By on April 8, 2009

On Sunday, GM CEO Fritz Henderson went out of his way to avoid waving the American flag in his desperate attempt to sell the idea that his employer had a future building and selling cars in the US market. Well, duh. Ford, GM and Chrysler are not exactly in the best position to go all protectionist, given the huge number of parts and vehicles the ailing American automakers imports from abroad, discounting (and how) the vehicles they want to keep selling abroad. But The Detroit News boldly goes where Rick Wagoner’s clone fears to tread. All columnist Marney Rich Keenan’s “Buying American cars: It’s finally catching on” needs is an exclamation mark. [And an accompanying image that’s not a photochop.] Say it ain’t so, Joe! In this case, “Joe” is Keenan’s culture-loving brother, makes the connection between purchasing American cars and GM’s support for the arts. Which will no doubt be toast as the Presidential Task Force on Autos gets stuck in. Anyway, here come the usual suspects . . .

Dr. Bruce Garretson, an ophthalmologist with offices in Royal Oak and Rochester, has bought BMWs for almost two decades. This will be the first year he will buy an American-made vehicle. “Although I prefer the way a BMW drives,” the father of two college-age sons says. “I believe that supporting Detroit is more important than my personal taste given our current economic condition.”

To her credit, Keenan found this guy. And, as a highly trained professional journalist writing for a major city newspaper, she realizes that one Bimmer defector does not a trend make (despite the headline). So, naturally, Keenan turns to the organic food business for something that almost approaches factual information.

Reflecting a similar trend, a statistic has been making the e-mail rounds lately that has galvanized consumers to buy local. According to the Michigan Department of Agriculture, the projection is: “If every household started spending just $10 per week of their current grocery budget on locally grown foods, we’d keep more than $37 million each week circulating within Michigan’s economy.”

OK? Ready to connect the dots? If only Keenan shared your preparedness—and dumped her prejudice. And lost her ignorance.

Who knows? One visit to the site [buymichiganproducts.com] and you might be eating Kellogg’s brand cereal from Battle Creek and Jiffy Mix muffins from Chelsea for breakfast, Koegel’s deli meats from Flint for lunch and Romano’s pasta sauce from Shelby Township for dinner with a glass of Merlot from St. Julian in Paw Paw or a glass of milk from Guernsey Farms in Northville.

Now, if we could just get the members of President Obama’s auto task force to dump their personally owned foreign-made vehicles. In February, Detroit News Washington Bureau Chief David Shepardson reported only two of the eighteen policymakers own American-made vehicles. Unfortunately, that track record is no laughing matter at all.

Hey, Keenan. Take it from those of us actually following this story, a little laughter is no bad thing.

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58 Comments on “Buy American: You Can’t Kill It With A Shtick...”


  • avatar
    Matthew Danda

    I’m confused. Wasn’t my lovely Ford Fusion hecho in Mexico?

  • avatar
    menno

    I just took delivery of our brand spanking new 2009 automobile. It was manufactured in the United States, with an engine manufactured in the United States; the company which built it has an engineering center in Michigan and a design studio in California, and is a highly successful auto company worldwide. In fact, it is one of only 3 brands (of which it owns 2) which has, as of the last two months, not been an epic fail in sales percentages and numbers.

    It’s a Hyundai Sonata GLS four cylinder automatic, in Cherry Red, with a black and tan interior (and gorgeous albeit fake, wood trim). 0-60 in less time than a 15 year old BMW 735i, has as much room as a same era 750iL and a huge trunk. It’s got less than 100 miles on it right now (i.e. still “tight” and not broken in) and the MPG meter portion of the trip meter says 28 mpg (it was 27 degrees F this morning on the commute – so that makes MPG suffer), so it’s efficient. It’s quiet, rides well, handles well, seems to be built well…

    And I got a 30.5% off MSRP discount on a brand new car.

    Put another way, with 0 down, we’re paying a lower payment over 5 years than we did for the purchase of a 2002 Sonata with 0 down over 6 years.

    Yes. Buy American if you can.

    This means you’ll have to escew cars like the Ford Fusion (Mexico), Chrysler 300 (Canada), Chevrolet Equinox (Canada, engine from China), etc. etc.

  • avatar

    There’s a Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep dealership in the Atlanta area that has been advertising “Be American, BUY American” for a couple of years. But then they follow that with special deals on Mexican-built PT Cruisers and Dodge Journeys and Canadian-built minivans and 300s. I laugh every time they come on.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Dr. Bruce Garretson, an ophthalmologist with offices in Royal Oak and Rochester, has bought BMWs for almost two decades. This will be the first year he will buy an American-made vehicle. “Although I prefer the way a BMW drives,” the father of two college-age sons says. “I believe that supporting Detroit is more important than my personal taste given our current economic condition.”

    Aren’t there Bimmers made in the US? Well, if Dr. Bruce wants to drive a car he doesn’t like as much to support Detroit over… wherever, I guess that’s his prerogative.

  • avatar
    no_slushbox

    America makes a lot of really great products. Why don’t people recognize those great products?

    Because the horrible products that the Detroit automakers have made in the past (or, in Chrysler’s case, continue to make in the present) have tarnished the image of American manufacturing.

  • avatar
    Rastus

    menno,

    Please keep us posted on how you like it, I’d sincerely be interested in knowing…as that just may be my next car too.

    It’s totally amazing…Hyundai many years ago set out as one of its strategic goals to SPECIFICALLY become one of the “Top 5” global automakers. At the time they were nowhere near that goal…they were pretty much starting off one notch above Tata or maybe Zastava (Yugo fame).

    Guess what? They did it.

    That’s leadership for you. And that’s what everyone has been BEGGING and PLEADING GM to do…Set a specific GOAL (!!)…and set the gears in motion to make it happen. None of this “oh, we’ll be profitable in 2012 or thereabouts” nonsense.

    Hell, you can’t even get a tangible commitment from GM. If you don’t have a goal, you have a snowballs chance in hell of ever achieving it.

  • avatar
    umterp85

    Make that 2 Bimmer defectors….I traded my 2000 325 for a 2005 Ford Mustang and 2001 X5 for a 2007 Lincoln MKX. Maybe we can find a third to respond in a similar way—-the old 3 data points makes a trend deal.

    BTW—could not be happier with my choices—when your service advisor says “not you again” like my BMW one did—I think you know why I am happier.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I can see where this trend may take off,in the areas hit hard by the layoffs and shutdowns.I just can’t it see taking root anywhere else.Not for quite some time.

    Here in Canada’s Motor City the effects are starting to hit home hard.Kind’a funny when I see a BMW in the driveway of an upscale house.The same one thats been on the market since Xmas.The same house,where the vender has dropped the price 3 times.

    The one I like best is the bar/grill around the corner.Always kept his shiny Accura tucked in a preemo parking spot out front.

    A bunch of us stopped in for beer after golf once.One of the guys questioned,Whats up with the Accura.I don’t work for the CAW and they don’t tell me what to drive,says owner/bartender.

    Fair enough,the bartender is right.His money and he makes his own decisions.We never went back there.I guess we were not the only ones.I drove by the other day.The Accura is gone and there is a for rent sign,hanging bellow the CLOSED sign.

    I’m with Fritz Henderson on this one.We can’t tell people what to drive.I watched the interview,and I thought Fritz was pretty upfront,on the buy American issue,and questions on his salary.

  • avatar
    John R

    Amazing. I can’t read that DetN article without involuntarily rolling my eyes.

  • avatar
    NickR

    If a strict buy what is assembled in here policy were implemented in Canada, it would still end up as a race between Toyota, Honda, GM, Ford, and Chrysler…just with fewer model choices.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    There’s a lot of benefit to buying local. If you want to benefit your economy, keeping money from leaving it is a really good idea.

    Of course, local does not mean American. If you’re Canadian, you’re flushing dollars out of the country if you buy a Mexican-made car with a Japanese powerplant and a chassis jointly engineered by Japanese and American designers, with profits going to Detroit (or rather, to Detroit’s debt-holders).

    By all means, buy local goods (but make sure it’s local: a lot of farmers will buy imported produce for sale at market. But don’t assume that locality has anything to do with the brand: find out where your dollar really goes, not where some marketing department tells you it does.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Here in Canada’s Motor City the effects are starting to hit home hard.Kind’a funny when I see a BMW in the driveway of an upscale house.The same one thats been on the market since Xmas.The same house,where the vender has dropped the price 3 times.

    He ought to have bought a Cambridge-built Lexus.

  • avatar
    Happy_Endings

    Even though Dr. Diane McShane of Birmingham was in the market for a used vehicle for their family car, the internist says: “My husband would not look at anything except an American car. We bought a Pacifica.”

    Wasn’t the Pacifica assembled in Windsor?

  • avatar
    mikey

    @ psarhjinian….You mean a Cambridge assembled Lexus.

    @menno..Good luck with your new car I mean that sincerely.Its a lot of cash to lay down,and be pissed off.

  • avatar
    TaurusGT500

    Ahhh…junk journalism is but one step removed junk science.

    Dr. Bruce Garretson, an ophthalmologist with offices in Royal Oak and Rochester….

    A few key words tell it all…
    …Ophthalmologist: Means he has customers he has to keep happy.

    …Office in Royal Oak and Rochester: Detroit suburbs. Heavy concentrations of D3 employees.

    Connect the dots: Love ’em or hate ’em, many of his customers are D3 employees.

    …supporting Detroit is more important than my personal taste given our current economic condition.”

    I read that as code for, “I’m not a complete moron; I know where my bread gets buttered!”

    …”If I don’t satisfy my customers they’ll go elsewhere. If I’m a bad eye doctor they’ll walk, which is fair. And in this climate if they resent the wheels I drive, they’ll walk. Maybe fair; maybe not so fair – doesn’t matter, that’s life.”

  • avatar
    John Horner

    There is nothing new under the sun.

    Check out this 1938 Buy Local propaganda film which was shown in local movie theaters back then:

    http://www.southcountybusiness.com/modules/webshow/singlelink.php?lid=22

    Interestingly enough, only one of the sponsors listed at the end is still in business; the funeral home. Weird.

  • avatar
    Geo. Levecque

    The Lexus made in Cambridge, Ontario starts with bare metal and then works its way through the Manufacturing process, I know after having toured this Factory, the seats alone are covered in Leather produced locally in Elmira, Ontario by Mennoites, on the Tour I was on, we had a retired GM worker from Oshawa, he really enjoyed seeing how Toyota and Lexus Cars are built.
    This Lexus plant is the only Lexus plant outside of Japan again a credit to Canadian Workers, I can see why the CAW members are more or less jelaous and would give there eye teeth to Unionize this Plant!

  • avatar
    mikey

    Let talk about Canada.We do not have our own car company.Unless you want to include Chrysler,between unpaid taxes,and debt,one could say we owned a chunk of them.

    Our car market is about the same as California.I read that here at TTAC somewhere.In Oshawa I believe its around 85% of production is for the US
    market.Thank you America.Having said that, remember we import a lot of cars, from where?The United States of America, thats where.May God bless them.

    I’m sincere when I ask the B&B to name the Country,that imports more American cars than Canada?Korea,Japan,Germany,the UK maybe.

    Yes the Pacifica was assembled in Windsor.
    Key word….WAS!

  • avatar
    Rhiadon

    I need to get a “Buy American” sticker for my Subaru Legacy. It would be significantly less ironic than the image above. I’ve actually had a person give me grief for not buying American before. When I asked him where he thought my car was made, he didn’t know. When I told him it was made in Lafayette, Indiana he was silent. I laughed a little on the inside.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    You mean a Cambridge assembled Lexus.

    Yes and no. The RX chassis and most of the oily bits are sourced from the US and Canada, not Japan. The Venza, it’s sister-car, is 75% domestic content, and the NAFTA rules are pretty prickly about what you can get away with calling “domestic”. And if you want a luxury car built in Canada, it’s the only choice you have, except for the similarly-domestic Lincoln MKX.

    Most Canadian cars aren’t that Canadian, regardless of where they’re assembled. About the best you can get is—wait for it, mikey!—the Impala SS, with both powertrain, parts and assembly here. After that, though, it doesn’t really make a whole lot of difference if you’re buying a 300, Flex, Edge/MKX, Corolla/Matrix, RAV or Civic.

    I’d imagine Americans have it slightly better, what with more powertrain assembly done in the US, but what constitutes domestic is more or less a wash. We’re talking 10% differences among most models.

    Now, all that said, you’re doing your community a favour by buying local. That means that mikey’s done the right thing with his Impala, but if for some reason I wanted a smaller car, or a car with a hatchback, it’d still be better to buy a Matrix than an HHR, despite being “closer” to GM Canada than TMMC.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    Geo. Levecque : The Lexus made in Cambridge, Ontario starts with bare metal and then works its way through the Manufacturing process,… …there eye teeth to Unionize this Plant!

    I’ve toured the plant as well. It is pretty impressive. I’ll also add that the engines and transmissions are assembled in the USA for the RX350. The facility that assembles both units also machines the blocks, cranks, rods, heads, cams, housings, and gears. A majority of the supplied parts (sensors, bolts, block/head/etc raw material, etc) come from US suppliers, as well. I never understood why so many people throw “assembled” out there when referring to a transplant. It isn’t like the plants receive a Tundra cab and a Tundra chassis and mount the two together claiming that it is now US built.

    On a sad note, my favorite bike frame manufacturer, Cannondale, has announced that all frames will be produced in Taiwan. There was certainly an amount of pride in the american flag and “handmade in the USA” on the frame of both of my Cdales. My roof rack faring even has a huge Cannondale sticker w/ “handmade in the USA” on it. I guess I’ll have to peel that off.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I never understood why so many people throw “assembled” out there when referring to a transplant

    Because they UAW and D3 marketing has been very successful in implying, but not outright stating, that transplants are effectively kit cars shipped from Japan.

    It’s like “the profits go to Japan”, which is another piece of marketing schtick that ignores a) that the D3 aren’t profit-sharing entities and their profits don’t really make it back into the local market, and b) they aren’t making a profit anyway.

    Both are not outright falsehoods, but lies of omission.

  • avatar
    Kevin

    Wow, how brilliant that until now the Detroit-3 have been squandering their valuable cash on non-automotive related hobbies in Detroit that car buyers don’t care about. If I had been stupid enough to be a shareholder of one of these dogs I think I’d be pissed. (Oh wait I’m a taxpayer so I guess I am a shareholder now…)

  • avatar
    rochskier

    @ Quentin:

    Thanks for the heads up on Cannondale, that is a truly disappointing development. I bought an F4 early last year, and that CAAD frame is super sweet and solid. No creaks or flex and a pure pleasure to ride.

    I have a hard time imagining that a Taiwan-made frame will approach that level of quality.

  • avatar
    TR4

    I used to work for Philips who made Magnavox, Sylvania, and Philco TV sets in Tennessee during the ’80s and ’90s. Yet a lot of the cry-baby auto workers would buy Sony, Toshiba, Sanyo, and Panasonic sets. Turnabout is fair play.

  • avatar
    erikhans

    Considering that Mexico and Canada are part of North America…you are still buying American. Also, consider (for all you people that hate Mexicans) buying a Mexican made car will keep a Mexican in Mexico.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Quentin: “On a sad note, my favorite bike frame manufacturer, Cannondale, has announced that all frames will be produced in Taiwan. There was certainly an amount of pride in the american flag and “handmade in the USA” on the frame of both of my Cdales. My roof rack faring even has a huge Cannondale sticker w/ “handmade in the USA” on it. I guess I’ll have to peel that off.”

    About 30 years ago, I bought two Raleighs… one for me and one for my wife. My bike was excellent. My wife’s bike was crap. My frame was English, hers was Taiwanese. Her frame had unbelievable amounts of flex in it; it was like pedalling spaghetti and it sucked all the power out of your effort.

    But what a difference 3 decades makes… Cannondale can now source the frames from Taiwan because they’re now very, very good.

    Still, this is a sad moment. Can’t we keep ahead in productivity? Or does Cannondale figure too few will pay extra for “Made in the USA?”

  • avatar
    moedaman

    erikhans :
    April 8th, 2009 at 12:20 pm

    Considering that Mexico and Canada are part of North America…you are still buying American. Also, consider (for all you people that hate Mexicans) buying a Mexican made car will keep a Mexican in Mexico.

    Ya right, more mexicans have flooded the USA since those plants were built than did all the decades before.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    KixStart : But what a difference 3 decades makes… Cannondale can now source the frames from Taiwan because they’re now very, very good.

    Still, this is a sad moment. Can’t we keep ahead in productivity? Or does Cannondale figure too few will pay extra for “Made in the USA?”

    I don’t doubt that the Taiwan made Cannondales will be of very high quality. I was willing to pay a little more for a US built frame because it helped my local economy (both of mine were built 60 miles from where I grew up). My most recent 29er has custom livery done by Cannondale for my university’s cycling team. I suppose that practice is gone as well.

  • avatar
    davey49

    Canada and Mexico are part of America so Fusion is OK

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Canada and Mexico are part of America so Fusion is OK

    Canada and Mexico belong to NAFTA, but no, they are not part of the United States of America.

    By your definition, Accords built in Ohio and Camrys built in Kentucky should be just fine. But I’m willing to bet that you’ll find some reason that they aren’t…

  • avatar
    ffdr4

    What makes me laugh in the Oshawa area are all those “Out of a job yet? Keep buying foreign” license plate frames on Korean built Chevy Optra’s, Epica’s, Honda engine equipped Saturn Redline’s and made in Mexico HHR’s and Avalanche’s. What makes me laugh even harder are the union workers who shop at the Walmart a short distance away from the Oshawa car plant. Proudly wearing their union mandated “Made in Canada Matters” t-shirts, their Walmart bags bristling with made in China items as they put their purchase in there vehicles. The same vehicles that have “Buy Domestic-CAW Local 222” stickers. Talk about irony.

  • avatar
    98SuperC

    “I used to work for Philips who made Magnavox, Sylvania, and Philco TV sets in Tennessee during the ’80s and ’90s. Yet a lot of the cry-baby auto workers would buy Sony, Toshiba, Sanyo, and Panasonic sets. Turnabout is fair play.”

    Lot’s of regional examples exist. I moved from Detroit to Oregon about 20 years ago and observed a lot of loggers and millworkers driving Toyota pick-ups were complaining about imported Canadian lumber without any recognition of the irony.

    People are going to act in their own self-interest (or perception of same). We need to have a consistent set of national policies that recognize and reward all participants in the production-consumption system to keep an appropriate, healthy amount of value-added activities within our society. We are giving these capabilities away and patting ourselves on the back for how idealogically pure we are.

  • avatar
    mtypex

    After you drive your Saturn Aura home tonight, turn on the TV and watch Jim Press jump out of the Fiat 500 at the NY auto show.

    Don’t do it for me. Do it for the children.

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    “Buy American” doesn’t actually mean Buy American. It means Buy UAW/CAW. Once you understand the code, the phrase makes perfect sense. Understood this way, we can see why the Subarus, Toyotas, and Hondas, BMWs, Benzs and Hyundais built in the USA do not qualify. But wouldn’t it be fun to slap those “Buy American” bumper stickers on the back of all the Routans on the dealer’s lot? (It would have to be at the dealers, because they are rarely sighted in the wild).

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    “I believe that supporting Detroit is more important than my personal taste given our current economic condition.”

    If Detroit wants to give me a car for free, I’ll be more than happy to drive around with “USA!” stickers plastered all over it, even if it was made in Mexico.

    If, on the other hand, they think they can charge me $20K, $30K, or $40K for an inferior product that I don’t even like, and I’m supposed to suck it up and buy it out of pity, sorry but I don’t think so. My favorite cars are the A6 and the Infiniti M. The only domestic alternatives, the STS and the MKS, are both garbage.

  • avatar
    DeanMTL

    I live in Montreal. In this wintery hellhole, there isn’t a damned thing that’s domestic unless we’re talking milk cartons and shitty bead jewelery. Luckily no one gives a crap around here.

    I’ll buy whatever I like. I killed myself making the money, so it’s my choice. Cayenne, here I come baby! Daddy’s comin’ home!

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Cayenne, here I come baby! Daddy’s comin’ home!

    Don’t get too excited. When that thing is in the shop (again), your loaner might just be a domestic. I do hope that you like Impalas…

  • avatar
    Bridge2far

    No matter how those with guilty conscience spin it, if you buy a Hyundai, Toyota, etc you are promoting and contributing to FOREIGN companies. Period. End of story. Want to keep your dollars at home in the US or Canada? Buy a GM, Ford, or Chrysler product. Simple. And don’t start with that “assembled at” garbage.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Want to keep your dollars at home in the US or Canada? Buy a GM, Ford, or Chrysler product. Simple.

    I guess I’m not quite sure how hiring Koreans and Mexicans to build “American” cars is “keeping dollars at home.”

    Unless South Korea became the 51st state when I wasn’t looking, I’m not sure how this could possibly be true. But hey, I don’t read the paper every day, so ya never know, I might have missed the memo.

  • avatar
    Happy_Endings

    No matter how those with guilty conscience spin it, if you buy a Hyundai, Toyota, etc you are promoting and contributing to FOREIGN companies. Period. End of story. Want to keep your dollars at home in the US or Canada? Buy a GM, Ford, or Chrysler product. Simple. And don’t start with that “assembled at” garbage.

    No matter how you want to spin it, all these companies are multi-national corporations who are going to spend their money where they want. Their want to grow the company and will invest in places they think are going to best help themselves, no matter what locale that is. Why are all these companies investing heavily in India and China? Because they think they can make money there. Why are Toyota, Honda, and others building factories in Canada and the United States? Because they think they can make money here.

    They don’t have loyalty to the country they are headquartered in. Their loyalty to their bottom line.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    No matter how you want to spin it, all these companies are multi-national corporations who are going to spend their money where they want. Their want to grow the company and will invest in places they think are going to best help themselves, no matter what locale that is. Why are all these companies investing heavily in India and China? Because they think they can make money there. Why are Toyota, Honda, and others building factories in Canada and the United States? Because they think they can make money here.

    They don’t have loyalty to the country they are headquartered in. Their loyalty to their bottom line.

    You should bottle that and sell it. A succinct and completely accurate response.

    Some folks don’t understand the concept of the multinational corporation. The address where the CEO’s mail goes is pretty irrelevant these days. Global capital knows no borders.

  • avatar
    dkulmacz

    Kevin: “Wow, how brilliant that until now the Detroit-3 have been squandering their valuable cash on non-automotive related hobbies in Detroit that car buyers don’t care about. If I had been stupid enough to be a shareholder of one of these dogs I think I’d be pissed. (Oh wait I’m a taxpayer so I guess I am a shareholder now…)”

    Either you’re joking, or you’ve done your part to show the true colors I’m afraid are all-too-evident with many posters here.

