By on November 30, 2007

jill-wagner.jpgNo matter how many hip-hop artists they hire to shill their products, domestic carmakers just can't get through to younger buyers. Mediapost's Marketing Daily reports that a new J.D. Power survey shows that the younger carbuyers are, the more likely they are to avoid domestic nameplates. On the other hand, buyers who go for domestic vehicles are more likely to shun a particular vehicle because it's an import. The study also showed more domestic vehicle buyers are in the interior of the country while import buyers are more plentiful along the coasts. The reasons given for going with imports: perceived fuel economy, reliability, quality, depreciation. Domestic buyers go that way because of styling and cost. No matter which way they swing, consumers' decisions not to buy particular vehicles are most often based on consumer reviews on line, expert reviews, and manufacturer web site information. 

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49 Comments on “Young Buyers Shun Domestics (Cars)...”


  • avatar
    taxman100

    I visited my brother-in-law, who is in residency for surgery. I let him drive my Grand Marquis – he loved it.

    However, being a doctor in Boston, he could never own one for professional reasons. So, he is constrained as much by social norms as anybody else.

    He’s 28, and I’m 41. I’m on my 2nd Grand Marquis, which is uncool even in the Midwest, but I don’t really care.

  • avatar
    glenn126

    I guess I am weird, taxman100, because I would simply drive what I like if I were your brother-in-law, doctor or not.

    I have to admit that perhaps if I’d have gotten a decent panther (owned a ’92 Town Car – one of the worst cars I’ve ever owned) I might have liked it. It had efficiency in MPG in excess of what people imagine is possible, considering it’s bulk – at least on the highway, anyway. It was comfortable, in a “hark back to my childhood” way. But every single thing mechanical went wrong time after time, until I wished I could have pushed it over a cliff.

    I was totally out of place in the car (about your current age), being way younger than the average owner, and in fact for this reason I was stopped by the local yokel cops as “suspicious” in our little village, no less. The reason I know it is because the book store lady used to keep a scanner on, and I was stopped within view of her store.

    So ‘social norms’ works in ways we can’t even imagine until we find out the hard way.

  • avatar
    Sammy Hagar

    The only thing more useless than a JDP award for initial quality is a JDP marketing analysis stating the obvious. Seriously, the hacks at JDP must be smart fellas…they get the car companies to pay them to compete in their surveys and then they get them to pay again to bar graph the most obvious information on the planet.

  • avatar
    brownie

    Breaking news: “Sky blue”, according to sources close to the situation.

  • avatar
    Virtual Insanity

    I’d shun her…gi-ga-ty.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    This, despite Toyota’s best efforts to drive them to domestics.

  • avatar
    zerofoo

    Jill Wagner – mmmmmm – nice, but not enough to get me to buy a Merc.

    I recently bought an Infiniti G35X. I considered a Cadillac CTS, but Kate Walsh couldn’t change my opinions of “art and science” and GM dealers.

    By the way, I’m 32 – does that make me a young buyer?

  • avatar
    AKM

    American car styling…as in “big, trucky-like?”
    Because beside that, the styling on American vehicles does not strike me as better or worse than others in their class:
    fusion or malibu vs. accord or altima: maybe an edge for the domestics
    focus vs. mazda3: mazda3 hands down
    caliber vs. golf: unlike you’re a fan or shrunk trucks, the golf wins even though styling is not its current forte
    Ford edge vs. Nissan murano: draw

    I’m not saying that American cars have worse styling, but that if styling is quoted as a specific reason to buy them, it’s like saying that buyers favor Toyotas because of their engine outputs…

  • avatar
    NBK-Boston

    taxman100:

    A shame about your brother-in-law. I’m of a similar age and in a similar professional training situation, in Boston no less, and I’ve been driving an old Panther-platform monster for years (’94 Town Car, by the way, and very few problems compared to glenn126’s experience — different engine and mechanicals between the two models, though, since the ’94 has the 4.6L V8 while the ’92 has the 5.0L).

    I drive it because I love it, and also because it was very cheap to acquire, and reliable enough for my purposes. When I enter practice and start earning enough to make a dent in my loans, I guess I’ll shop around for something to replace it, but for the time being I’m cruising in air-suspension luxury. And when I do replace it, I see no reason to shop only for imports or only on the dictates of fashion. Never been pulled over for being suspicious, by the way.

