The Truth About Cars » IS 350 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Sun, 05 Jul 2015 18:22:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars » IS 350 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com 2015 Lexus IS 350 F Sport Review (With Video) http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/05/2015-lexus-350-f-sport-review-video/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/05/2015-lexus-350-f-sport-review-video/#comments Mon, 04 May 2015 12:00:34 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=1056498 BMW moved over 140,000 3-Series’ last year in America. They didn’t do this by being the most luxurious option or by being the best handling option. (The truth is hard to hear, I’m sorry.) Instead, BMW did this by doing exactly what shoppers asked for; luxury car buyers want a comfy ride with a luxury logo […]

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2015 Lexus IS 350 F-Sport Exterior -002

BMW moved over 140,000 3-Series’ last year in America. They didn’t do this by being the most luxurious option or by being the best handling option. (The truth is hard to hear, I’m sorry.) Instead, BMW did this by doing exactly what shoppers asked for; luxury car buyers want a comfy ride with a luxury logo on the front, good fuel economy and to read reviews that extol the track-day virtues of their car of choice. The average buyer will never be on a track, but it’s critical to know your car belongs there.

What BMW dealers don’t want you to know: there are two sedans in this segment that are arguably better on the track than a 328i or 335i and we’re talking about one of them today, the IS 350 F Sport.

Exterior

Lexus’ exterior styling used to strike me as graceful, sophisticated and reserved. Apparently, however, the front end got no respect on the Autobahn, so the F Sport nose was created. While I can’t say if it commands more respect in Germany, the ginormous grille on our IS 350 F Sport looked ready to devour small children and subcompact cars alike. While some folks have said they dislike the gaping maw, I actually like it. What I’m not a fan of are the separate headlamp and “Nike-swoosh” daytime running lamp modules; I find the look a little discordant. Whether you like it or not, you have to admit this front end is more dramatic than anything on offer from BMW, Mercedes, Audi or Infiniti.

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Out back, less has changed, with the rear being more reserved than the front. But it’s the side profile where things really divert. The IS is 3.5 inches longer than the last generation model and most of the increase goes to the rear seat area – although, some of it also goes to the trunk, making the IS look more balanced than before. Thanks to pedestrian impact regulations in Europe, the front end has become blunter (just as we have seen from the Europeans lately), which actually helps the front 3/4 view. I think the Cadillac ATS is the most attractive sedan in this segment, but the IS in F Sport trim leaps up the scale to number 3, just behind the ATS and 3-Series.

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Interior

While BMW and Audi have opted for an open and expansive interior theme, the IS feels tight and close to the driver by design with a high beltline and tall center console. F Sport models get a configurable LCD disco dash instead of the white-on-black gauges we normally expect from the brand. Similar to Volvo’s new LCD instrument cluster, the display can seem a little lost in the binnacle as the binnacle normally houses a wider traditional dial cluster. Since Cadillac has yet to move their large LCD instrument cluster down-market to the ATS, there really isn’t any competition for this display at the moment.

As you’d expect from Lexus, one can still get acres of stained wood and soft leather, but neither are standard. Like most entries in this segment, leather is reserved for specific packages and wood is an optional upgrade. Front seat comfort proved excellent during my week. The sport seats easily bested the Audi A4, Cadillac ATS and the base seats in the BMW 328i or Mercedes C300. Wider folks should know that the bolstering is pronounced and the F Sport trim doesn’t have an option to delete the sport seats.

Thanks to the wheelbase stretch, combined legroom is up by 2.6 inches inside which places the IS towards the top of the group in total legrooom. Nobody expected the BMW 3-Series to grow as much as it did in its latest incarnation, which becomes quite obvious when you run the numbers. The 3-Series boasts the second best legroom figures behind the much larger Infiniti Q50. The Lexus offers a slightly larger trunk, but I found the overall trunk dimensions to be more advantageous in the BMW.

2015 Lexus IS 350 F-Sport Interior -003

Infotainment

The 2014 redesign of the IS brought a raft of new features from traffic maps on non-navigation equipped models to predictive traffic, improved voice recognition and smartphone integration. Alas, the lord giveth and he taketh away. Along with the new software comes Lexus’ Remote Touch input device, or as I prefer to call it: the Lexus joystick. I find little joy in the mouse-like controller, but it is better than the trackpad you find in the NX. The controller is the textbook example of the difference between an intuitive input method and one that is optimized for use in a car. The joystick is intuitive, it’s just not well suited to a vehicle as it requires much more eye-off-the-road time. I grabbed a few friends and had them perform a few identical functions in the Lexus and a BMW with iDrive while I watched their eyes. It simply takes longer for you to find what you need in the Lexus system. Oddly enough, the same Lexus software without a touchscreen is one of the least distracting available, but you can only get that in the GX and LX. If you don’t buy navigation, you still get the 7-inch screen but trade the joystick for a rotary knob.

