, to the individual who brought up the rusting of the Tacoma frame…has this been resolved? I was actually considering a 4-cyl 4×4 base model w/ a manual as my next purchase. Gas prices are already creeping back up…$2/gal in my neck of the woods, whereas it was $1.49 late last year.

    Thank you.

  • avatar
    Zammy

    Where would a low-mileage Chrysler 300C fit into this scheme? I’m considering a purchase, it seems like an attractive combination of price, power, and features in today’s market.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Also, to the individual who brought up the rusting of the Tacoma frame…has this been resolved?

    Some time ago, yes. The rust issue applied to Tacomas up to MY2000.

    It’s like bringing up Toyota’s oil sludging (not an issue after 2001) or Honda’s V6/Auto issues (not a problem after 2004): they’ll all four or more years ago, and have all been fixed. Heck, even if you buy a Tacoma of that vintage, the corrosion warranty has been extended to fifteen years without any kind of “original owner” nonsense. It’s the most carte-blanche warranty extension I’ve ever heard of.

  • avatar
    imag

    This “buy the last year of the old model” philosophy makes no sense if you’re not going to keep the car for more than 5 years.

    Example: I was looking at buying a 370Z or an S2000 this year. If I buy the 370Z, it’s immediately worth quite a bit on the resale market because there are people just waiting to snap them up who can’t afford them new. On the other hand, if I buy an S2K, then need/want to sell it, its value is dragged down by the fact that someone can get a 2002 S2K with ridiculously low miles for $15K. If they’re already buying used, their incentive to buy my late-model car for anything closed to what I paid for it is pretty minimal.

    I also take exception to the “idiocy of buying new” philosophy. I am just clawing myself away from two cars that were great deals used, which all the right signs, but which felt like they developed a new problem every time I got in them. It sucks. When you’re buying new, you’re buying (hopefully) peace of mind. When people say, “just buy it after two years when it has come down in price,” that makes no sense. I’m paying more for the first two years because that’s when I can expect not to have to replace clutches, suspension, tires, etc.

    For people who value their time, buying new is not unreasonable. Spending that time on a car site might be ;).

  • avatar
    boredlawstudent

    I also take exception to the “idiocy of buying new” philosophy. I am just clawing myself away from two cars that were great deals used, which all the right signs, but which felt like they developed a new problem every time I got in them. It sucks. When you’re buying new, you’re buying (hopefully) peace of mind. When people say, “just buy it after two years when it has come down in price,” that makes no sense. I’m paying more for the first two years because that’s when I can expect not to have to replace clutches, suspension, tires, etc.

    That’s why you buy CPO. Save 35-40% off the price of a new car for a gently used 2 year old model with a better warranty than new. When I purchased mine, I received a hefty B2B warranty, and a completely refurbished car (new tires, pads, rotors, wipers, filters, etc.) .

  • avatar
    lzaffuto

    For fun and practicality, you might add the previous-gen Mazda 3S 5-door hatchback to the list. I’ve even seen the whiz-bang kitted out grand touring models going for dirt cheap since the new generation arrived on the lot. It’s a great fun-to-drive car, very practical, and unlike the new gen, it doesn’t look like a sea monster.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Testing… testing… Is this thing on?

    boredlawstudent: “That’s why you buy CPO. Save 35-40% off the price of a new car for a gently used 2 year old model with a better warranty than new.”

    Is this the case for all makes? Are you referring to 35-40% off the real transaction prices for new or 35-40% off MSRP of new?

    Friends of ours, last year, went off to buy a used Accord. A new one was about the same price. Hondas hold their value pretty well. Ditto Toyotas. I can see maybe getting a bargain on a Benz, Bimmer, VW or Volvo. Maybe for an Impala or a Sebring… but is CPO worth anything on an Impala or Sebring? Dealer stonewalling and legendary GM/Chrysler “quality” seem to me to combine to make this a risky move.

