By on January 19, 2008

gm-dimensional-for-print.jpgWhenever TTAC publishes a less than flattering review of a domestic nameplate, fans of the brand (or model) accuse us of being "import bigots" or "biased." So I went through our rated reviews and broke them down by nameplate (regardless of country of origin). The average rating (rounded to two decimals) for domestic brands: 3.17 stars. So-called imports: 3.43 stars. Three five-star imports are out of the reach of mere mortals (Gallardo, 911 Turbo and AMG CL63), so I took those out and re-calculated the import score; it dropped to 3.35. If you round any of these scores to star ratings, domestics average three stars and imports average, you guessed it, three stars. Taking it one step further (I gotta get a life!), 23 percent of the imports reviewed received ratings lower than three stars; only 17 percent of the domestics fell into that category.

I didn't crunch the numbers for editorials. Suffice it to say, TTAC's been critical of The Big 2.8, Toyota, Lexus, Porsche, Jaguar and the entire Chinese auto industry. If someone in this industry is doing something dumb, we're going to point it out. Period. As for our Detroit Death Watches, they cover the most important automotive story of our time; a story that's been largely ignored or improperly analyzed by the majority of the mainstream media. If that makes us "import bigots" or "anti-whatever," then so be it. TTAC's going to continue exposing the truth, wherever we find it. [NB: you are free to discuss TTAC's editorial stance or style in this post without restriction, within reason. If you know what I mean…] 

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40 Comments on “The Truth About TTAC’s “Import Bias”...”


  • avatar
    jaje

    For some the truth hurts. If it does they can choose to not visit this site and live in a fluffy cloud like Lutz – far removed from reality.

    Here’s a big reality a lot of people and companies ignore. If everything around you is in shambles – maybe your part of the problem and not soley a victim. Let’s say you handed out loans to those who just can’t pay them (or mortgaged their house to the top on the realty bubble) just to offload vehicles you are building that no one wants b/c you don’t listen to the customers and instead design by committee and Lutz, and these vehicles tend to guzzle gas in the coming reality of rising gas prices when your import competition took off their reading glasses (short term) and instead focused on high fuel mileage cars and designed them for the customers. Sorry but when you boil it all down to an analysis using occam’s razor – the Big 2.8s stupidity put them in this situation – not the world.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I read TTAC because you guys are critical when a product calls for it, no matter who makes it. That’s far to rare in the American auto media. Nobody wants to be Dan Neil and lose an advertiser.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Nothing beats measurements for injecting a measure of rationality into a controversy. Thanks, Frank.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    General Motors, Ford and Chrysler are near financial collapse because they made shortsighted decisions. They built uninteresting automobiles, failed to develop new engines and transmissions, worried more about Wall Street than design and engineering, allowed quality to lapse, mistreated customers and made costly union concessions.

    The Detroit-3 kept Wall Street happy by deferring research and development to inflate profits. When the unions demanded large pay increases they increased pensions and retiree health benefits knowing the bill would not come due for decades. Now the piper has to be paid.

    Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Mercedes and BMW operate nonunion North American plants. All are profitable because they design and build quality products consumers want to buy at prices that yield profits.

  • avatar
    morbo

    I know it would be too much work, but it’d be interesting to see review’s averaged out by vehicle country of assembly or part content. American assembled Honda’s, Suburu’s and Mitsubishi’s versus Mexican/Canadian Ford’s, Chevy’s and whatever hole of ignominy that Chrysler’s slither out of.

  • avatar
    mistercopacetic

    The reason why I keep coming back to TTAC is not because I agree with the reviewers, but because of the writing–by people who seem to know what they are talking about, but aren’t necessarily selling you something. Now that I think about it I probably disagree with at least 1/3 to 1/2 of what I read in the reviews. If you want mindless affirmation of your own opinions, the entire internet awaits. Keep TTAC independent!

  • avatar
    Genez

    The problem that Detroit faces… is that they are in their own country. So, they needed to make every day hum drum cars for everyday use. For many people who just want transportation.

    What we see imported from Europe is NOT their everyday cars. We only get to see the cream of the crop. Unfair to want the domestics to have all domestics compared on the same level.