Lexus doesn’t offer any sort of heads-up display a la BMW, but you can gadgets like radar cruise control, Mark Levinson branded audio system, blind spot monitoring and lane departure warning.

2015 Lexus IS 350 F-Sport Engine-004

Engine

Standing somewhat alone in this segment is a 100-percent naturally-aspirated engine lineup. While everyone but Infiniti has moved to a turbo four to fill the bottom end, Lexus has stuck with their tiny V6. (I’m not counting the 2.5-liter four-banger in the base ATS. Why? Who would?) Displacing 2.5 liters and sporting direct injection, the IS 250 is good for 204 ponies and 185 lb-ft of torque. [It’s the least powerful V6 currently on sale. -Ed] While many in the industry would once have complained about a base luxury model without an inline-6 engine, this V6 now competes with four-cylinder engines. Although a V6 isn’t as balanced as an I6, it’s miles ahead of an I4. The model we tested is the 3.5-liter V6 IS 350. Adding a liter bumps power to 306 and torque to 277. For reasons known only to Lexus’ product planning team, the 220 horsepower IS 300h remains forbidden fruit on our shores.

Lexus tends to be a cautious company when it comes to adopting new technology and, as a result, the 2.5-liter V6 and AWD models of the 3.5-liter have to make do with ye olde 6-speed automatic from Aisin. If you get the RWD version of the IS 350 that we tested, you get Aisin’s new 8-speed auto, a variant of the transmission used in the Corvette and select Cadillacs.

2015 Lexus IS 350 F-Sport Instrument Cluster_

Drive

The naturally aspirated engine lineup is the first thing you will notice about the IS out on the road. Much like the 3.6-liter V6 in the ATS and the 3.7-liter V6 in the Q50, power builds in a linear fashion. This is quite different from the C400, 335i and other turbo entries which typically have torque and horsepower “plateaus” with sharp drops on either end. 0-60 acceleration in our F Sport tester came in at 5.6 seconds – not a bad time by any stretch. However, Volvo’s front-wheel-drive S60 T6 Drive-e will do the same sprint in 5.4. The purist in me prefers the feel and unadulterated sound a naturally-aspirated engine delivers, but the pragmatist in me realizes the C400, 335i, S4 and S60 T6 will all beat the IS to the freeway ramp. Opting for Lexus’ AWD system improves grip, but the loss of two gears causes the 0-60 time to stretch to 5.7 seconds, getting close to the less powerful BMW 328xi. AWD shoppers also have to live with an odd hump in the front foot-well caused by the transfer case and driveshaft to the front axle.

The responsiveness of the IS in tight corners demonstrates how much time Lexus spent engineering the suspension. The old IS came across as isolated, perhaps even sloppy, while this chassis is sharp and crisp. Every system feels like a team player, from the suspension to the transmission shift logic and the revised double-wishbones up front. The IS quite simply delivers the best feel in the corners and out on the track with every system tuned to near perfection. (Bear in mind we still have electric power steering, so it’s all relative.) The IS actually manages to feel a hair more precise, although not as engaging, than the E90 3-Series (previous generation). The F30 (current generation) has traded handling prowess for a softer ride and a ginormous back seat. And therein lies the rub: the change has improved BMW’s sales rather than stopping the gravy train. Meanwhile, the Audi and Volvo plow like a John Deere when they encounter a corner and the Mercedes feels just as you would expect – heavy and soft. The purist in me prefers the crisp handling and impeccable feel of the IS on a track. The pragmatist in me is keenly aware that feel doesn’t actually get you around a track. That’s where power comes in. Because of the power deficit, the 335i, S60 T6 AWD, C400 and S4 are all faster around your average track. If you’re talking autocross, the IS has a chance, but even the Volvo will beat it around Laguna Seca.

2015 Lexus IS 350 F-Sport Headlamps

Competition

Comparing the IS 350 with the 335i seems like the natural thing to do – after all, they both have “3” in the model number – but a more apt comparison is the 328i. The IS 350 slots between the 328i and the 335i in both price and performance, but price is critical. Meanwhile IS 250 performs more like the 320i than the 328i.

The IS 350 F Sport manages to be a hair less than a comparably equipped 328i M-Sport, which is an excellent start. Despite costing a fraction less, the Lexus delivers considerably more refinement under the hood, better acceleration and more driving feel in the twisties. Our F Sport was notably less expensive than a Mercedes C300, and even when you add AWD to the Lexus, it’s still the more willing partner on your favorite mountain highway.

2015 Lexus IS 350 F-Sport Exterior -006

Audi’s A4 ends up being around the same price as the IS 350 while Volvo’s S60 is the discount option. Both the Audi and the Volvo start as FWD vehicles but add AWD to compensate for their front heavy designs. Unless you step up to the considerably more expensive S4, the Audi comes across as underpowered and all versions of the A4 feel nose heavy in comparison. The Volvo has a similar weight issue up front but the Swedes will happily drop a powerful turbo engine under the hood, mate it to AWD and sell it for less than the Lexus. The resulting S60 R-Design will out-pace the IS 350 F Sport but the experience will be much different. The Volvo will be understeering like mad in the corners; the IS will feel balanced and poised. Unfortunately, the Lexus’ driver will have to enjoy the feel while looking at the S60’s tail lamps.

The Infiniti Q50 is the often forgotten competitor. Nissan’s luxury arm has never quite reached the same status as Lexus as far as brand perception – perhaps that’s why. Never the less, the Infiniti has good looks and a low price tag on its side. Even the $37,150 base model starts with a 328 horsepower 3.7-liter V6. It’s still slower than BMW’s 335i, but at 5.2 seconds to 60, it is among the faster options. If you want more power and better economy, Infiniti will sell you their hybrid version that scoots to highway speed in 4.9. Comparably equipped, the Q50 is about $2,000 less than the F Sport we tested, making it the best RWD deal in this segment.

2015 Lexus IS 350 F-Sport Exterior -011

After a week with the IS 350, I’ll admit I was torn. The way the IS drives and feels on my mountain road commute is incredible. The way the IS feels on a track is alluring. And the value proposition is undeniable. Lexus’ well deserved reliability reputation and generally lower operating costs means the IS will cost less to own. All these things should mean my purist and pragmatic boxes will be well and truly checked. The Lexus has the luxury and track-day-diary cred to compete with the competition, but the infotainment system in the IS and slower 0-60 time keep the Lexus from being my choice in this segment. If my money were on the line, I’d live with Infiniti’s questionable steer-by-wire system and get the Q50S hybrid instead. You get more room inside, a 0-60 time matching the 335i and 31 MPG. While the IS 350 F Sport represents a good value against BMW’s volume 3-Series model, they still have nothing to compete properly with the 335i. Yes, the IS 350 F Sport feels better and road holds better than a comparably equipped 335i. But, as BMW has recently shown, perhaps going around a corner perfectly isn’t all that important after all.

 

 Lexus provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30: 2.2 Seconds

0-60: 5.6 Seconds

1/4 Mile: 14.8 Seconds at 100 MPH

Average Observed Economy: 20 MPG over 674 miles

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First Drive Review: 2014 Lexus IS (Video) http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/03/first-drive-review-2014-lexus-is-video/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/03/first-drive-review-2014-lexus-is-video/#comments Mon, 25 Mar 2013 15:34:56 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=481480 Every car company hates the BMW 3-Series. It’s always the benchmark, always the sales champion, always the golden boy. BMW shifted nearly 100,000 3-Series models in America last year and they did so not by being “the best” luxury sedan, but by pandering to the shopping public’s desires. Buyers have shown they want a comfy […]

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Every car company hates the BMW 3-Series. It’s always the benchmark, always the sales champion, always the golden boy. BMW shifted nearly 100,000 3-Series models in America last year and they did so not by being “the best” luxury sedan, but by pandering to the shopping public’s desires. Buyers have shown they want a comfy ride with a luxury logo on the front, they want good fuel economy and they want to hear journalists say how well the car handles on a track. The average buyer will never be on a track, but it’s critical to know your car belongs there. The old IS was a good car on the track, but its demure looks sold more on Lexus’ reliability and dealer reputation than the car’s track diaries. As we know from Volvo and Lexus’ sales numbers in this segment, two things don’t move metal: reliability and safety. For 2014 Lexus went back to the drawing board completely redesigning the IS sedan to be their most dynamic sedan ever. Does it have what it takes to take on the Germans and Infiniti’s new Q50?

Click here to view the embedded video.

Exterior

Let’s get the disclaimer out of the way up front: the IS-F and convertible IS C are continuing as-is for 2014. Lexus wouldn’t comment on any time-frames for their refresh, but you can bet nobody in Japan wants to keep stocking parts for both generations of IS vehicles. 

Lexus’ exterior styling has always stuck me as graceful, sophisticated and reserved. While that mantra holds true for the side profile of the IS, the front reveals the largest and most stylized grille, not just for Lexus, but for the whole small luxury segment. The photos above are of the F-Sport model which has a more aggressive “squiggle” grille rather than the more reserved horizontal lines of the regular IS. Regardless of the model you choose, this is one big maw. Lexus tells us the sloping profile and demure grill of the old IS, got no respect on the autobahn while this ginormous opening makes Germans run for their lives for fear of being devoured. That I believe. I tried to keep my distance for fear of being consumed myself. Whether you like the grille or not (I find it quite attractive on the F-Sport, a little unbalanced on the regular) our drive around Texas proved the grille received more looks than the old IS.