  • avatar
    mikeolan

    @boredlawstudent :

    You don’t actually save 35-40% off with CPO unless it’s a domestic brand or nobody wants the model. In some cases it can be more expensive if the financing on a new model is extremely low. All you really get is an extended warranty, which depending on the case might be good for powertrain but nothing else after two years (or less.)

  • avatar
    jmo

    Save 35-40% off the price of a new car for a gently used 2 year old model with a better warranty than new.

    What cars are you talking about? Most decent cars are still worth 50% after five years – where are you getting 40% depreciation in two years at CPO prices?

  • avatar
    radimus

    Probably over at the local GM or Chrysler dealer looking at the 2007 untitled leftovers.

  • avatar
    shaker

    50merc :
    “How the heck can a car suck catalytic converter parts into the engine? I didn’t think engines can run backwards.”

    The Nissan 2.5 4-cyl leaves the exhaust valve open a bit after TDC on the exhaust stroke – this causes some exhaust gases to be sucked back into the cylinder. Apparently this is a type of EGR for emissions.

    Problem was that the computer fuel mix software was allowing the pre-cat to overheat, and it would fracture – some of the resulting ceramic dust would get sucked into the cylinder and… you know the rest.

    There was a “silent recall” on that one, where they would re-flash the ECU (and maybe replace the pre-cat), but basically Nissan dropped the ball on that one – beware of those years, as oil consumption is slightly higher to real bad, depending on how much ceramic dust got into the motor.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Probably over at the local GM or Chrysler dealer looking at the 2007 untitled leftovers.

    But they are offering 40% off ’09s… are you saying you are geting 40% off the actual 09 price?

  • avatar
    RedStapler

    For a budget AWD category the Jeep Cherokee is also a contender. Yes it will suck gas but if you only drive it for the 2-4 months of the year when the weather is truly crappy its no big deal. Parts are cheap and plentiful and it is fairly DIY friendly.

  • avatar
    zaitcev

    The problem with these lists is the variation between cars. I sold my 97 Neon after 178,000 miles. Excellent car in any respect, but when I bought it, everyone was shocked… shocked! The Neon, they said, you must be mad! Ditto Lancer. If you luck upon one that was well made, that’s great. I’d like me one of them. This variation is thought to be mostly applicable to used cars, but as Neon shows they come from the factory different enough.

  • avatar
    boredlawstudent

    I purchased a 2007 CPO G35 with 26K miles for $24K from an Infiniti dealer in Florida. MSRP was around $36K (Journey model plus a few options). The standard CPO warranty covers you up to 100K but it is pretty much powertrain after the factory B2b runs out at 60K. They “threw in” a Infiniti Elite B2B wrap warranty for another $800 that covers me for another 5 years up to 100K. Used car prices are falling like rocks around here since there are loads of them coming off lease now.

    As for financing, I used Penfed which is 3.99% for 60 months for used autos. Better than any interest rate I’ve seen. I found out the hard way that for new autos (i.e. Honda, Nissan, not domestics), manufacturer interest rates may be lower (i.e. 1.9-2.9%), but they often cannot be combined with rebate cash.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    The Crown Vic is fleet only… Grand Marquis isn’t. You do have a point though. If that’s what you want, it’s practically there for the taking. I’ll add it.

    ‘This “buy the last year of the old model” philosophy makes no sense if you’re not going to keep the car for more than 5 years.’

    Keepers don’t keep cars for only five years. That’s who I was addressing in this write-up. As for traders… they are usually better off buying popular vehicles in general.

  • avatar
    willbodine

    How about a 2007 M-B E350 with under 40,000 miles (still under factory warranty) for $22,900. Checked out well on CarFax, the only downside was MB Tex (vinyl) instead of leather. Who could guess that a $60,000 plus new car offered leather as a (pricy) option? Or that resale values drop off a cliff after 2 years.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    superbadd75 : Or living in fear of whether or not the timing belt has been changed!

    Why would you do that? Either you have receipts showing that it has been changed, or you change it.

  • avatar
    Rastus

    Have nearly all cars gone to the timing belt, vice a timing chain? It wasn’t too long ago that chains were common, right?

