The Truth About Cars » Toyota Yaris http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Sun, 27 Jul 2014 20:45:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars » Toyota Yaris http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com 2015 Toyota Yaris Has “European Flavor”, We’re Afraid To Ask… http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/07/872122/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/07/872122/#comments Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:00:01 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=872122 2015_Toyota_Yaris_001

 

Toyota is touting a new “European flavor” for the 2015 Yaris. I’m not sure what that means, but it does evoke bad memories of the chevre I left in my suitcase after coming home from the Paris Auto Show. All jokes aside (and that was bahhhhh-d), our Yaris will likely be built in France, but Toyota is looking for a way to both incorporate that into their messaging, and avoid telling everyone that their new subcompact is built by a bunch of socialist surrender monkeys. It’s not easy to explain the poor economics of building a subcompact car in Japan, but telling American consumers that its made in France is likely even more difficult. Not much has changed mechanically, and the 4-speed automatic still remains. C’est la.

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Rental Review: Toyota Yaris LE http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/11/rental-review-toyota-yaris-le/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/11/rental-review-toyota-yaris-le/#comments Mon, 25 Nov 2013 16:55:23 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=663722 yaris1

Yaris: It’s A Car! If you go to the Toyota website to learn about the logical successor to the original, and fabulous, Corolla Tercel, that is the slogan with which you’ll be confronted.

Yaris: It’s A Car!

What you won’t find is any mention of how much power the Yaris makes (106 horsepower) or the specific type of transmission fitted to the vehicle (the venerable Toyota transverse four-speed automatic). Nor will you be tremendously impressed by the listed EPA mileage (37mpg highway). This isn’t an oversight on the part of the Toyota hivemind. It’s a way of qualifying customers. If your expectations for the Yaris are that it will, in fact, be a car, and that it will get about 37 miles per gallon on the highway, then strap yourself down, my friend, because your expectations are about to be met!

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In the days when Michael Karesh regularly contributed to this site, he was deservedly famous for both his relentlessly data-driven approach to automobiles and for his shockingly poor cellphone photos of said automobiles. Mr. Karesh had a Craiglister’s approach to vehicular photography — but with the image floating above these words, I believe I’ve topped him. This is what happens when you run out of light and your SLR’s sitting on your desk at home, ninety miles away. At that point, it’s “Enter The Samsung”.

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I rented a 2013 Yaris LE with a sticker price of $16,490 from Enterprise this past weekend. My goal was to drive to Brownsburg, IN to meet young tube-amp savant Bobby Getchell and take delivery of my Paul Cochrane-built Heritage Patriot amp, which Mr. Getchell had refitted with NOS Mullard and Sylvania tubes at some nontrivial expense. This would give me the chance to put four hundred or so miles on the Yaris in the course of a single day. I also used the little Toyota to take a friend to dinner, said friend being a young lady approaching six feet tall and possessed of a thirty-six-inch inseam. Remember that, it’s relevant later, I promise. Finally, I tossed the car seat in the back and obtained my son’s opinion on the thing.

Oddly enough, both my four-year-old son and six-footer friend said the same thing about the Yaris: it’s not roomy. The two of them wouldn’t have been able to coexist in the thing; moving the passenger seat far enough forward for my scion (as opposed to the Scion, which this Yaris emphatically is not) to be able to fit his legs between the end of the child seat’s thigh support and the back of the front seat would have rendered said front seat completely uninhabitable for the Dutch girl. But even with the front seat moved all the way back, it was impossible for Miss Thirty Six Inch Inseam to cross her legs in the car. She was forced to sit flat-footed and upright in the thing. “Not,” she pronounced, “as roomy as my Civic.” Well, that’s okay, it’s a class below the Civic.

What might be more relevant is that the Yaris doesn’t feel as roomy as the Fit, to say nothing of the dearly missed previous-generation Nissan Versa, which was sort of the class champion in many respects. Only Fiesta drivers will consider the Yaris a spacious place in which to do business. The Yaris before this one felt airier up front. It also possessed a sort of joie de vivre that this one completely lacks.

From the moment you hear that most despised of automotive sound signatures — a lackluster four-cylinder spinning up against a loose torque converter — you’ll know that the map of Yaris World has no room for Funtasyland. Oh, how it groans to move this relatively upright box around. How it moans on the freeway, where the relatively short fourth gear consigns it to a rev level that is unknown due to Toyota’s refusal to make a tachometer part of the dashboard but it is certainly higher than it needs to be. Dipping into third for a quick pass feels approximately as mechanically sympathetic as roping the rear bumper to a tree and making it do a prolonged one-tire burnout. “It’s so loud!” my clone said, “I can’t hear the song about how you should come back home on your own.” It’s true: the Yaris is the loudest car I’ve driven in some time. To put things into perspective, the day before my son and I had driven my leaky-roofed 560SL a hundred and ten miles from Columbus to Cincinnati and he didn’t bother to complain about the noise in that.