    My friends have given me some good-natured guff over the years for driving such an absurd car, but I’ve found that if you truly have the loyalty or respect of your friends, your car’s “cool” factor doesn’t much matter. And it’s really neat being able to stuff six people into that monster and be 1) legal and 2) surprisingly comfortable (provided the front middle passenger is not very big). It has some towing capacity — not that I’ve even found the need to employ it — and most importantly, it has what the movies call a “three-corpse trunk.”

    Fill up the tank, merge into traffic, punch up the cruise control, and you’re literally good for 500 miles in a single bound. How great is that?

    The difference is, I mean it.

  • avatar
    garllo

    What exatly is an “import” and what is “domestic”? My daughter bought a new Mazda6 it says FoMoCo on more parts on that car than it says Mazda. My Buick was built in Canada. The only car that I own that I’m sure is “domestic” is my Corvette.

  • avatar
    Lokkii

    My niece is 22. She doesn’t currently own and car and doesn’t want one, but will have to buy one soon since she’s graduated.

    I started to tell her that I’d give Uncle-advice and help her with a purchase since she knows nothing about cars and doesn’t care.

    It turns out that she does know one thing:

    Don’t buy an American Car.

    This despite the fact that her dad is a long-time domestic buyer. Guess she must have learned it in college.

  • avatar

    So it still IS “your father’s Buick”…

  • avatar
    Redbarchetta

    What is the deal with Ford and the Town Car(and the rest of the Panther platforms). I thought they were great when I worked for Budget. A little big for my corner carving driving style but damn they were nice cruisers with great power considering there size. Why on earth did Ford let it rot forever and then just toss it in the trash bin. There are many more cars in there lineup they should have trashed before this, like Mercury. Jill doesn’t make me want to buy one unless she comes with it and then my wife would protest unless she was cooking and cleaning.
    These guys at Ford are paid way too much money to make poor decisions, replace them all Al!

    Stupid survey, I can’t believe someone paid for info everone in the US already knows.

  • avatar
    peoplewatching04

    I’m 21 and recently bought my first car… I went for an import because all my car memories at a young age were of our Chevys/Fords/Plymouths breaking down, in the shop, etc. I remember my parents swearing about their cars, and I saw them gradually move from the Big 2.8 to Honda and Toyota vehicles. The first “car” memories that young buyers (people in their 20s and 30s) have are of some of the worst cars put out by domestic car makers. Even though GM/Ford are putting out much better cars now, the memories are still there. Maybe in another 15-20 years, they’ll see some younger buyers.

  • avatar
    jcp2

    “No matter which way they swing, consumers’ decisions not to buy particular vehicles are most often based on consumer reviews on line, expert reviews, and manufacturer web site information.”

    Sorry, if this were the case, wouldn’t there not be an import/domestic schism both demographically and geographically?

    P.S. I lobbied for a panther plastform car, but my wife didn’t want a taxicab in the driveway.

  • avatar
    davey49

    Oh well, Saturn was the best chance to stem this tide of “domestic hatred”. It worked for a few years, mostly because buyers never realized it was an American car. Now they sell “imports”.

  • avatar
    umterp85

    Well—-I hate to rain on the anti-domestic party…but facts are fact…The TRUTH is the TRUTH no matter how many people want to dismiss it…the Youth of the US are still into domestics.

    TRU (Teen Research Unlimited)…probably the leading research outlet against the teen market performs an annual omnibus study against teen usage and attitude behavior (read thousanda of teens are surveyed)—-one of the categories they survey is autos. Here is the bad news for the import bigots (that is those that want to selectively use JD Power data as noted above).

    When asked what their top ten “attainable” (read those that they will buy SOON) vehicles are—the list was an even spilt between domestic and japanese.

    The list is as follows:

    1) Ford Mustang
    2) Honda Civic
    3) Honda Accord
    4) Toyota Corolla
    5) Toyota Camry
    6) Mazda 3
    7) Chevy Impala
    8) Ford F150
    9) Ford Focus
    10)Jeep Wrangler

    Gee—3 Fords in the Top 10 among teens—who said the FORD brand does not have a future.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Umterp85, there’s a difference between what teens intend and what they achieve. If and when they actually get the money in their pockets, they may find their attitudes change and they reassess wants vs needs.

    My kids have all announced an intention to go Toyota. Why? I’m happy with mine and the kids have memories of watching the tow truck drag everything else away for repairs.

    It’s Marketing 101; it’s better to keep a customer than try to win one. Or his kids.

  • avatar
    umterp85

    Kixstart: No offense—but I tend tend to believe the purchase intent results of a non-biased quant study vs. anecdotal prose of 1 person. That’s marketing 101 for us in the profession.

    BTW—take a look at the list and tell me what there is to disagree with…it may be useful to augment your arguement. Your kids will obviously go to the Toyota Camry or Corolla which are on the list. Joe 16 year old from Kansas might go for the F150. It appears the Mustang is a car that all teens want to buy regardless of where they live as it is the #1 car teens want to buy.

    My point—the title of this article (Young Buyers tend to shun Domestic cars) may not be all it is cracked up to be. Do you believe all that JD Powers reports or is this a case of selective use of data to make your point to support import bigotry ?

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    I don’t know the methodology here.

    Are the cars in order of the most often listed? If so, the top five is only 1 domestic. Who gets to number 6 on their wishlist before buying?

    Also, it may not matter what are the top ten. If the sales continue in the same ratios among those choices the domestics are doomed.

    I would suggest digging deeper into that study before counting your chickens.

  • avatar
    KnightRT

    I wrote a rather nice writeup, and then pressed “Back” and deleted it all. Some thoughts on why I, at 23, wouldn’t choose a domestic:

    1) Domestics don’t handle unless they’re a CTS or a Corvette. Where are the slick DSG transmissions? The budget BMWs? The trick 4WD systems? The N/A 1.8 liter engines with 100 HP/liter that Honda had back in 1994? Are we so technologically backwards in engineering that every single innovation of interest has to come from overseas? This is fantastically depressing from an engineering perspective. I refuse to believe the Germans or the Italians or the Japanese are inherently better at making sporting vehicles.

    2) Domestics don’t have decent power-to-weight ratios, usually because they’re overweight or boast antiquated drivetrains. Those that do, have it at the expense of everything else, like the old SRT-4. Why am I surprised when a domestic sedan breaks 7 seconds to 60 MPH? The Altima was in the mid-6s since 2002.

    Really, both of these boil down to the same thing. To me, this huge reluctance to pull even with, or perhaps even set the technological standard, is outright corporate laziness. It’s bean-counting. I just won’t buy a car that makes me feel cheap.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    NBK-Boston: I’ve been driving an old Panther-platform monster for years (’94 Town Car, by the way, and very few problems compared to glenn126’s experience — different engine and mechanicals between the two models, though, since the ‘94 has the 4.6L V8 while the ‘92 has the 5.0L).

    Actually, Ford’s 4.6 Liter V-8 engine was first introduced as standard equipment in the 1991 Lincoln Town Car. (The 1990 Town Car had received completely new sheet metal for the first time since the 1980 model year, but still used the 5.0 Liter V-8.)

    The 4.6 Liter V-8 showed up next in the 1992 Crown Victoria and Grand Marquis which were introduced with all-new sheet metal early in the spring of 1991.

  • avatar
    chanman

    That survey… Impala, Camry, Accord? Interesting results for teens, eh?

  • avatar
    NBK-Boston

    Johnster:

    You’re right — I just double checked — so thanks for pointing it out. I mixed up my ’90s and my ’92s for some reason, I guess because the ’90 was the first one with the new sheetmetal. My father owned one, and it was visually similar to my ’94, and for some reason I got it into my head that it was a ’92.

    But now I can’t explain why glenn126’s ’92 Town Car was such a dog, as he tells it, because I’ve got about 170,000 miles on my monster, and I’ve only suffered a small number of parts failures during over the years, none of which left me stranded on the side of the highway, only one of which made it impossible to start (starter motor wiring harness came loose — others were leaky air suspension, leaky steering pump, and a coil pack with one dead ignition lead). Given the age and the mileage on the thing, I’m not averse to dealing with a part failure every other year.

  • avatar
    timd38

    I am 53 and I never understood how people could buy Asian branded cars. Then I bought a new 2006 Corvette that broke before I got it home from the dealer. After that, I tried to sell my Lincoln LS, great car, no resale value. My wife’s 2004 Jeep was just “cheezzy” because of the poor quality materials that were used.