    What’s the argument in favor of a belt vs. a chain? While a chain may be a bit more noisy, it’ll outlive a piece of rubber.

    Anyone know? I don’t…that’s why I’m asking :)

    Thanks.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    Will, I was actually going to add the E-Class for the luxury car offering. The depreciation on them is absolutely amazing.

  • avatar
    50merc

    Good explanation, Shaker. Thanks.

    Rastus, I haven’t done any systematic research but my impression is that the trend is away from timing belts to chains. It probably took a while, but I think a lot of customers now realize timing belt replacement expense is a strong argument for making sure their next car has a chain.

    doctorV8 and taxman100, I noticed the Grand Marquis now has a $5,000 rebate. (And maybe another $1,000 for “GM/Chrysler conquest” customers?) That should drive the price of year-old Panther cars down even more.

  • avatar

    Great post Mr Lang.
    I wouldn’t take the Versa despite its amazing interior space as they aren’t proving reliable.
    I wouldn’t touch the aura either due to long-term parts availability (did it sell as critical mass?)

    Used Mustang, used Mazda 6 + wagon, used 300 or 300C etc..all amazing bargains right now.

  • avatar
    jmo

    MSRP was around $36K

    When has anyone ever paid sticker for a G35? With a sticker of 36,450 and an invoice of 33,859 and 0.9% Infinity financing (vs. 3.9) you are talking 30,659. So, in realty you only saved 20%.

    Now assuming the G35 is going to last 15year and 250k miles it has used up 13% of its useful life.

    So, long story short you saved 7%. For me, 7% is just not worth all the hassle and risk.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    Hmmmm…. $2500 (7% of the total) over 13 years at 5% interest makes….

    $4714

    We just spent $1227 on a 4 day Disney Cruise last March. So perhaps if this fellow’s lucky he can afford to go on maybe three Disney cruises over that time period.

    Personally, I would take three Disney cruises and a longer warranty any day of the week.

    Now if we take a car like the 2 year old E-Class mentioned, we start hitting that 40% price 80% life left ratio that I love so much. The savings on that one over time would likely be well over $25 grand. For that money I can give my wife and kids an awful lot of adventures.

  • avatar
    Rastus

    Again, what did you mean by the “leftover” Azeras?

    Just wondering…I’d much rather have an Azera than an Impala any day of the week.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Hmmmm…. $2500 (7% of the total) over 13 years at 5% interest makes….

    $4714

    How much extra needs to go wrong with a G35 to eat up that $4714 over 13 years?

    Again, even $4714 isn’t enough, I feel, to compensate me for dealing with all that extra hassle.

    Just an example – if my car doesn’t start some Monday morning I can miss my flight, get bumped and miss half a week (if not longer) of work. I work for myself and bill $6000 a week. If my car leaves me stranded one extra time in 13 years, I’ve blow though all the money I saved buying used.

  • avatar
    zaitcev

    If a high dispatch reliablitiy is necessary on Monday morning, a better solution would be to have two cars and drive them on alternating weeks; immediately fix the one that breaks.

  • avatar
    boredlawstudent

    Jmo,

    I don’t think your calculating this correctly. First, interest rates for a new G35 are 2.9% for 60 months (a difference of 1% between used and new). Second, that low interest rate cannot be combined with dealer cash, so you’re not paying under invoice (for the 2007 model yeah, people were paying just under MSRP for the G35). Fourth, you fail to take into account the difference in sales tax paid on the much more expensive new car. Fifth, you seem under the impression that a lightly used CPO car with a LONGER b2b warranty is somehow going to be less reliable than a new one.

    BTW, we all thank you for letting us know you bill $6000/wk. Must be nice.

  • avatar
    200k-min

    Is there some kind of cult that worships the Ford Panther platform? Seriously, the only people I see driving those things are collecting social security or cops. They are cramped inside, get crappy fuel economy and have been outdated since the Taurus redefined style in the mid-1980’s. There’s a reason they are so cheap, because they are outdated garbage.

  • avatar
    tedward

    2006-min

    +1
    and thank you.

