The Truth About Cars » Toyota Corona http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:27:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars » Toyota Corona http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com Junkyard Find: 1966 Toyota Corona Sedan http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/03/junkyard-find-1966-toyota-corona-sedan/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/03/junkyard-find-1966-toyota-corona-sedan/#comments Tue, 18 Mar 2014 13:00:13 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=774737 03 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinAs I always mention when writing about the the Toyota Corona, my first car was a beige ’69 four-door. Examples of the first generation of the Corona sold in the United States remain defiantly uncollectible for the most part (though a few do get restored and/or customized here and there), which means that beat-up ones wash ashore at self-service wrecking yards when they no longer serve as cheap transportation. In this series so far, we’ve seen this ’68 sedan, this ’70 sedan, this ’70 coupe, and this bonus Corona ad from the February 1969 issue of Playboy. Today’s find is the result of an archeological expedition into an old backup hard drive dating from early 2007, so this California Corona was shredded and put on a container ship in the Port of Oakland about seven years back.
01 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinWhen I saw this car at the now-defunct Hayward Pick-Your-Part, I had a crazy idea that I was looking at my very first car (which I hadn’t seen since 1984). The color was right and the body damage looked familiar… but my car had a four-on-the-floor manual transmission, and this one had a three- or four-on-the-tree column shifter. Plus, closer examination showed that this car has no rear side marker lights (required on US-market cars starting in 1968) and a different grille.
02 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinYes, column-shift manual-transmission Toyotas as late as 1966. The Corona, with its leaf-spring rear and coil-on-top-of-upper-control-arm front suspension, was mechanically pretty similar to the 1961 Ford Fairlane (though the Powerglide-based Toyoglide automatic transmission gave some Coronas more of a GM feel). The whole package seemed like sort of a 3/4-scale early-60s American sedan.
06 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinThe first Coronas were imported into the US for the 1965 model year, so this ’66 is one of the first to reach these shores. I’m sure The Crusher ate some parts on this car that are now much-sought-after by the world’s handful of T40 Corona fanatics.
04 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee MartinThere’s not much demand for the pushrod 3R engine, though. This ancestor of the SOHC 20R and 22R engines was just as reliable as the later Hilux and Celica motors, but was even noisier and less happy being spun past 3,000 RPM.

01 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 02 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 03 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 04 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 05 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 06 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 07 - 1969 Toyota Corona Sedan Down on the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin ]]>
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Adventures In Marketing: 1970 Toyota Corona Beats Green Monster Jet Car In Drag Race http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/09/adventures-in-marketing-1970-toyota-corona-beats-green-monster-jet-car-in-drag-race/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/09/adventures-in-marketing-1970-toyota-corona-beats-green-monster-jet-car-in-drag-race/#comments Fri, 13 Sep 2013 13:00:34 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=516745 1970_Toyota_Corona_Commercial-Picture courtesy of Toyota USASince my first car was a 1969 Toyota Corona sedan, I always look for these cars in junkyards. I toy with the idea of getting another first-gen Corona sedan someday, into which I will swap a 1UZ-FE engine out of a Lexus LS400, so of course I check the internetz for old Corona ads. Here’s a good one!

Yes, the ’70 Corona sedan beats the mighty F-104-engined Green Monster LSR car in all categories, including a 98-yard drag race (in which the Corona gets about a 95-yard head start). As for trunk space and ease of parking… well, you’re better off with a Corona than a jet dragster any day!

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Junkyard Find: 1968 Toyota Corona Sedan http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/12/junkyard-find-1968-toyota-corona-sedan/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/12/junkyard-find-1968-toyota-corona-sedan/#comments Mon, 31 Dec 2012 14:00:15 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=471999 Since my first car was a Corona and I’ve had quite a bumper crop of Corona Junkyard Finds this year (including this ’79 LE sedan, this ’70 sedan, and this ’70 coupe, the last of the 2012 Junkyard Find Series might as well be this ’68 sedan.
This example of Toyota’s first big seller in the United States (Crowns were always very rare and Corollas didn’t get to be big US sellers until the 1970s), which I found at the site of our Auction-To-Crusher study, came with the transmission whose name I love most of all: Toyoglide!
The Toyoglide was a license-built version of GM’s venerable two-speed Powerglide. Yes, even as Land Cruisers got a Toyota-ized Chevy six engine, Coronas got GM transmissions.
The 3R pushrod engine was noisy and not so powerful, but it did sport the reliability the R family is known for (unless entered in a 24 Hours of LeMons race).
My ’69 Corona wasn’t particularly reliable except for the engine, and overall it was just about as terrible as the Pintos and Colts driven by my high-school peers. It took the Corolla and Celica and some cockroach-like pickups, a few years later, to get Toyota its American reputation for build quality.
Still, the boxy little Corona was the first real toehold in the American market for Toyota.

01 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 02 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 03 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 04 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 05 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 06 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 07 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 08 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 09 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 10 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 11 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 12 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 13 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 14 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 15 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 16 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 17 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 18 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 19 - 1968 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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Junkyard Find: 1982 Toyota Corona Luxury Edition http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/12/junkyard-find-1982-toyota-corona-luxury-edition/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/12/junkyard-find-1982-toyota-corona-luxury-edition/#comments Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:00:34 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=469889 As I always mention every time I write about the Toyota Corona, my very first car was a 50-buck ’69 Corona sedan, and so I always notice them. You don’t see many Coronas these days, though I’ve managed to find this ’70 coupe, this ’70 sedan, and this ’79 sedan in wrecking yards during the last year. All three of those cars were in Northern California, but today’s Junkyard Find awaits The Crusher’s jaws in Colorado.
1982 was the last model year for Corona sales in the United States; the front-wheel-drive Camry took over the rear-drive Corona’s role the following year. By current Lexus standards, the luxury in this “Luxury Edition” wasn’t particularly plush.
This AC switch looks very familiar to me, and it should— I used the same switch as the main power control on the Junkyard Boogaloo Boombox, which even now provides music in the Murilee Martin Lifestyle Brand™ garage.
In addition to refrigerated air, the Luxury Edition Corona also came with a rear defroster.
Somebody (probably a Toyota truck owner) has already grabbed the 22R engine out of this car.
Not only does this car come with a Grapic Equalizer With Amplifier, it has a Phase Diffusion button. Ah, the early 1980s!

22 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 01 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 02 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 03 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 04 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 05 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 06 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 07 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 08 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 09 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 10 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 11 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 12 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 13 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 14 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 15 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 16 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 17 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 18 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 19 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 20 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin 21 - 1982 Toyota Corona Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee Martin Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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1969: Toyota Corona Gives You Go! http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/06/1969-toyota-corona-gives-you-go/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/06/1969-toyota-corona-gives-you-go/#comments Wed, 13 Jun 2012 14:45:05 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=448707 A generous 24 Hours of LeMons racer gave me a copy of the February 1969 issue of Playboy as a gift last weekend, and it’s even more of a time capsule than most publications of its era. The only cars advertised in the issue are the Ford Mustang (Mach 1 and Shelby), Volkswagen Beetle, Datsun 510 (labeled as the “/2″), and the Toyota Corona. Since my very first car was a ’69 Corona, I felt compelled to share this ad.
0-60 in 16 seconds. 25 miles per gallon. Top speed of 90 MPH. Toyoglide transmission with two forward gears. Hmmm… those numbers don’t sound so great.
Other than this one, I haven’t seen a Corona coupe of this era for many years.
1969 Toyota Corona Advertisement - Picture courtesy of Toyota - 4 1969 Toyota Corona Advertisement - Picture courtesy of Toyota - 2 1969 Toyota Corona Advertisement - Picture courtesy of Toyota - 3 Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail

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1979: You Asked For It, You Got… a Toyota Corona Liftback Sedan? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/04/1979-you-asked-for-it-you-got-a-toyota-corona-liftback-sedan/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/04/1979-you-asked-for-it-you-got-a-toyota-corona-liftback-sedan/#comments Wed, 04 Apr 2012 14:15:35 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=438093 The Junkyard Find ’79 Corona we saw earlier was a pretty nice car, but it was a regular sedan with an old-fashioned trunk. Just as Chevrolet buyers could buy a Nova with a hatchback in 1979, Toyota shoppers had the option of getting a Corona Liftback. Let’s tune into the old days of analog television and watch how Toyota USA’s marketers pitched this fine automobile.

So, we have a mean-looking tough old guy with a combover— probably just got back from advising the Proceso on interrogation techniques in Buenos Aires, from the look of him— driving a ’79 Corona Liftback around a suburban American neighborhood. Through clenched teeth, he commands the viewer to get with the program and buy this extremely sensible car. Few viewers did.

Now, let’s watch an ad for a same-year Detroit (or, rather, Franco-Detroit) hatchback. You get facts and figures, twisty roads, interesting camera angles, and a voiceover that doesn’t sound like Dick Cheney as president of your homeowners’ association, berating you over the dandelions on your lawn.

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Junkyard Find: 1979 Toyota Corona LE Sedan http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/04/junkyard-find-1979-toyota-corona-le-sedan/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/04/junkyard-find-1979-toyota-corona-le-sedan/#comments Wed, 04 Apr 2012 13:00:51 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=438072 We saw a Crusher-bound 1970 Corona last week, but that wasn’t the only 1970s Corona in this particular Northern California wrecking yard. A few rows away was this equally beige, but much larger and more sophisticated, ’79.
By the end of the 1970s, the Corona wasn’t selling so well in the United States. American car shoppers with fat wallets and a yen for a luxurious-yet-sensible Japanese sedan went for the Cressida, cheapskate car shoppers who still wanted Toyota reliability went for the Corolla, and everyone else bought Malibus and Diplomats. A few years later, the Camry showed up… and that was it for the Corona in North America.
The 20R engine wasn’t exactly smooth, but thousands of Hilux-driving warlords can vouch for its reliability.
This survivor of the streets of San Francisco may have been running just fine at the end; it doesn’t take much for the parking tickets to build up, and the next stop (unless the owner has thousands of bucks to pay The Man) is the the towed-cars auction.

17 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 01 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 02 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 04 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 05 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 06 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 07 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 08 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 09 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 10 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 11 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 12 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 14 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 15 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden 16 - 1979 Toyota Corona Down on the Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phil 'Murilee Martin' Greden Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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Junkyard Find: 1970 Toyota Corona Sedan http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/03/junkyard-find-1970-toyota-corona-sedan/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/03/junkyard-find-1970-toyota-corona-sedan/#comments Wed, 28 Mar 2012 13:00:47 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=436837 I visited my old stomping grounds in California over the weekend, which means I hit a bunch of self-service junkyards in the East Bay. I was thinking about some of the cars I used to drive during the 80s as I walked the rows of this yard’s import section, when there it was: my very first car!
No, really— I was convinced I’d stumbled on the actual beige Toyota Corona with 1900 engine and 4-speed that I bought for $50 at age 15. I sold it to a classmate at 17 (he ended up going to jail for homicide a year later, but I’m pretty sure the Corona wasn’t involved in the crime) and have spent the last 29 years wondering what happened to it.
Upon closer examination, it became clear that this wasn’t my old car; the first clue was when I didn’t spot the punk door-panel murals (honoring Fang, if I recall correctly) done in sparkly nail polish applied by back-seat passengers in 1982. A look at the data plate confirmed it: Mine was a ’69 and this car is a ’70. Hey, maybe my ’69 is still out there somewhere!
So this is the second 1970 Corona I’ve seen in Northern California junkyards in recent months, after this coupe. The Corona doesn’t have much collectible value to anybody outside of Japan, so the only way an American Corona can last this long is when it never dies. Since they’re hammer-simple and have Hilux-grade R engines, this does happen… but eventually some repair will cost more than the car is worth: next stop, The Crusher!
The early Corona was the Camry of its day— homely, not very exciting to drive, and extremely reliable. I hope there are a few low-mile original ones still hidden away.

27 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 01 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 02 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 03 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 04 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 05 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 06 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 07 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 08 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 09 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 10 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 11 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 12 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 13 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 14 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 15 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 16 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 17 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 18 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 19 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 20 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 21 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 22 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 23 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 24 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 25 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 26 - 1970 Toyota Corona Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'King of Corona' Greden 82_Toyota_Corona 1970-Toyota-Corona-Down-On-courtesy-of-Phillip-King-thumb Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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Junkyard Find: 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/02/junkyard-find-1970-toyota-corona-coupe/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/02/junkyard-find-1970-toyota-corona-coupe/#comments Tue, 14 Feb 2012 14:00:18 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=430760 The Corona was the first Toyota car to appear in large numbers on American streets, starting in the mid-to-late 1960s. By the middle of the 1980s, just about all the boxy early Coronas were gone; they rusted quickly in non-bone-dry regions and weren’t enough loved elsewhere to be kept alive. My very first car was a ’69 Corona sedan, so I had a bit of a nostalgic twinge when I spotted this ’70 hardtop coupe in a California self-serve wrecking yard.
I started driving my Corona in 1982, at which time it was regarded by my peers as possibly the uncoolest motor vehicle on the planet. It wasn’t exactly a serious driver’s car, what with the 67-horsepower 3R engine, tippy suspension, and fade-prone four-wheel-drum brakes, but at least mine had a four-on-the-floor manual.
This sporty coupe came with the floor-shifted Toyoglide two-speed automatic, a Powerglide license-built by Toyota. Performance must have been sluggish, even by 1970 standards.
The fold-down rear seat was a nice cargo-hauling touch.
Because the paint is very faded and there was a 1982 bus map in the glovebox, I’m assuming that this car sat in a yard or driveway for decades before taking its final trip to The Crusher.
With a five-digit odometer, there’s no telling how many miles this car really racked up during its driving career. 113,242? 413,242? I’m betting on the former.

