The Truth About Cars » LS400 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Wed, 23 Apr 2014 16:58:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.1 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars » LS400 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com 90s Japanese Luxury Car Purchase Dilemma Solved: Going VIP! http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/02/90s-japanese-luxury-car-purchase-dilemma-solved-going-vip/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/02/90s-japanese-luxury-car-purchase-dilemma-solved-going-vip/#comments Thu, 16 Feb 2012 19:15:10 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=431098 Back in September, I wrote about my search for a 1990s Japanese luxury car as a daily driver, with the Infiniti Q45, Lexus LS400, and Acura RL as the main contenders. Five months later, I’ve made my choice. It’s a 1997 Coach Edition Lexus LS400 in nice shape, 120,000 miles. Man, this car has class.. The reason I’m getting this LS is to allow me to immobilize my ’92 Civic long enough to swap the Integra GS-R engine into it, which means I won’t be doing any customizing that takes it out of commission for long periods. That doesn’t mean I’ll be leaving it dead stock, of course…
I’ve become fascinated by the Japanese VIP Style fashion for car customization, spending a lot of time looking at the Junction Produce site and various Japanese VIP car publications. I won’t be doing anything particularly radical to my Lexus in terms of ride height or suspension mods (I want it to ride the way Toyota intended), but I will need some better wheels, and Celsior grille and badges… and a fusa.

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Piston Slap: The Oxygen Network http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/12/piston-slap-the-oxygen-network/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/12/piston-slap-the-oxygen-network/#comments Wed, 02 Dec 2009 23:54:17 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=337744 Beats me! (courtesy:autoland.us)

TTAC Commentator xyzzy writes:

One of the O2 sensors on my 1998 Lexus LS400 recently failed, throwing a P0161 OBDII code (at 175K miles). I’ve cleared the code and verified it comes back, so I don’t think it’s a transient failure. I haven’t yet replaced it, but I have noticed that my gas mileage, as reported on the trip computer, has improved significantly since the failure. Before it was 23-24 mpg, now I’m looking at 26. I know that one of the functions of the O2 sensor is to help regulate mixture, so I’m guessing the mixture is now leaner without one of the O2 sensors. I’ve noticed no discernable change in performance of the car. Assuming I can clear the error code before taking it in for OBDII emissions inspection, is there a downside to just leaving it and running aggressively lean (if that’s in fact what’s happening)?

Sajeev answers:

If your O2 sensors have 175k on their tickers, you’re asking the wrong questions. But the answer to all questions is the same: replace the O2 sensors. That’s all four of them, partner.

Running old O2 sensors is like running an out of tune carburetor. Some manufacturers recommend changing them after 50k for peak efficiency, but I’d recommend every 100-150k for any application. (i.e. When your ride goes in the shop or you are motivated to spend some quality time underneath it.)

Even if the sensors are “good,” you can’t clear an OBD-II error code and pass an inspection: do so and the service tech gets a message saying the vehicle isn’t ready to test. So they’ll take your money for the privilege, then promptly fail your car…and ask you to come back after a week of driving. And, again, the code shall magically resurface.

Or conversely, it behooves you to do the right thing. Bite the bullet, and do a tune up (O2 sensors at the bare minimum) on this car.

[Send your queries to mehta@ttac.com]

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