    European roads in parts have bends and twists (ancient paved over horse cart trails at times) that REQUIRE a suspension that takes turns that American cars on our straight roads with milder bends would not demand. So? What Europe has designed out of necessity becomes a desired goal for cars over here, because the sensation of a suspension that is able to take hair pin turns is more pleasurable. Fine. Let’s work towards that. But, let’s not kill ourselves with criticism because our original design parameters did not call for it.

    The critics of American cars seem to be by nature sensation seekers. And, the foreign competition has noticed what the reviewers lust for. Not all cars in Europe are great cars. Many are not. Their every day cars would not excite us. But, our everyday cars have now been pitted by our critics against the very best Europe has to offer. And, the American companies are being hurt by misplaced criticism because some rich boys want their toys who review cars.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I actually did this last night. I hoped to leave some great comment about it, but you’ve beat me to it.

    Anyway, when I did it, I broke things down by GM, Toyota Motor Group, Ford/Lincoln/Mercury, F/L/M with Mazda and Volvo added in, Nissan/Infiniti, and the Chrysler Corporation.

    I didn’t think it was worth it to include German, Italian, “English”, or Korean companies, as it seems claims of import bias really mean “You think Toyota and Honda are the best automatically.” Additionally, with the unpleasantness between Subaru, BMW, and TTAC- it would be hard for a commenter to say that TTAC is biased towards either of them.

    I couldn’t really include Honda because they only had three cars with star ratings. (all have 4-stars). Same type of thing with Mitsubishi. They only have one 2-star review.

    Unfortunately, some reviews don’t have star ratings. This includes things like the very negative xB review, or the very positive Explorer review, which may have brought the averages closer.

    In cars with a “Take-Two” review I only counted one score by averaging the two scores together. This meant I only counted the CTS and Enclave once, with the Enclave receiving a 3.5, and the CTS receiving a 4..

    Here’s what I came up with using my methods:

    GM (includes Saab): 3.1
    Toyota Motor Company: 3.375
    Ford/Lincoln/ Mercury: 3.14
    Ford/Lincoln/Mercury/Volvo/Mazda: 3.54
    Nissan/Infiniti: 3.6
    Chrysler Group: 3

  • avatar
    dastanley

    As long as you guys at TTAC call it like you see it, then it is what it is. I wouldn’t be so exasperated at GM if they were honestly trying to pull themselves out of the mud, but as long as GM remains as clueless and arrogant as they’ve been in the past, my best protest to them is to not buy their products.

    Unfortunately, I’m not hurting Wag and Lutz – I’m hurting the assembly line workers in the USA that depend on every sale to make a living. Wag, Lutz, and all the other golden parachuted pretty boys and gals are protected. And they’ve essentially already taken their ball from the USA playground and gone home. They’re all about China now, that is until the Chinese have pumped and dumped them. But if and when GM fails, it’s never upper management’s fault, it’s the damn UAW and those pesky US consumers’ fault for not being obedient enough and buying their crap. The excuses are all ready.

    As a veteran, I want to buy American (whatever that means anymore), so I bought a Toyota built in KY.

  • avatar

    It is my belief that most (but not all) of the claims of bias come from employees of either the former big three, their suppliers or employees of their dealers. When any person has a monetary interest involved it tends to skew their views.

    I would make the claim that it is they the critics of TTAC and its readership that are biased.

    I note that RLJ something who made the claim mentioned by Robert was a Ford employee. Nothing wrong with that. Harking back to the 1000 plus post on the Phil Ressler editorial (going by memory) RLJ either bemoaned the fact that people weren’t jumping ship from the Camry to the Fusion in droves since Ford finally had a competitive product or he was predicting they would shortly. I disagreed I simply asked him how that differed from the F150 vs Tundra. Up until then he simply failed to see that people satisfied with a brand generally stick with the same brand regardless of whether it is a Toyota or a Ford.

    Those working for the Detroit 3 simply have a skewed view. Unfortunately it is the customer that is always right.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    I wrote this in response to the ‘Car Up Front is a Toyota’ podcast.

    I think it may be far more relevant here. Hope you enjoy it.

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/podcasts/daily-podcast-the-car-in-front-is-a-toyota/comment-page-3/#comments

  • avatar
    raast

    I figure I have one of the best shots at objective auto commentary when I view here. I do NOT beleive all the ad copy because it’s just that, ad copy. I can recall some publication naming the Dodge Omni “Car of the Year” many years back, and then enjoying immensly the CU review that among other things (defects were legion, forget about the yawing instability issue) the horn that tooted in cadence with the blinker. Today I visited a dealer for emission testing, and they happened to have one sample of the much touted new Malibu. Now if I believed the reviews and press, I would have been in for much more of a letdown than I was. I don’t always agree with what’s said here, but the “import bias” labelling is certainly overstated, in my opinion.

  • avatar
    EJ

    I’d like to take the opportunity to compliment Robert Farago and all the team of TTAC.
    Thank you for straight talk and amusement.

    In the end the truth wins!

  • avatar
    Terry

    Ive seen this “bias” MANY times in the aol GM/Ford sites.
    Unless you are a lemming-like cheerleader then you must surely be a devil-incarnate basher. There is simply no middle ground. “Youre either with us or against us” is how I see the posts.
    To which I say…”FINE!!! The NEW AMERICAN CAR INDUSTRY is all about who is building plants and employing people in THIS country. That lets the big 2.8 out RIGHT NOW.
    Soon it’s going to be “It’s more patriotic to buy your import from Ford or GM than to buy your import from “Those Other Guys”.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Terry, what do you expect when you’re visiting a site dedicated to GM or Ford? You’ll see the same ‘bias’ when you visit a site dedicated to products made by Toyota, Honda, Mitsubishi, Volkswagen, Acura, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Subaru, Suzuki…etc.

    What I want to know is how many TTAC articles have a comment critical of Detroit even when the topic itself is not critical? You can talk about lemming-like behavior all you want, but when an article about censors pulling a newspaper ad degenerates into snide remarks about reliability, or you’re reading about a ‘crappy’ GM in an article describing a chronic scofflaw (that never even mentions what vehicle she was driving), you really have to wonder who’s the lemming here?

  • avatar
    Terry

    Quasi, I expect people to talk like adults and discuss the good points of their products, along with what is lacking and what it would take to regain market share.
    Instead, I read that ALL Toyota engines sludge, The Tundra is the worst truck ever built, ALL the profit from the import transplants go back to Japan, that all that’s wrong with GM/Ford is the UAW, the consumer, EPA laws, in short everything but where the real problems lie.
    Basically I see investors and employees lashing out trying to defend an indefensible position that “their company” has put them in through basic mismanagement.
    And questioning or asking for further clarification of a statement warrants basher status.
    I expect a calm, open, and honest discussion. Is that too much to ask?

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Terry, what do you expect when you’re visiting a site dedicated to GM or Ford? You’ll see the same ‘bias’ when you visit a site dedicated to products made by Toyota, Honda, Mitsubishi, Volkswagen, Acura, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Subaru, Suzuki…etc.

    The key difference is that the import fanboys are typically (overly) enthusiastic about the products themselves, while the Big 2.8 cheerleaders rap themselves in a xenophobic flag. They are often blatant racists, showing some degree of hatred for Asian people. More often than not, it’s not just about cars.

    That’s an abuse of patriotism, and I draw the line at ugly, nasty appeals to man’s worst instincts. And it doesn’t help their cause that the cars that they defend aren’t often all that great, either.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Pch101:
    The fanboys I’ve seen are enthusiastic about where the product is made. I’ve seen them proudly explain why a Honda manufactured in Japan is higher quality than one made in Ohio, for example.

    Terry:
    Not much to ask at all, but when every Ford article is reduced to swipes about burning Pintos, Panthers, and spontaneously combusting F150’s, and every GM Deathwatch article seems to have an angry tirade about a brand new Lumina that had parts falling off of it only a few miles after they pulled out the dealer’s lot and how they’ll never EVER as much as look at a GM product again, how much of a calm, open, and honest discussion are you really going to have? The only times I’ve seen comments about Toyota engines with sludge is in an attempt to counter the claim of rock-solid Toyota reliability. Meanwhile, every deathwatch article degenerates into a dogpile of criticism about reliability, even though I haven’t seen RF write a DW about quality issues for long time.

  • avatar
    Terry

    Quasi, I guess for some it’s easier to try to make the competition look bad than to make your team look better. Even when both sides have engineering and financial ties to each other.