    Aside from some visibility issues I just don’t understand why one would pick this over a chrysler LX. I’ve been in police models too, and they still don’t hold a candle to the bone-stock 5.7.

    Sometimes I wonder just how many everyday items could be named that are decidedly younger than the mechanical design of the panther cars. At least they post-date the invention of plastic.

  • avatar
    paris-dakar

    Is there some kind of cult that worships the Ford Panther platform? Seriously, the only people I see driving those things are collecting social security or cops. They are cramped inside, get crappy fuel economy and have been outdated since the Taurus redefined style in the mid-1980’s. There’s a reason they are so cheap, because they are outdated garbage.

    That’s simply not true. A BOF Sedan has various virtues to recommend it (mostly related to strength and ruggedness) that some portion of the market finds attractive. Face it, some people just don’t want to drive a FWD, Unibody, CV Jointed Car but they don’t want a Truck either.

    I’ll be very sorry to see the Panther Platform die. The Big Three (or whatever is left of it) will be missing an opportunity there, it’s a classically American market segment and with fleet sales could easily average 200k units per year.

  • avatar
    AuricTech

    As someone who bought a 2007 SX4 brand-new, I have to agree that it’s a fine choice for a “Compact Funster,” especially the AWD hatch version (which is all that was available in MY 2007).

    The main problem areas with 2007 SX4s are the A/C compressor clutch and the unfortunate placement of one of the O2 sensors; the former fails more often than it should, and the latter is prone to having used oil drip on it during oil changes. Both of these issues have been addressed in MY 2008+ vehicles.

    One thing to keep in mind if you’re considering buying an SX4 online is that “SX4 Sport” has several meanings:

    1. For 2007 SX4s, “SX4 Sport” is a trim level for the hatchback.

    2. For 2008 SX4s, “SX4 Sport” is the term used for the sedan model (available only in FWD).

    3. For 2009 SX4s, “SX4 Sport” is the sportier version of the SX4 sedan (for whatever reason, Suzuki decided to offer a decontented version as the “SX4 Sedan”).

  • avatar
    davey49

    I love how people actually believe that “Certified” actually means something.
    “Certified” by who? It’s not like there’s some kind of agency going around to dealers saying, “This one’s good, sell it!”
    The 2007 Element has an average mark in CR for brakes, usually reliable cars will have better or much better than average. The Element has had problems with the windshields cracking.
    Rastus- most have gone to chains. There was a time when belts were preferred for less noise, more compact packaging and simpler oiling (no oil bath required for the chain)
    The development of quieter single row chains has helped with the noise and packaging issues.
    The Taurus/Sable has a ton more room than the Crown Vic/G.Marquis.

  • avatar
    tedward

    davey49

    The Element that I have to deal with has gone through 3 sets of pads and rotors in the past 6 months…and about half that cost has been eaten by the Honda dealer. They’ve admitted that they have other customers with the same problem, which was confirmed by a local mail-woman who had to get rid of hers for the same reason. Apparently any exposure to dust or dirt pretty much guarantees shot rotors (this is Honda’s explanation) and they recommend that a) the car never be driven on dirt roads, and b) the car be brought in no less than every 10k miles to have the brakes checked. Obviously both of these solutions are unnacceptable.

    The Element is never hooned or driven aggresively and otherwise it’s been problem free (with about 56k miles on it right now). Honda has not made any changes to the car, and as far as the owner has heard, has no plans to do so, even though the dealer service dept. admits there’s a design problem.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • ToolGuy: Crucial question: Will Barra fly commercial?
  • Dan: Because the transition to EVs with four hour batteries will be a less difficult sell if they can get you used to...
  • JMII: My B5 had that “soft touch” interior which peeled like a sunburn and it went thru window regulators...
  • dal20402: “Survey: Americans Want Free Money and Ponies.” Right now the EV market is still a bit of a...
  • Lou_BC: @Arthur Dailey – agreed. My dad would say, “Don’t act tough. There’s always someone...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Jo Borras
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber