By on December 6, 2007

infinitis-lane-departure-warning-system.jpgNot content with vying for the 10 best 10 best cars award for 2007, cars.com has released their list of the "Top 10 New Features of 2007." While you might think their eds would be weighing the pros and cons of innovations that improve performance, handling or enhance the enthusiast's driving experience, you'd be mostly wrong. Cars' list is chock-a-block with features of dubious value, like Volvo's heartbeat sensor, Infiniti's scratch shield paint and Chrysler's Sirius satellite TV. Their "Best New Feature?" Infiniti's Lane Departure Warning Prevention system. The gizmo applies the brakes to certain wheels to nudge you back into your lane if you start drifting. (Which would have rendered The Fast and the Furious Tokyo Drift even more of a moot point.) Here's the complete list:

Lane Departure Prevention – Infiniti
Scratch Shield Paint – Infiniti
Around View Monitor – Infiniti
Full Size Hybrid SUVs – GM, Chrysler
Integrated Booster Seats – Volvo
Heartbeat Sensor – Volvo
Easy Third-Row Access – Hyundai
Sirius Satellite TV – Chrysler
Sync Hands-Free System – Ford
Blind Spot Information System – Volvo

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

14 Comments on “But What About Heated and Cooled Cup Holders?...”


  • avatar
    210delray

    Full size hybrid SUVs — just what we need: $50K SUVs that “get better mileage in the city than a 4-cylinder Camry or Accord.” Never mind that said SUVs’ highway mileage that is the same or only 1 mpg better than the city mileage.

    Heartbeat sensor — like how often do thugs break into your parked vehicle and wait for hours for you to come back to your car?

    Sat TV — another needless distraction to the driving task (I know, it’s not supposed to be visible to the driver).

    Sync, schminck — I guess I’m too “old school” to give a damn.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Intergrated booster seats? Didn’t Chrysler put those in their minivans about 10 years ago?

  • avatar
    210delray

    RE: Booster seats — yes Chrysler pioneered them in about 1992, but Volvo’s have two height settings, so you can use them for toddlers and older children.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    I don’t want any of these things. What I want is for auto engineers to focus on developing the best vehicle possible at the lowest possible expense.

  • avatar
    bfg9k

    210delray :
    Full size hybrid SUVs — just what we need: $50K SUVs that “get better mileage in the city than a 4-cylinder Camry or Accord.” Never mind that said SUVs’ highway mileage that is the same or only 1 mpg better than the city mileage.

    All the hybrid engineering wizardry in the world cannot overcome crappy aerodynamics, which matter much more at highway speeds.

    Big square front ends are going to vanish with the new mileage regulations. Buyers will have to get their macho fix in some other way, maybe chrome balls on the trailer hitch will become standard.

  • avatar

    210delray: Heartbeat sensor — like how often do thugs break into your parked vehicle and wait for hours for you to come back to your car? I've also read that it'll alert a parent who's too absorbed in their cell phone or Blackberry that they're forgetting about their kid in the back seat.

  • avatar
    210delray

    Frank, I’ve read about cases like that (one occurred locally with tragic results), but you’d really have to be pretty lame-brained IMO to forget about your own child in the car.

  • avatar
    starlightmica

    Did anyone else think of Night Driver after seeing the above picture?

  • avatar
    windswords

    210delray :
    December 6th, 2007 at 10:38 am

    “RE: Booster seats — yes Chrysler pioneered them in about 1992, but Volvo’s have two height settings, so you can use them for toddlers and older children.”

    I had a 94 Caravan with the built in seats. Although not height adjustable, as soon as our oldest was too big for the built in harness, it was no problem using the bottom cushion as booster for the 3 point belt. If it still didn’t fit just right you could use one of those gadgets that make the belt go across the shoulder correctly.

  • avatar
    taxman100

    I have a buddy with an Infiniti with the lane departure feature, as well as the lazer cruise control.

    He hates both features – it is like a nanny watching over you.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I had a 2007 S80 as a loaner recently which was equipped with BLIS. It was pretty cool/useful and I wish that my XC90 had it.

    Heartbeat sensor? eh

    Integrated Booster Seat? IBS? gross

  • avatar
    dean

    I’m with SherbornSean – give me a car with 3-series performance and handling, for the price of loaded Civic, and keep all your fancy features.

  • avatar
    sk8inkid

    Man, sure hope terrorists don’t find out about the Infiniti lane system. Next thing they be painting random dots all over the highway to watch the pileup!

  • avatar
    thecavanaughs

    According to Wikipedia, which as we know never gets anything wrong, Volvo had integrated boosters in 1990- I certainly recall them by the mid-90s. Are these different?

    On the other hand, I am glad Volvos have a heartbeat sensor now. I don’t know about you, but anytime I drive a Volvo I feel like someone better check my pulse afterwards.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • ToolGuy: JimZ, You’re not serious, but trade Jim Hackett for Elon Musk (keep Gwynne Shotwell) and see if...
  • Art Vandelay: They didn’t cost extra either
  • ToolGuy: …which is why I’ve left two OEM’s so far. And come to think of it, maybe why my kids...
  • ToolGuy: Some really old guys with broken wrists, arms and jaws might disagree with you – kidding. But if you...
  • Lorenzo: My first long drive was when I picked up my car in Providence RI and drove it to my Navy base in San Diego....

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States