    So contributing to charities like United Way, or donating to the arts is “sqandering valuable cash on non-automotive related hobbies”?

    Are you actually slagging them because they support their communities and give to charity?

    I’m afraid that it’s probably not that unusual a sentiment with the ‘usual crowd’ here.

  • avatar
    Bridge2far

    “Why are Toyota, Honda, and others building factories in Canada and the United States? Because they think they can make money here.”
    And they are. At the expense of the domestics I might add. But who cares as long as it’s all in the mutinational pursuit of profits?

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Quentin: “On a sad note, my favorite bike frame manufacturer, Cannondale, has announced that all frames will be produced in Taiwan. There was certainly an amount of pride in the american flag and “handmade in the USA” on the frame of both of my Cdales. My roof rack faring even has a huge Cannondale sticker w/ “handmade in the USA” on it. I guess I’ll have to peel that off.”

    About 30 years ago, I bought two Raleighs… one for me and one for my wife. My bike was excellent. My wife’s bike was crap. My frame was English, hers was Taiwanese. Her frame had unbelievable amounts of flex in it; it was like pedalling spaghetti and it sucked all the power out of your effort….

    I had a Raleigh Record 10 speed in late 1970’s. When I stood up on the pedals. the frame groaned loudly. The rear centre pull brake mounting bar tore off the frame. But in fairness, I beat the shit out of it. In fact, in my mind I had invented the modern mountain bike. Too bad I had no way to develop that idea. I am so unhappy about Cannondale moving production out of the US. So, I guess I own my last Cannondale, just like I stopped buying K2 skis when they abandoned Colorado for China. Latest skis are Rossi’s made in France. There is no reason for this kind of move, except for the ownership to jam just a little bit of extra profit into their pocket. No wonder America is going down the toilet, which, if it is “American” Standard, it is likely to be Mexican made. America is stupid and we deserve what we are getting. Buying a BMW is one thing, but giving up specialty markets where the US label meant quality is another.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    But who cares as long as it’s all in the mutinational pursuit of profits?

    Well, you obviously don’t care. Somehow in your universe, a Chrysler built in Mexico = good, yet a Honda built in Ohio by American labor = bad.

    You claim to care about American jobs, yet you’d rather see a guy in Kentucky lose his job so a Korean can take his place. Unless you happen to be a stockholder in GM or F, or a partner in the Cerberus fund, there’s just a logical disconnect that needs to be exposed for what it is.

  • avatar
    Bridge2far

    ” You claim to care about American jobs, yet you’d rather see a guy in Kentucky lose his job so a Korean can take his place.”
    Unfortunately, this is a simplistic narrow minded response. Once again, please refer to the PARENT companies. This is not hard.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Unfortunately, this is a simplistic narrow minded response. Once again, please refer to the PARENT companies.

    We did. You haven’t demonstrated why the HQ address is allegedly of particular relevance to this discussion.

    Perhaps Toyota should get a Detroit PO box, so you’ll be placated. If it’s all about ZIP codes, Mailboxes Etc. should be able to fix that.

  • avatar
    mcs

    Quentin: On a sad note, my favorite bike frame manufacturer, Cannondale, has announced that all frames will be produced in Taiwan.

    Some of the best bikes in the world are still made in the US. US made bikes like the Parlee Cycles Z1 are second to none. An example of attracting buyers to a product because of it’s superiority rather than trying to shame them into buying it.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    breidge2far: “No matter how those with guilty conscience spin it, if you buy a Hyundai, Toyota, etc you are promoting and contributing to FOREIGN companies. Period. End of story.”

    No matter how those with economic fealty or blind loyalty to the D3 spin it, if I buy a Honda, Toyota, et, I am doing it to promote and contribute to the contents of MY DOMESTIC wallet. Period. End of story.

    bridge2far: “Want to keep your dollars at home in the US or Canada? Buy a GM, Ford, or Chrysler product. Simple. And don’t start with that “assembled at” garbage.”