  • avatar
    musah

    I’m compelled to ask frank. Is it that TTAC Is an Easy target just like the prius

  • avatar

    The best thing TTAC can do is to be critical, where criticism is due. The best thing the car companies can do for themselves is listen (yeah, I know I’m dreaming, but I can dream, can’t I?).

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The fanboys I’ve seen are enthusiastic about where the product is made. I’ve seen them proudly explain why a Honda manufactured in Japan is higher quality than one made in Ohio, for example.

    There are some who believe that the Japanese plants generate better product than the US plants. While the data I see leads me to a different conclusion, that’s not an example of “bias.”

    I see a lot of desire to find “bias”, but no tangible examples of how this supposedly manifests itself. It seems to me that the domestic fanboys just can’t accept the idea that their favorite brands do not lead the market in R&D, sex appeal or reliability.

    Because they can’t accept it, they make excuses, instead. Unfortunately, one can build an assembly line’s worth of excuses, but nobody is compelled to buy them.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Quasimondo: “… and how they’ll never EVER as much as look at a GM product again…”

    The fanboy reaction to this is, universally, that the former GM owner is being unfair and should reconsider. Sorry. Where I work, if someone stops buying OUR products, we worry about how we screwed up, we don’t accuse the former customer of being unfair. It’s our job to win him back, not to berate him until he changes his mind.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    I’m not sure where Genez is from, but on either coast and all up and down the rockies we need cars that can turn. I think part of the problem with the way US cars “handle” (I still can’t believe they put a “live” axle in the new Mustang) is that US manufacturers are based in Michigan. From the not inconsiderable time I have spent there I have observed that there are no hills and not a single curved road in the whole state. Every road is dead straight, the only turns you have to make are at intersections. Maybe if they were based in Pittsburgh or Sacramento they would realize that sometimes cars have to make turns from a speed greater than 0 mph.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    KixStart, the question is how does such a rant find its way into a deathwatch article about their bad brand management strategy? What is the point of ranting about quality in an old Malibu when an article is discussing the product launch and supply miscues of the new Malibu? I don’t think it’s that hard to stay relevant about Cerebus’ ‘strip-n-flip’ operation of Chrysler without going off on some tangent about a Dodge Omni that never ran, is it?

    Must every article reflexively turn to quality when that’s not the focus of the discussion?

  • avatar
    jaje

    I’ve all to often had run ins with the die hard Big 2.8 supporters who true colors come out when they start throwing around “Nazi” or “Jap”. That generation is slowly disappearing as a new generations replace them – but they are still around and still poison some of their young.

  • avatar
    BKW

    The shared GM/Toyota NUMMI assembly plant located in Fremont CA is a union shop.

  • avatar
    johnny ro

    Live axle in mustang? This is not an accident. They have IRS for mustang on the shelf, you can get it from Ford last time I read a Mustang article and retrofit yourself. Cost I think 5k$ retail where it would be a few hundred if already included.

    Ford decided after financial and market analysis that the lower cost/performance product point on the matrix resulting from using live axle was desirable because enough mustang buyers don’t want to pay the extra for IRS that it would cost Ford to execute. This was what the ford guy told the magazine guy. I think they are maximising revenue at cost of soul and desirable identity. I wont look back.

    What they failed to factor in is the disgust factor. Who among people who like cars can look seriously at Ford when they do stuff like this?

    I look at Solstice and think kind of cool daring fresh lines for the first time in so long from GM and I am really glad they tried but I know whats under the skin and I dont want to get within ten feet of that sucker. Solstice’ good effect is that I will at least even monitor from a distance their evolving products, having ignored them for 20 years.

    I can afford a nice car and want more than they think I want, and if I couldn’t afford I would not be looking at GM/Ford anyway except maybe for loss generating cobalt and focus.

    The Japanese way is decide if IRS is warranted in the design brief and if so then design it to the right cost. This includes US manufactured products. Europeans, you don’t get free stuff there but they seem to have a higher expectation of what a car will do and feel like. No Japan and Europe are not perfect but come on.