22 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 02 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 03 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 04 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 05 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 06 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 07 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 08 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 09 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 10 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 11 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 12 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 13 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 14 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 15 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 16 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 17 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 18 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 19 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 20 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden 21 - 1970 Toyota Corona Coupe Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Corona King' Greden Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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Question of the Day: Can You Find a Diecast Replica of Your First Car? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/question-of-the-day-can-you-find-a-diecast-replica-of-your-first-car/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/question-of-the-day-can-you-find-a-diecast-replica-of-your-first-car/#comments Tue, 30 Aug 2011 22:00:40 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=409235 After I started getting weird diecast toy cars as LeMons Supreme Court baksheesh, my office has become crowded with stuff like a 1:43 scale Leyland P76 and a 1:40 Nissan Prairie. Yesterday, as I pondered the diecast custom vans that got away, I wondered: is it possible to get a diecast toy version of my very first car?
Sure enough, it is! Thing is, the toy version costs $49.99 shipped, or exactly one cent less than I paid for my ’69 Corona sedan back in 1982. There’s no way in hell I’m paying that much for a toy version of a car that was so ill-handling, underpowered, and shoddily built that the Toyoda family would be wise to buy every last survivor and crush it, for the sake of what’s left of the company’s good name… well, except for the fact that it’s impossible for a car freak not to love his or her very first car, no matter how terrible. So, how about you? If your first car was a Volkswagen Beetle or Ford Mustang, you’re in good shape. If it was a Matra Bagheera, on the other hand— hey, you’re still covered!

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Roger Moore Gets 10,000 Pounds of Turbo Boost In His ’82 Corona GT http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/02/roger-moore-gets-10000-pounds-of-turbo-boost-in-his-82-corona-gt/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/02/roger-moore-gets-10000-pounds-of-turbo-boost-in-his-82-corona-gt/#comments Tue, 15 Feb 2011 18:00:44 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=383971
American car ads of the early 1980s came up short in several departments: Burning rubber, jet-engine-grade turbocharger sound, and blatantly sped-up film that made the cars appear to be going 300 MPH. Oh, and they also lacked James Bond!

Since my very first set of wheels was a 50-buck ’69 Corona sedan, I have a soft spot for the not-so-sporty rear-drive Toyota sedans. Not-so-sporty in North America, that is; 1982 car shoppers could still buy a new Corona— in theory, though almost never in practice— but the versions we got were hopelessly stodgy, more suited for the regional sales manager of a faltering plumbing-supply company than, say, a Yakuza enforcer in a $10,000 Italian suit. Not so in Japan, where you could buy a mean-looking Corona GT coupe with “TWIN CAM TURBO” in bright orange letters on the steering wheel and ten billion whistling horsepower under the hood. Well, maybe not quite ten billion horsepower; with the 3T-GTE, Roger Moore was getting 160 PS (about 157 HP) when he leadfooted it out of the TWIN CAM TURBO 18-wheeler in search of baddies. That’s still plenty of power for the time, especially in a 2,500-pound car.

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Stolen Cassette Deck Karma Goes Around, Comes Around http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/12/stolen-cassette-deck-karma-goes-around-comes-around/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/12/stolen-cassette-deck-karma-goes-around-comes-around/#comments Tue, 28 Dec 2010 14:00:35 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=378749
One thing that really sucked about the pre-MP3 era was that it was a huge hassle to get your car a cheap source of music that didn’t sound terrible. As I gather components to set up my Dodge A100 Hell Project with an ironic 8-track setup, I’m forced to recall the hot cassette deck that was more or less forced into my not-so-willing hands back in 1982.