It doesn’t help that Toyota supplies the car with a stereo system that is nominally feature-complete (Bluetooth, iPod and 1/8″ plug compatible) but which cannot be heard on the freeway without being cranked to the point of distortion. Nor is wind noise well-controlled. If I drove the Yaris again for any length of time, I’d bring earplugs. I’m not kidding.

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On the positive side, the dynamic composure of the littlest Toyota is far better on the freeway than it was in any generation of Tercel or Echo. It’s on par with the outgoing Corolla in that regard, rarely wandering under wind pressure and demonstrating a remarkable felicity of ride. It’s only when I’m bouncing around the brick-paved streets of German Village in Columbus that I realize how they did it: the suspension is so soft that the Yaris will scrape its nose on wavy pavement. This proved to be so amusing — setting the little car up to oscillate at forty MPH or so and letting it repeatedly bang its snout on the bricks — that it took the sound of a rattling Mullard tube from behind me to make me stop.

“I wasn’t going to say anything about the amplifier,” my passenger smirked, “because you were clearly so pleased with yourself.”

That I was. But should potential Yaris buyers be as pleased with the ownership experience as I was with the nose-grinding? To be truthful, this is not a car that I can recommend to anyone. The extra money that would be required to upgrade from this to a Corolla would be money well spent and it would almost certainly be returned to the customer upon the sale of the vehicle. The Yaris is inferior to the Corolla in every possible way. Even the fuel economy is less than brilliant, the overwhelmed 1.6/four-speed combo yielding about thirty five miles to the gallon, give or take a little measuring error, during a long trip in which I consciously laid off the throttle. At twelve grand, the Yaris makes a case for itself. At sixteen and a half, which places it just a grand south of a similarly equipped Corolla, it’s…

Well, it’s a car.

But it’s a car without a point.

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The venue for these photographs was the old Brookville BMX track just east of the Ohio-Indiana border. Your humble author enjoyed dozens of races there from 1984 to 2004 and misses it dearly.

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Mazda Expanding Scalable Platform To B Segment; Does That Mean The Next Yaris Won’t Suck? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/05/mazda-expanding-scalable-platform-to-b-segment-does-that-mean-the-next-yaris-wont-suck/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/05/mazda-expanding-scalable-platform-to-b-segment-does-that-mean-the-next-yaris-wont-suck/#comments Wed, 22 May 2013 12:00:16 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=489154 2011_Mazda2_Touring_--_11-30-2010_2.jpg

A report from Just-Auto suggests that the next Mazda2 will “use [a] downsized CX-5 platform”. While this is technically true, the headline is a bit misleading.

The platform used by the Mazda CX-5 is the same platform that underpins the Mazda6 as well as the upcoming Mazda3. Not only will Mazda be using it to underpin the Mazda2, but it looks like all of their future transverse, front-drive cars will adopt it. This is great news for anyone who likes to drive, as every vehicle so far that uses it is a superb car to drive.

This is also good news for Toyota. The next iteration of their Yaris is supposed to be built by Mazda using the Mazda2 platform at the company’s new Mexican factory. The Yaris is a bit of a dull drive to say the least, but if it really is sharing Mazda’s new scalable architecture, that should change things quite dramatically. The ability to amortize the costs of one architecture across multiple product lines should also be a huge help to Mazda. As Japan’s last “independent” auto maker, keeping its costs under control is crucial in an era of consolidation and shaky economic fundamentals.

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Hedonist vs Frugalist : 2012 Toyota Yaris SE http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/09/hedonist-vs-frugalist-2012-toyota-yaris-se/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/09/hedonist-vs-frugalist-2012-toyota-yaris-se/#comments Tue, 11 Sep 2012 13:00:32 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=459551

Tercel. Echo. Yaris.

When the history of great cars is written, these models will likely not be anywhere near the short list.

After all, few cars that are plain-jane, spartan and underpowered make it to the latest and greatest coffee table books or Top 100 lists.

Yet, imagine if you asked actual owners about their best cars instead of the usual short-take reviewer?

I am willing to bet that the real world  Top 100 vehicles would have plenty of small cars that would be easy to own, reliable, and most of all….

Jacques Hedonist: Fun! It’s one of those words that can cover a whole gamut of situations. Fun in the twisties. Fun in the sun. Fun taking the family out to Wallyworld.

This Yaris SE is a fun little runabout. We’re not talking about Miata levels or fun, or even Fit levels of fun. We’re talking more in the lines of taking out your best friend’s brother or sister on a purely platonic lunch, and finding out that they are far more interesting than you imagined.

Stefan Frugalist: We’ll start with that unassuming exterior.

The Yaris SE is in many ways a first generation Matrix with 80% of the size and 90% of the interior space.

It offers that typical Toyota front fascia of our modern time.

A side profile with enough lines, ovals and ellipses to resemble a generic five door hatchback.

And a rear that pretty much finishes the nip and tuck of trying to turn a $16,000 commuter into an $18,000 commuter with a little sporting pretension.


 

Like that old Matrix, it is still a grocery getter of sorts. But unlike that model, the Yaris SE has one penetrating weakness that makes it almost ignored in today’s marketplace.

Hedonist: Competition.

We’ll put it to you this way. Let’s say you brought the Yaris SE, the Hyundai Accent and the Fiat 500 to an auto show for the first time.

The Fiat would be ogled. It’s arguably the most distinctive subcompact design of this generation. The Accent would be admired. The Yaris SE? Maybe a few glances. But in our weeks worth of driving it and leaving the SE trimmed Yaris in crowded parking lots throughout Atlanta, nobody made so much as a peep about this vehicle.

Frugalist: But then again some people don’t want to be noticed.

Do Camry and Corolla drivers get noticed? Maybe if the Camry has a blinker light that has been accidentally left on. Or if the Corolla scurried around town with a potted plant on top of it. Maybe then they would get noticed.

Often times non-enthusiasts don’t want to get noticed. They want to have a comfortable car with maybe a few appreciable design elements, an interior that makes for a pleasant environment, and enough utility to get the job done. These days they also want two other important things.

 

Hedonist: Reliability and fuel economy. Once you climb into this vehicle, drive it for a while and look around, you begin to understand where the SE’s sweet spots lies.

It’s in the interior for starters. The seats are eerily reminiscent of the ones in the Toyota Celica of the early-90′s. Very similar design. Exemplary comfort. With thick stitching and good lumbar support for what is in essence a commuter vehicle.

 

Frugalist: The interior is also bereft of any of the ‘easy to see’ cost cutting of other models. The door panels and dashboard are made of the same quality materials you would expect to see in a modern day $20,000 top of the line compact car.

The radio and speaker system would be right at home in a similarly priced Scion.

Even the instrument cluster has a similar design as the one in the Scion FR-S.

Hedonist: Start the vehicle. Drive around town or in the ‘burbs, and you’re never wanting for more power in any real life situation. The Yaris SE may only have 106 horsepower at 6,000 rpm’s. But the acceleration is there. 0 to 60 is around 9′ish and there was no wait or hunting of gears.

This vehicle is like most Toyotas. The automatic has a tendency to lock in at top gear right around 35 to 37 mph if you’re not going on the interstate. When you do go on the highway, everything is… predictable and non-eventful.

The SE model is a little bit noisy on the highway in that typical small car, small engine way. But the folks considering a car like this are a bit more concerned about other things.

 

Frugalist: Like fuel economy. This thing is an absolute marvel given the fact that the powertrain has no hybrid, turbo or CVT. A 4-speed automatic coupled with a 1.5 Liter easy to maintain engine and only about 2300 pounds of heft returned us a real-world combined 37 mpg around winding roads and the highway.

No that’s not a typo. Now I should mention that our town driving has a lot of long one lane roads with stop signs every mile or two. Folks drive 30 to 50 in our neck of the woods. Not 25 to 35. As a matter of context the Sonic reviewed here a year ago got 32 mpg and the Versa returned 33.5 mpg.

The Yaris offers class leading fuel economy with an interior that isn’t quite as large as these two competitors. But it offers plenty of usable space for a family of four and an excellent level of safety with 5 star NHTSA and Euro NCAP rating. We should mention that there is some debate on the later safety rating which can be found here.

Hedonist: The other edge the Yaris SE has in the subcompact hatch segment is durability.

A normally aspirated Toyota that averages about 500,000 units a year on a global basis will usually offer outstanding durability and reliability that makes long-term owners truly happy. The reviews here, here and here reflect Toyota’s penchant for building outstanding small cars.

In fact, this type of vehicle represents the optimal car for a dealership (like Steve Lang’s) that specializes in owner financing and cars that can ‘make the note’. Small Toyotas take abuse better than nearly anything out there and the Yaris SE will likely follow that trend.

The NZ-based engine in the Yaris has been built for over a decade with over 20 Toyotas using it in various forms; including a modified version for the Toyota Prius.  The 4-Speed automatic has also been around for forever and a day.

Long story short, this Yaris will endure the ages and then some. If it’s driven reasonably and maintained to the specs.

Frugalist: Owning the Yaris SE for the long, long run would not be an overwhelming or underwhelming experience. It would simply be ‘whelming’. With that said, who should test drive one?

  • Anyone who is in the market for a Honda Fit. Yes, the Fit is a more dynamic vehicle with plenty of versatility. But the Yaris doesn’t have the same annoying level of highway buzziness. Though the MSRP difference is only between $300 to $700 between the two, the real life difference may end up in the $1500 range.
  • Folks who are ‘Toyota-centric’ and want to avoid a hybrid powertrain.
  • Non-enthusiasts who are planning on keeping their vehicles for 12 to 15 years, prefer hatchbacks,  and want the most bulletproof powertrain possible.

Frugalists may be better served by a Prius C. As for enthusiasts and everything in between? The number of vehicles to consider in this market is absolutely staggering. Sonic, Accent, Rio, 500, Fit, the upcoming Versa hatchback, Fiesta, the SX4, Impreza… and that’s just 9 of 20+ potential fits if the buyer is willing to consider a sedan or a coupe.

The Yaris SE isn’t as good as a Fit. In fact, other than the Versa, this model is simply unable to match most competitors when it comes to thrilling driving dynamics.

Hedonist: But cars are kinda like music when it comes to fun. Some of us are true hardcore music aficionados who seek brilliance in that fifth dimension. While others turn the radio to the easy listening station, and enjoy overplayed Billy Joel songs.

The Yaris SE is a ‘light rock’ hatchback. Predictable. Reassuring. It’s probably the perfect car for someone whose only rebellious act in their entire lifetime has been listening to Billy Joel songs about ‘crashing parties’ and ‘riding motorcycles in the rain’.

If you have a friend who is moving out and needs a new car for the longest time, well, you may be right to recommend a Yaris SE.

Tell her about it… preferably at Mr. Cacciatore’s down on Sullivan Street… and bring some earplugs if that radio is tuned to the wrong station.

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Review: 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/03/review-2012-toyota-yaris-3-door/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/03/review-2012-toyota-yaris-3-door/#comments Mon, 26 Mar 2012 15:29:30 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=435601

The 2012 Yaris! It’s a car! That might sound like the strangest marketing claim for a new car ever, but if you dig deeper it is Toyota’s attempt at saying “OK, we get it.” Why? Because Toyota, like most manufacturers, has had trouble staying on message with basic transportation. Need proof? Look no further than the Corolla. The Corolla was a small, cheap and cheerful vehicle that has since grown into a 15-foot long sedan that weighs almost 3,000lbs and can reach $20,000 with options. No matter how nice a Corolla might be, cheap to buy it isn’t.

It’s a hatchback!

Part of getting back on message with the Yaris was simplifying the lineup by ditching the sedan leaving the 5-door Michael Karesh snagged back in February, and the cheapest Toyota in America: the 3-door hatchback I had for a week. Why no sedan? Toyota tells us it accounted for less than 30% of sales so it had to be euthanized in the name of progress. Further simplifying things, there just two trims for the 3-door hatch (L and LE) and three for the 5-door (L, LE and SE) reducing the possible number of configurations from 25 in 2011 to 9. Yep, 9. In addition, there are essentially no options on the Yaris, you pick the number of doors, manual or automatic, select from 8 available paint colors, cruise control and away you go for $14,115 to $17,960. Never before has buying a Toyota been this simple.

It has a steering wheel!

There may be a color palate to choose from on the outside, but inside all 3-door Yaris models get the same grey-on-black interior thanks to Toyota’s streamlining. Plastics are as hard as you would expect in a car that starts under 15-grand, but the doors and dash do get a thin coating of squishy soft-touch plastics (it’s the grey part in the picture). Compared to the outgoing Yaris, the 2012 is positively normal with the instrument cluster returning to a normal position in-front of the driver. Keeping costs in check, the only model that sports a tachometer is the “sporty” 5-door SE model Michael reviewed. Our tester, as with the rest of the lineup gets a round blank spot that illuminates at night to remind you that you didn’t pop for the SE. Our LE tester had the only two options going: cruise control for $250 (available only on 3-door LE models with the automatic) and floor mats for $180. So what’s the difference between the L and LE? The LE buys you a standard automatic transmission, body colored mirrors, a better radio (L and LE both have standard USB/iPod jacks), a driver’s seat with 2 more directions of motion, a 60/40 folding rear seat (the L’s rear seat folds flat as one unit), audio controls on the steering wheel, chrome door handles, Bluetooth speakerphone, power windows and remote keyless entry. The price for these jewels? $1,510.

Click here to view the embedded video.

It moves!

The Yaris has an engine! The 3-door and 5-door Yaris share the same thoroughly modern 1.5L four-cylinder engine with variable valve timing. The 106HP come to the boil at 6,000 RPM but despite this, it isn’t as “peaky” as many small engines. Torque is rated at 103 lb-ft at a lower 4,200 RPM. I’d like to say this makes the Yaris quick off the line, but the lack of a tach really hampered my fun with the 5-speed manual. Adding insult to injury, our LE tester mates the modern engine with an ancient 4-speed automatic. The lack of cogs is the most likely reason the Yaris misses the 40MPG mark with the 5-speed manual posting 30MPG city and 38MPG highway and the automatic dropping to a ho-hum 30MPG city and 35MPG highway according to the EPA. I experienced an average of 31MPG on my daily commute. If these numbers bother you, then you’re missing the point of the Yaris which strangely enough isn’t to be the most efficient small Toyota, but the cheapest to buy.

It Turns!

Out on the road the Yaris’s short 98.8-inch wheelbase, light curb weight of 2,300lbs and somewhat stiff springs combine to make for a choppy ride on washboard pavement. All 3-door Yaris models come with 10-inch vented discs up front, drum brakes out back and 175 width, 65 series tires on steel wheels. Despite being shod with tall all-season rubber, the lightweight Yaris handles surprisingly well with a well-balanced chassis, direct (albeit numb) steering and a tight 30-foot turning radius. Thanks to the fairly wide stance and “wheels in the corners” design, the 3-door is actually a willing companion when the going gets twisty. Because the chassis is a willing dance partner on windy mountain roads, the budget nature of the braking system becomes more obvious than in the previous generation with smoke and fade following a session of aggressive corner carving. While I doubt many shoppers will feel the need to push their subcompact to the limits, beware that the chassis writes checks the brakes can’t cash.

There’s competition!

While many Toyota shoppers are brand monogamists who won’t so much as look at another woman car, the Yaris is positioned as an entry-level vehicle hoping to attract the younger generation and train them to be a lifelong Toyota customer. While it’s easy to compare the 5-door Yaris to the slick 5-door Hyundai Accent with its refined interior and more efficient and powerful drivetrain, it has a few too many doors. Indeed, all the competition save the Fiat 500 and Golf have too many doors. Compared to the Golf (starting at $17,995) the Yaris’ cheaper interior and old-school cog swapper can be forgiven because of the low sticker price, and compared to the Fiat, the Yaris is simply more car. In many ways the Yaris’ fiercest competitor is in the family: the all-new Prius c. Based loosely on the unholy marriage of a Yaris and a Prius to begin with, the baby Prius starts at $18,950 and with a solid 50MPG average (as tested by TTAC) vs the Yaris’ 30MPG average (as tested by TTAC), it wouldn’t take long to save the $3,325 difference in MSRP.

I started scratching my head about the Yaris at the release event for the Prius c a few months ago and after spending a week in the Yaris I’m more confused then when I started. It’s not the Yaris’ fault. It’s a cheap car that fulfills the mission of cheap and cheerful transportation with a totally unexpected dose of fun and simplicity. The problem is Toyota makes a much better car; the Prius c. With 50 MPG on tap and $4.40 gasoline in Northern California it would only take 55,500 miles to break even. If you’re worried about a loss of fun, despite the 200lb heavier curb weight of the Prius c, it handles almost as well as the Yaris and the hybrid drivetrain actually helps solve the braking complaints. If you’re in the market for a compact car, it seems the Yaris is really only a good option if you really want a new car but can’t stretch yourself to the Prius c or one of the other more premium subcompact options.

Toyota provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30: 3.05 seconds

0-60: 9.0 seconds

1/4 Mile: 17.02 seconds @ 79.5MPH

Average economy: 30.5MPG over 689 miles

 

2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, rear 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, rear, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Engine, 1.5L 106HP, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Engine, 1.5L 106HP, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, wheel, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, gauges, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, instrument cluster, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, front , Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, rear 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, rear 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, rear 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, side 3/4, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Exterior, rear, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, dashboard, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, driver's side dash, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, dashboard, radio, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, dashboard, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, rear seats, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, rear seats, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2012 Toyota Yaris 3-Door, Interior, cargo area, Photography Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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