    Thank God the I leased the Jeep, I should have leased the LS also, but that is the past. The Jeep was replaced with an 2008 Acura. Boring, yes but reliable and great resale that has a quality feel to the interior.

    Most likely won’t look at GM, Ford or Chrysler for my next purchase.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    umterp85 :
    December 1st, 2007 at 12:02 am

    Well—-I hate to rain on the anti-domestic party…but facts are fact…The TRUTH is the TRUTH no matter how many people want to dismiss it…the Youth of the US are still into domestics.

    TRU (Teen Research Unlimited)…probably the leading research outlet against the teen market performs an annual omnibus study against teen usage and attitude behavior (read thousanda of teens are surveyed)—-one of the categories they survey is autos. Here is the bad news for the import bigots (that is those that want to selectively use JD Power data as noted above).

    When asked what their top ten “attainable” (read those that they will buy SOON) vehicles are—the list was an even spilt between domestic and japanese.

    The list is as follows:

    1) Ford Mustang
    2) Honda Civic
    3) Honda Accord
    4) Toyota Corolla
    5) Toyota Camry
    6) Mazda 3
    7) Chevy Impala
    8) Ford F150
    9) Ford Focus
    10)Jeep Wrangler

    Gee—3 Fords in the Top 10 among teens—who said the FORD brand does not have a future.

    Teens? Teens don’t buy new cars. If teens want a 1989 Mustang well thats great, it’s cheap (no resale value), eary to work on and it’s a lot slower than it looks. Doesn’t help Fords sales one bit though.

  • avatar
    umterp85

    Landcrusher / TankdOg—-yes the cars are listed in order of preference. My point is that Ford does not appear to be a dead brand walking in the teen group. The Mustang is the #1 car—-the F150 the #1 truck.

    I’m not counting chickens—I’m merely stating that with all of the crap Ford mgmt is trying to solve for now—the Ford brand still seems to have a base of interest with future buyers if they survive. I think that is a good thing…do you ????

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    umterp85 :
    December 1st, 2007 at 10:58 am

    Landcrusher / TankdOg—-yes the cars are listed in order of preference.
    My point is that Ford does not appear to be a dead brand walking in the teen group. The Mustang, F150, and Focus seem to resonate with this group.

    I’m not counting chickens—I’m merely stating that with all of the crap Ford mgmt is trying to solve for now—the Ford brand still seems to have a base of interest with future buyers if they survive. I think that is a good thing…do you ????

    My first car that I bought with my own money was a GMC S15 extended bed 4×4 pickup with a 2.8L v6. It seemed like a good idea, room for my friends and their mountain bikes and off road ability. Turned me off GM forever. Worst peice of crap I have encounted to date. I chaulk the purchase up to my ignorance of cars at the time. With the internet that is no longer an excuse. It’s no surprise to see the Jeep Wrangler in that list, I can’t imagine that they mean a late model FWD Chevy Impala though. If you need a pickup truck to haul your dirt bike well the F150 is an obvious choice. I find it hard to beleive however that a Neon or Cavalier isn’t in that list, since the parking lot at the high school down the street is packed with them.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    What’s surprised me is that there is only one pickup on that entire list… and only one compact SUV (which should rank a helluva lot higher on that ranking than a Chevy Impala). I think $3 gas is having a heavy influence on the rankings.

    On an inter-related note, one factor that may be helping VW’s resale value these days is all the teenaged and college girls that want to buy a Jetta. I swear that the Jetta is probably the most femme oriented vehicle in the market today. THAT should be the car with the flower vase on the dash instead of the Beetle.

    Panther cars, Wranglers and F150’s are definitely pegged on the testosterone side. Everything else on that list is pretty much androgynous. I would think that a Mustang convertible would actually have a fairly good female demographic to it.

  • avatar
    Landcrusher

    Umterp,

    On an emotional level, I would be sad to see Ford go. However, I am not that attached that I care about it enough to try to help. There is a HUGE amount of harm to our country from the domestics being run the way they are. They command too many resources for their incompetent management while they feed the unions cash to subvert our government. The net effect is negative beyond the amount to be lost if all the profits they bring into the country were to dissappear.

    Stephen,
    I don’t think it’s $3 gas as it is the constant barrage of environmental messages they are all getting. They would be afraid to say they want a big SUV. Must be the country music crowd and rural teens bringing in the F150.