My first car was a 50-buck 1969 Toyota Corona sedan. It came with a factory AM radio (with the CONELRAD stations indicated by Civil-Defense symbols) in the dash, which meant I could listen to scratchy, mono-dash-speaker stuff like Joan Jett’s “I Love Rock-N-Roll” on KFRC.

It also came with an underdash Kraco 8-track player. By the early 1980s, 8-tracks had become laughably obsolete (but not yet ironic-hipster cool), and no 16-year-old wanted to be seen with an 8-track tape in his or her possession. That would be as humiliating a 16-year-old having a Zune now. Being broke, I picked up a genuinely lo-fi piece of audio hardware for $1.50 from the U-Pull yard on 85th Avenue in east Oakland: a cassette-to-8-track adapter. Yes, such devices actually existed, and they almost worked! Well, no, they didn’t.

Cassettes sucked, too, but they sucked less than 8-tracks (this Non/Boyd Rice tape is the only store-bought cassette I can dig up at this hour; I’ve given up finding an image of the X cassette I really wanted for this rant). What I needed was a proper cassette deck for my Corona, so I could crank the Dead Kennedys and Motörhead as I cruised Park Street with a mighty 1900 cubic centimeters of Toyota R power at my command. Back then, however, you couldn’t even get an off-brand Taiwanese Staticblaster cassette player for the kind of money I was able to scrape up from my after-school job stocking the beer fridge at the Herpes Central Beach And Tennis Club Bar, not if you were trying to save up the cash to buy a ’71 Satellite with header-equipped 318. Junkyard decks weren’t much cheaper, not if they worked. What to do?

I figured something would come up, but my friend “Sick Dog” (second from left in the yearbook photo of my crypto-Baja-ized ’58 Beetle, above) couldn’t stand riding in my car and being forced to listen to “Kill The Poor” through a warbly-ass 8-track adapter and decided to take decisive action. This decisive action consisted of Sick Dog ripping off the cassette deck from a Capri II owned by a young woman who lived next door; he believed that she had once called the cops on him for doing bleach burnouts in his (six-cylinder) ’68 Mustang and thus deserved to get her Capri de-stereo-ized. Dressed all in black, including ski mask— he was on a mission, you see— he coat-hangered his way into the car and spent hours silently dismantling the dash and removing the Realistic cassette deck. Next day at school, filled with pride, he handed me a paper bag containing the stereo. “Let’s install it tonight!” I was horrified, but what could I do? Rat off my best friend to The Man? I told him he was an asshole. “What’s done is done,” he replied, “Now you’ve got tunes, dude!”

So, we rigged up the cassette deck in place of the AM radio in the Corona, using some junkyard speakers sitting in holes crudely hacked into the rear package shelf with a jigsaw. Powering it up, we discovered that it had a cassette inside. Not just any cassette, in fact— this was one of the greatest albums ever recorded: X’s 1980 masterpiece, Los Angeles. I’d heard of X— they were starting to get medium-big in Northern California with Under The Big Black Sun around that time— but I had never listened to Los Angeles all the way through. It immediately became my favorite tape and went on many road trips over the next 20 years (it was finally eaten by a tape-hungry boombox in my ’76 Nova)… but I always felt a twinge of guilt, thinking about the poor Capri-driving woman losing both her stereo and (what I’ve always assumed was) her favorite cassette. Actually, more than a twinge of guilt; there have been times that I’ve felt like the protagonist of an Edgar Allen Poe story, being stalked by a ghost who hums “Johnny Hit And Run Pauline” while dragging chains over an endless expanse of busted tape decks.

I’ve often wondered if Sick Dog, who grew up into a reasonably law-abiding guy, feels bad about his youthful stereo theft, or if he even remembers it. For my part, I can tell you that there is such a thing as Hot Cassette Deck Karma; I’ve had plenty of cassette players ripped off from my vehicles over the years. Sure, living in urban-entrepreneur-heavy San Francisco and Oakland had something to do with it, but the real reason was the straight-outta-Poe ghost leading miscreants to my parked car. It’s been at least 10 years since I’ve had a car stereo theft, so the Tape Deck Ghost appears to believe that my half-dozen disappeared cassette players was a sufficient price to pay for the tainted deck in my Corona.

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