    My step-mom drives a black convertible new generation mustang with the v8 auto, she cant really drive, she gas/brakes and wobbles along fearfully, says she loves the car and “dont I look good in it?” Makes her feel glamorous, a carefree gal in an impractical, fun car. I drove it once, nice sound from too-large motor, it hops and skips horribly at WOF. The opposite of refined. People did wave though. Is this what Ford wants mustang to be?

    UAW? Mgt made promises it could not afford. Look at New Process Gear in the news now. Another US plant tanking due to silly high costs for non-college educated labor. They get plenty of people wanting to work for the tier 2 wage, except those who are locked in to tier 1 and wont go away.

    Finally TTAC is great, including forum people, but for a print car rag Autoweek is a fun little 15 minute experience. They also say what is good and bad and do it in a nice way.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Quasimondo: “What is the point of ranting about quality in an old Malibu when an article is discussing the product launch and supply miscues of the new Malibu?”

    The point is, the Malibu has baggage. GM is running a hundred yard dash with an opponent who has a 75-yard lead. They have twin goals:

    Keep the current customers.
    Win over some former customers.

    The echoes of bad quality continue to keep the former customers at bay. IF the current quality of GM products is equal to Toyonda, that’s good but many of these former customers were driven away for cause, are likely perfectly happy with their current Toyonda and are unlikely to make the effort to reconsider GM products. Like me. I am in no hurry; I find my current Toyondas perfectly satisfactory.

    The current customers (and remember that a significant chunk of the American market WILL NOT CONSIDER purchasing an Asian car AT ALL) can still be pissed off and driven away. That’s product availability.

    To regain market share (and their cost structure requires this), GM MUST get both sides right. Product Availability and Echoes of Quality Problems go hand-in-hand.

    As for “rants,” except for the strangely stimulating Jurisb, there seem to me to be no regualar “ranters” here “ranting” about Toyonda supremacy. Just because you don’t like something, doesn’t mean it’s a rant. If someone’s personal GM history is unpleasant, that doesn’t mean it’s a rant; it’s a challenge to GM.

    Even a die-hard Toyonda fanatic would benefit from a strong GM with strong, desireable, available, durable and reliable products: it would help hold the line on Toyonda pricing.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Ford decided after financial and market analysis that the lower cost/performance product point on the matrix resulting from using live axle was desirable because enough mustang buyers don’t want to pay the extra for IRS that it would cost Ford to execute. This was what the ford guy told the magazine guy. I think they are maximising revenue at cost of soul and desirable identity. I wont look back.

    What they failed to factor in is the disgust factor. Who among people who like cars can look seriously at Ford when they do stuff like this?

    I can, when I see enthusiasts of the previous generation Mustang Cobra swapping out the IRS rear ends for live axles. Why? Because the IRS is horrible for drag racing. What do most Mustang enthusiasts do with their car? They drag race them. That is who Ford is catering to. Does it make business sense to build a car that doesn’t cater to their core buyer?

    I look at Solstice and think kind of cool daring fresh lines for the first time in so long from GM and I am really glad they tried but I know whats under the skin and I dont want to get within ten feet of that sucker. Solstice’ good effect is that I will at least even monitor from a distance their evolving products, having ignored them for 20 years.

    What’s under the skin that we don’t know about?

  • avatar
    monteclat

    Anyone accusing this or any site of being import biased should check out comparison reviews from edmunds.com (or any other site) to see where domestic ranks (usually near the bottom).

  • avatar
    FromBrazil

    I don’ think TTAC has any foreign bias. I think you guys tell it like it is. I mean, most of the writers are clearly car enthusiasts. With all the good and bad that comes with that. Yeah, we all want more hp and handling, but going along and doing daily chores, commuting all we really need is an appliance. And as appliances go the Asians are usully better. Would you prefer a Sony or a Phillips? So, we are not talking high-end products. In this case probably going European is better. So, what’s left for Americans? you just have to improve (disclosure: I’m a Ford guy. Usually like the style of their cars and think that in our market they’re perfectly suitable and competitive. However, GM is another story. Never liked their cars and thy insist on hoisting on us technology from the 80s” C’mon, gmme a break)

  • avatar
    Redbarchetta

    quasimondo :I can, when I see enthusiasts of the previous generation Mustang Cobra swapping out the IRS rear ends for live axles. Why? Because the IRS is horrible for drag racing. What do most Mustang enthusiasts do with their car? They drag race them. That is who Ford is catering to. Does it make business sense to build a car that doesn’t cater to their core buyer?