  • avatar
    umterp85

    tankd0g: Although the survey was limited to “attainable vehicles”…..Neons and Cavaliers were not on the list becuase the survey only involved new car purchase.

    Landcrusher: never asked you to help Ford—-and never meant this string to get into another “Ressler Thread” as I think we have all beat that topic pretty good. My main point—as stated—is based on the Teen Survey….the Ford brand still has “life” with kids.

    I think that is a good thing and bodes well for the company if Mulally is able to lead them out of their self induced mess.

    I think he is concentrating on the right things now (safety + reliability) to be able to retain those that buy a Ford product now. It is particulary relevant against the young target…if the point of entry into the Ford brand is positive (i.e. safe, reliable, and in the Mustangs case stylish) the better chance for a return visit to Ford (hopefully with better product line than they have now)

  • avatar
    Dynamic88

    “That survey… Impala, Camry, Accord? Interesting results for teens, eh?”

    I’d say suspicious rather than interesting.

    If they’d had a similar survey when I was a teen, I can promise you there’d have been no Polaras, Biscaynes, or LTDs on the list.

    It’s nice that teens like Mustangs – I certainly did. Of course, by the time the finsh college, start paying those loans, start saving for a house, start a family, those thoughts of Mustangs will go right out the window until they are in their mid 50s. But I doubt Ford has any plans to update the ‘Stange before 2035 anyway.

  • avatar

    Now look what happened when they released Fast and the Furious, 2F2F, and Tokyo Drift… It has created a world full of hatred between the Dom and Imp world… I have vette my friend has a supra they're both highly modded and both kick azz cars. So there Live together in harmony. 

  • avatar
    umterp85

    Dynamic 88 “That survey… Impala, Camry, Accord? Interesting results for teens, eh?” I’d say suspicious rather than interesting.

    Why do you think this is suspicious ? Just like their adult counterparts, I reckon that there are teens who don’t give a hoot about cars and will simply default to what their parents drive for their first car purchase—they do not know any better—nor does this group of teens probably care.

    Dynamic 88 “It’s nice that teens like Mustangs – I certainly did. Of course, by the time the finsh college, start paying those loans, start saving for a house, start a family, those thoughts of Mustangs will go right out the window until they are in their mid 50s”

    I have a 2005 Mustang—-and I can assure you I am not in my mid-50’s. Life is too short to not drive what you like….hopefully you will not / or did not wait until your mid 50’s to do so.

    BTW—the beauty of the Mustang is that my two kids can travel with me as the back seat is more than big enough for them. Their friends think it is pretty cool that their friends Dad drives a Mustang as well….certainly much cooler than dropping off the kids at school in a grandpa like Camry.

  • avatar
    davey49

    KnightRT- The Germans, Italians and Japanese make better sporting vehicles because there’s no demand for them in the US. In order to make vehicles that Americans want (think large 7 passenger vehicles or full size trucks that tow 10000# or more) the Japanese companies had to come to the US to design and build their vehicles.
    There’s no demand for small cars in the US either so domestic companies aren’t any good at that either. Small cars for all automakers will likely be designed in Europe or Asia from now on.

  • avatar
    KixStart

    Umterp85, I’m saying that no one should plan on taking that teen study to the bank. As others pointed out, they buy what’s cheap and/or available or just handed down and if these cars were really “attainable,” the parking lot at the local high school would be full of Mustangs.

    It isn’t.

  • avatar
    umterp85

    KixStart—you are missing my point—I am not using the data to prove what teens drive (you are correct that they tend to have what is cheap and available)—rather—-the point is teens have not dismissed Ford as a brand. This has implications for when they have discretionary income to make a new car purchase.

  • avatar

    dynamic88 "It’s nice that teens like Mustangs – I certainly did. Of course, by the time the finsh college, start paying those loans, start saving for a house, start a family, those thoughts of Mustangs will go right out the window until they are in their mid 50s. But I doubt Ford has any plans to update the ‘Stange before 2035 anyway." Dang… Mid 50's… I thought that is when you buy a Vette??? LMAO

  • avatar
    speedlaw

    we need to come up with another way to describe this. Back in the day, “domestics” were GM X bodies and Chryco (RIP) K cars, against Corollas and small honda accords. The cars were hugely distant in points of origin and in quality.

