By on January 31, 2009

My step-daughter Sasha and I had a little chin-wag this morning. After debating my potential car “needs” with her in private, it struck me that TTAC’s Best and Brightest might want to hear an 11-year-old’s perspective on high end automobiles. As egghead pistonheads, we often forget the basic appeal of our wheels, and how people outside the autoblogosphere view the apples of our collective eye. So I present my interview with Sash, and invite you to share your progeny’s thoughts about cars in general, your cars in particular and dream machines. [NB: I know the Estoque doesn’t have scissor doors. More’s the pity.]

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22 Comments on “Podcast: Branding is Genetic...”


  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Kid has good taste. Wonder what she’d say if she was driving.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    “It’s SO ugly!” “Oh my god it’s so ugly”

    LMAO!

  • avatar
    1981.911.SC

    Great ploy for a little nepotism…Ha ha ha What do you pay per PodCast? At least she says Porsche correctly. Does she help change oil….hell am I the only one who changes my own oil??
    BTW A GTI is way too fast for a 1st car.

  • avatar
    tom

    She’s right. Why would anyone replace a Boxter with an IS-F?

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    They do like 7 hours of polishing the paint or like 7 layers or whatever… of course the LS is super shiny!!

  • avatar

    Well, she does have good aesthetic taste. But what is it with kids and having a TV in the car. I did three x-country trips by the time I was 8, and two months of touring Europe by car when I had just turned 13. I pretty much had my eyes glued to the scenery most of the time. Also, it was concentrated family time, which was not in huge supply since my father was a work all the time academic while I was growing up.

    I do remember though, as a kid, how important the inside of the car was in a general way, and separately from the outside and the driving dynamics.

    Anyway, that podcast was well worth it. Thanks to both of you.

  • avatar
    chuckR

    I usually don’t listen to podcasts, but that was delightful. My daughter’s criteria for a car also included a heavy weighting on ‘pretty’ (for a small sedan). We wound up with the last year A4 before the big mouth bass nose was introduced.

    What are you going to do when Sasha asks to drive the Boxster?

  • avatar
    Sola77

    Tell it like it is … A kids perspective/reality is very refreshing (and entertaining). I was a bit awestruck with Sasha’s all or nothing approach to a first car, what principles! The rent a car idea is a masterstroke of cunning sensibilities, reminded me of Enzo Ferrari methodically dividing his selection of automobile ownership between Alfa, Fiat, and IIRC Lancia, to avoid any ‘political consequences’ and labeling.

  • avatar
    solbeam

    Two ugly Insects heads up!:
    http://www.imagebam.com/image/5f320725116216
    ;)

  • avatar
    Runfromcheney

    David Holzman:
    I was exactly the way she was when I was her age. I was always in the back, and had no say over anything. So I would always like the large luxury cars that you give more priority to the people in the back then in the front, since I was always stuck in the back. I would have loved to have been able to watch a movie, change the climate controls, or change the radio.

    Now that I am 16 and driving myself around, I have different tastes. I like cars that art practical, sensible, and that are fun to drive. That is why I love my 93 Ford Escort Wagon. It is a worn down piece of crap, but I like it. It is great in the turns, it is very fun to drive, and is very mechanically simple, making it very easy to repair. It is an excellent car to learn auto repair on. On top of that, parts are very cheap and plentiful, and since there are Escorts just like mine piled up to the gates at the local junkyard, I can get any cosmetic part I want/need for next to nothing. The indestructible 1.9 engine and its accompanying Mazda mechanicals don’t hurt either.

    And I agree with her on “whats the point of buying a new car?” For the foreseeable future, I just plan on cycling through cheap, old cars and driving them until they die. Since I am studying to be an auto mechanic, they fit perfectly into my lifestyle. When my Escort croaks, I would really like to get an old Caravan or Taurus…

    You raise your kids well Robert. I wish there were more tweens like her walking this earth, instead of the airheads that I see around my parts.

  • avatar

    Interesting perspective from your daughter, back when GM was dominant their cars were renowned for being rolling living rooms in decor and interior size and near silence and isolation in driving. Although auto enthusiasts may not prefer cars that way its interesting that those traits may be intrinsically desirable to the vast middle of the market.

  • avatar
    jayparry

    GET CLOSE TO THE MICROPHONE KID! SCHNAUZERS! GET AWAY FROM THE MICROPHONE!

  • avatar
    dolo54

    I love that she refuses to be led. Good to hear a kid’s perspective. Oh, and bad dog!

  • avatar
    Samir

    When are you going to interview Lola?

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    She’s smarter than 99% of the commenters on Autoblog. Also a few years older.

  • avatar
    tom

    She’s smarter than 99% of the commenters on Autoblog. Also a few years older.

    Lol, totally agree…I’ve recently looked through some comments on Autoblog…well, let’s just say that it was a mistake to even engage in that sort of encounter.

    Most of these guys surely have never driven any car. In fact, they sound like me when I was 8 years old.

  • avatar
    HarveyBirdman

    Great interview; had me smiling for most of the 10 minutes. I couldn’t help but think, though, of how few 11-year-old girls don’t know cars at all, and it made me wonder how much you’ve rubbed off on her. At the very least, Sasha’s obviously been affected by having a Boxster in the garage. And I’m 34 and I’ve still never managed to ride in either a Boxster or in the back seat of a Lexus LS600hL. Sasha’s definitely got the makings of an enthusiast, currently coupled with the aesthetic sensibilities of an 11-year-old girl.

    Thanks for the fun podcast.

  • avatar
    the duke

    “well, I wouldn’t want it to be pink all the time, because if I wasn’t wearing pink it wouldn’t match my outfit.”

    Totally awesome! She may be 11, but she’s still a girl. But thanks for the post, that was funny, and she’s spot on regarding the IS-F and Panamera (have to disagree on the Rapide).

    My .02, avoid the old waterwagons for a first car (I know I’ll offend some VW nut, but I’m not a fan). She likes the Boxster, so how about one of the last mid-engine MR2 convertibles? They should be getting cheaper now.

  • avatar

    Sasha reminded me why I loved big American barges when I was her age…and why I choose to never grow up.

    (muttering)
    Stupid three-letter luxury cars from GM and Ford
    (/muttering)

    Thanks Sash, you’re all-righty in my book.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Harvey, it’s actually pretty easy to get a ride in a Boxster if you’re 34, go to a dealer and ask for a test drive.

    As for first cars, a Civic or Mazda3 would be much better choices than a GTI.

  • avatar
    CAHIBOstep

    While riding in the back seat of my Dad’s various Lincolns as a kid, I wanted my first car to be an ambulance.

    For whatever that’s worth.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    From the mouths of babes…

    Seriously, Farago.

    When you were on about the IS-F, I was alright with that. Not that I want one – a glorified Corolla with a big engine and handling package.

    But, if you like it, go for it.

    But to trade a Boxster for a 4-door compromise? C’mon. The Lexus will never be as sharp, or as beautiful, or as satisfying. Sure, your Toyota will have a back seat for the kids — but the kid has already said…meh.

    Keep the Boxster. Purity of purpose. Clarity of execution. Don’t swap it for a glorified compact because it’s got a crappy little backseat. If you do, you’ll regret it after your first solo drive through the twisties. Not as good. Not as fun. And now you have room for the schnauzers and kids in back. Even less fun.

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