    I remember reading about their decision to use a live rear axle in the Mustang for drag race and cost reasons before the car came out, and the Cobra got the IRS for performance reason. I questioned this wondering exactly how many people that plan to drag race the car buy a NEW musting each year. I don’t know the exact number but I’m guessing they sold 140,000 Mustangs last year. Even if they make up 50% of sales that’s 70,000 people racing them, even with illegal racing that seams like a very high number each year.

    To me it seams like they are catering to a small sector of the market at the expense of better handling for the majority of the market.

    Maybe Frank can tell us how many were sold in 2007.

  • avatar
    Andy D

    uhhmn, the average Mustang driver needs a live rear axle about as much as the average SUV owner needs 4wd. Or a bimmer driver needs paddle shifters.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    I also would have thought the import bias idea was silly until reading the new Nissan coupe review. The text of the review describes a car with some good things about it and some pretty lame characteristics … and then goes on to award the rare five star rating.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Kixstart,

    Hyundai has baggage, but nobody takes potshots at them over the Excel and Sonata they dumped on our shores.

    I don’t call it a rant just because I don’t like what some of the commentors are saying. I call it a rant because that’s what it is, and it doesn’t add to the discussion. It’s not a challenge being issued to Detroit to fix the products. How can it be when they’ve already made it clear that no matter how good their product is, they won’t look at it? Every article about Detroit, good, bad, or otherwise, is nothing more than an opening for them to get their licks in and ‘stick it to them’ over a car they were dissatisfied with.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Hyundai? So what? Nobody spends much time praising Hyundai, either, except for their warranty.

    Whether you like it or not, each customer who will never look at a GM product again IS a challenge to GM. To survive and maybe thrive, GM needs those people back. Even if they said they’d never look at another GM product again, GM has to find a way. Conquest rebates aren’t the way to do it, either. They didn’t leave for price, they left for value.

    The first step to recovery is to admit you have a problem.

    As for an opportunity for dissatisfied GM customers to get their licks in, well, even if true, that’s just too bad for GM, isn’t it? Word-of-mouth is important. Take care of your customers.

    Charlene Blake appears to have a full-time job bad-mouthing Toyota for a sludge problem that, by some miracle, none of my friends have experienced. In fact, she’ll show up in topics where such a rant is decidedly off-topic. Sauce for the goose, as they say.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Quasimondo, GM needs a KILLER warranty.

    Conquest rebates won’t do it. Price is not the problem. The people that aren’t coming back have visions of getting just out of warranty and finding themselves suddenly faced with a repair bill that’s more than the car is worth. They want the value of a car they can rely on for 10 years. The current 5/100 warranty is a shell game and people know it. Hyundai can do it, you’d think GM could, too.

    A 10 year TRANSFERRABLE warranty would also help out with a boost to the resale value. What do people look for on the used market? Inexpensive but reliable wheels that they probably plan to run for a while. Between two 5 year old cars, the one that’s still guaranteed to be kept useable for another 5 years has a big edge and this will be reflected in the resale price.

    A 10 year warranty makes the statement that the car it’s attached to will be reliable for a very long time.

    The stumbling block, of course, is that the older the car gets, the more chickens come home to roost. If GM IS building a very durable and reliable car out of high-quality parts, a longer warranty won’t cost much. If GM is building a car out of lowest-possible-bid pieces…

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Quasi,

    The point of Hyundai is a compelling one to raise. There is NO REASON that GM couldn’t have designed a product renaissance the way Hyundai has over the last 20 years.

    People don’t rail on Hyundai because Hyundai products are not only competitive, they’re low cost price leaders or close to that in the categories where they compete.

    If GM had that type of value proposition, they would be well on their way to a much brighter future. But nope. Short term thinking, dealer greed, poor leadership, poor internal coordination and a starved product pipeline helped to get GM to where they are now. Malibu and CTS demonstrate there is hope, but since the Malibu isn’t “better” than its competitors, it needs to be priced more aggressively.

  • avatar

    The reason I come here is to get the truth – and get it I do.

    I’ve pretty much canceled my advertisement-subsidized subscriptions to almost every car magazine I ever got (with the exception of Excellence).

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