    Today, I chose between two cars, one of which is built in Ontario and one in Ohio. I bought the Ontario built car, which is nominally “japanese”, not the “american” one. The canadien car was built closer to me than the American. Quality was very close but a horrid dealer body helped make the decision.

    Did I buy an import ? How about my Mexican Golf ? Is it German ?

    This should have been entitled Big 2.6 vs the world.

    We need a better description…

  • avatar
    Terry

    “This should have been entitled Big 2.6 vs the world.”

    It’s already been established that the world won.
    In passenger cars, with the exception of the Corvette, nobody considers US cars competitive or desirable. If WE dont want them, why should anybody else?

  • avatar
    Buick61

    Since turning 16 (gasp, a decade ago), I’ve purchased five new cars. 1998 Malibu, 2000 Saturn L-Series V6, 2005 Chrysler 300C, 2006 Pontiac G6 GTP manual, and 2007 Cadillac SRX.

    After each purchase I’ve had to respond to people of ALL ages on why I’d buy an American car. Maybe that sort of Anti-American car-ism is just entrenched on the coasts, as I’m on the Eastern Seaboard.

    They all were good cars (well, the first two were “good” in a different sense than the last three), and anyone who drove in them were surprised American car companies were actually building decent cars.

    I’ve never felt like I was driving a second rate car from a second rate manufacturing country. I blame the baby-boomers with their memories of GM, Ford, and Chrysler cars of the ’70s – 1995. Their negativity has rubbed off on Gen-X and Gen-Y buyers, and so the younger set is wired to not give the domestics a chance.

  • avatar
    KBW

    If you buy a new car every two to three years your perception of cars will be different from the average consumer. The real problem with American cars is what happens to them between the 5-10 year marks.

  • avatar
    jthorner

    “1998 Malibu, 2000 Saturn L-Series V6, 2005 Chrysler 300C, 2006 Pontiac G6 GTP manual, and 2007 Cadillac SRX.”

    Wow, you have enjoyed one big pile of depreciation costs. I keep my new cars longer than the average California marriage lasts, so the example of a new-every-few-years car buyer means little to my situation. I’m not the only one.

  • avatar
    Terry

    Buick61 wrote:”I blame the baby-boomers with their memories of GM, Ford, and Chrysler cars of the ’70s – 1995. Their negativity has rubbed off on Gen-X and Gen-Y buyers, and so the younger set is wired to not give the domestics a chance.”

    So.. you blame the consumer and his poor experience with the product and not the manufacturer of that product??
    Gen X’s and Y’s parents learned the hard way not to trust the traditonal domestic carmakers. It’s only natural for experience to be handed down to the kids.
    You go to a restaurant and get food poisoning, do you return to give them a 2nd chance?

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    I find it hard to beleive however that a Neon or Cavalier isn’t in that list, since the parking lot at the high school down the street is packed with them.

    Zero resale value and parents that want to dump them result in a wasteland of junk at the high schools. Ever met a kid the WANTS a Cavalier?

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    Yeah, actually when I was in school a Z24 or a Cavalier convertible was considered a good buy for some.

    Then again, I grew up in the guido capital of the world where Camaros and Firebirds were as common as zits and fake gold chains.

    New Jersey… bad accents, bad taste, and in the 80’s, REALLY bad hair. I looked at my yearbook picture recently and thought I was looking at two parts Bon Jovi one part Horseshack. Or was it really the other way around.

    The fast and furious crowd was left behind by Detroit a LONG time ago, and the rich kids in suburbia all want Audi’s, Honda’s, Toyota’s and VW’s.

  • avatar
    tankd0g

    Zero resale value and parents that want to dump them result in a wasteland of junk at the high schools. Ever met a kid the WANTS a Cavalier?

    Are you kidding? These kids are spending small fortunes on tuning these rust buckets just like Civic owners.

  • avatar
    ronin

    >>So.. you blame the consumer and his poor experience with the product and not the manufacturer of that product??

    It’s not that, it’s just an internet thang, fostered by the longterm success of claiming victimhood and thereby getting to ascribe blame elsewhere. This phenomenon is a sort of intergenerational resentment. It gets to blame all manner of problems on another generation.

    It serves only to keep the masses in-fighting, and not watching where the real problems arise.

  • avatar

    I love you Jill Wagner

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