    Want to keep your dollars at home in your wallet? Buy the best value you can. Simple. And don’t start with that “foreign car” crap.

  • avatar
    FrustratedConsumer

    We did. You haven’t demonstrated why the HQ address is allegedly of particular relevance to this discussion.

    Because the sub-text of these ‘Buy American’ zealots was pointed out earlier. It really means ‘Buy Union and save my VEBA.’

    I do feel for these retirees, that inexplicably trusted these corporations with their future. I guess it was a different time, a different era. If I found myself in their shoes, I’d likely scream ‘Buy American’ right along with them. (As absurd as the idea is…)

  • avatar
    Quentin

    mcs : Some of the best bikes in the world are still made in the US. US made bikes like the Parlee Cycles Z1 are second to none. An example of attracting buyers to a product because of it’s superiority rather than trying to shame them into buying it.

    Those are certainly beautiful frames!

    Cannondale had a great brand image going. Very innovative w/ the Lefty and living hinge, designed in the US, and built in the US. I’m not saying this is my last Cannondale. When you toss out something I really like about the brand, I might shop elsewhere next time.

    The next vehicle I plan on buying is manufactured 3 hrs away (as well as the engine machining and assy) and the transmission is machined and assembled 5 minutes away. It isn’t a domestic manufacturer, but it puts a lot more money back in my local economy than buying the domestic branded competitor that is built in Ontario and isn’t available w/ a higher fuel economy 4cyl. The first criteria for choosing the vehicle, though, was the fact that it best fit my needs. It is practical, reliable, economical, and comfortable.

  • avatar
    Bridge2far

    “Perhaps Toyota should get a Detroit PO box, so you’ll be placated. If it’s all about ZIP codes, Mailboxes Etc. should be able to fix that.”
    If Toyota vacated Japan entirely and re organized as a US corporation that would be an altogether differnt situation. Your PO box argument is alarmingly uninformed.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    If Toyota vacated Japan entirely

    OK, humor me here. I’d like to have a cogent explanation of what exactly is wrong with operating a business in Japan. Again, I’m a bit behind on my current events, but I heard a rumor that World War II ended about 64 years ago.

    While you sort out the answer to that one, here are a couple more companies for you to boycott:

    http://www.ford.co.jp/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=DFY/JP

    http://www.tokyo.ccbc.co.jp/

  • avatar

    Ummm bridg2far haven’t you previously posted that you sell cars for a living?

    Which brand is that by the way?

  • avatar

    no_slushbox :
    April 8th, 2009 at 9:08 am

    America makes a lot of really great products. Why don’t people recognize those great products?

    Because American elites and those who aspire to be so have always looked down on their own country. We’re just a bunch of knuckledragging bumpkins compared to the sophisticated Europeans. People buy European appliances because they are fashionable, not because Braun makes a better washing machine than Whirlpool.

    Likewise, in NYC and LA, it’s unfashionable for tastemongers to be seen in something so proletarian as a Chevy or Ford.

    Hence you have folks saying “nobody buys American cars anymore” even though the domestics hold half of the market share.

  • avatar

    It isn’t a domestic manufacturer, but it puts a lot more money back in my local economy than buying the domestic branded competitor that is built in Ontario and isn’t available w/ a higher fuel economy 4cyl.

    So when a Canadian buys a Canadian built Honda, in part to spend his money locally, that’s cool, but if a Detroit doctor decides to buy a Cadillac for the same reason he’s an idiot.

    Whenever possible I shop at Durst Lumber, in Berkley, MI, instead of Lowe’s or Home Depot. The money mostly stays local and I have a prayer of selling the Durst’s some embroidered apparel, whereas I have no chance of selling stuff to the big box stores.

  • avatar
    Bridge2far

    Which brand is that by the way?
    I’ll be happy to “come clean”.

    Chevrolet, Pontiac, Buick, GMC and Cadillac.

    You could rightfully say that I have a pony in this race…

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