Out back, less has changed with the rear being more reserved than the front but it’s the side profile where things really change. The 2014 IS is a whopping 3.5 inches longer than the 2013 model and rides on a 2.7 inch longer wheelbase. Combined with the blunter nose which makes the hood look longer, the IS has gone from stubby to elegant. Remind you of anyone else in the segment? Yep, the BMW 3 grew by leaps and bounds last year. Unlike the Caddy designers who didn’t expect their target to shift so much, Lexus outpaced the 3 landing about an inch longer than the BMW.

Interior

Rather than evolving the IS interior, Lexus has gone for a revolution appearing to have changed absolutely everything about the IS’ interior. I’m not 100% sold on the design yet, mainly because of that enormous airbag bump on the passenger side. Unlike the Germans and Swedes that seem to enjoy using exactly the same interior design scaled up or down in every model, Lexus opts for similar cues but unique components. I give them credit for going this extra design mine but for my tastes I think I prefer something less avant-garde. But then again I own an X308 Jaguar XJ, the antithesis of modern.

Most companies would shy away from discussing their standard pleather seats but Lexus is a different sort of company and spoke at length about their NuLuxe faux-cowhide. In a further twist, F-Sport models eschew real leather for the fake. Thankfully this is one of the best leather look-alikes going and if you didn’t have a leather model on hand to compare it against you’d be hard pressed to tell the difference by touch. Smell is another thing, the NuLuxe interiors don’t have an unpleasant aroma, but its obviously not a leather smell. On the flip side Lexus tells us these are the first seats where the foam padding is molded into the upholstery fabric making the padding and the surface one unit. This supposedly will result in a longer lifetime and less “bunching” over time.

It’s hard to say what the IS would be like to live with since we had such a limited time with the car, so be sure to check back with us when we can snag one for a week. During our limited time in all varieties of IS, the front seats proved supportive with a nice range of motion although the seating position may be low for some drivers. Rear seat room has increased a much needed 1.6 inches while front legroom has gone up nearly an inch allowing a 6′ passenger (yours truly) to sit behind a 6’2 driver in relative comfort, a significant change from the last generation IS. Sadly however all that room had to come from somewhere and while some came from the wheelbase stretch, plenty came from the trunk as well with the cargo hold dropping from 13.3 cubes to 10.8 which is about 40% smaller than BMW’s cargo hold.

Infotainment & Gadgets

One item that hasn’t changed for the better (in my opinion) is the infotainment system. 2014 brings a raft of new features from traffic maps on non-navigation equipped models to predictive traffic, improved voice recognition and some slick smartphone app features. Alas, the lord giveth and he taketh away. Along with the new software comes Lexus’ Remote Touch input device, or as I prefer to call it: the Lexus joystick. Sadly I find little joy in the mouse-like controller. Don’t get me wrong, it is intuitive, I just don’t find it as easy to use as the competition’s knob interfaces and I think it takes way more eye-time off the road to use than Lexus’ old touchscreen systems. To counter this problem, the 7-inch LCD is placed higher the the dash where it looks small thanks to a housing that would appear to be designed to accommodate a larger screen. BMW’s wide-screen 8.8-inch display may not be that much bigger, but its up-close-and-personal location make it look large in comparison. In an odd twist if you don’t buy navigation you keep the 7-inch screen but trade the joystick for a rotary knob.

Since the systems we experienced were not production ready and not all the features were available for us to test but we were able to preview a number of features that may help soften the blow if you’re not a joystick fan. First up, the base IS models without navigation now get weather reports and a static traffic map updated via free HD Radio broadcasts so you don’t have to shell out for an XM subscription.You also get smartphone app integration standard with pass-though voice commands to supported phone apps. The optional navigation system sports improved graphics, redesigned menus making it easier to use the jotstick, more frequent live traffic updates and the ability to predict future traffic. The future traffic prediction feature uses historical data to show you what traffic will be like later and allow you to alter your travel plans accordingly. If outdated POI databases raise your hackles, the nav system will not simultaneously search the car’s POI database and an online POI database via your paired smartphone simultaneously and use the more recent search results.

Lexus doesn’t offer any sort of heads-up display ala BMW, but you can gadgets like radar cruise control, Mark Levinson branded audio system, blind spot monitoring and lane departure warning. No pricing on how much the IS or any of its gadgets will cost, but you can bet that Mark Levinson system won’t be cheap. The F-Sport package adds one more standard gizmo that makes it an absolute must-have package: the best LCD disco dash I’ve ever seen. Based on an 8-inch LCD the display uses a physical ring (you can see it in the picture above) to frame the tachometer so it looks more like a real gauge. The F-Sport also has a party trick up its sleeve, the moves. Sliding left in perfect synchronization with the display software it  “reveals” the trip computer, configuration menu, infotainment displays and vehicle info on the right. Based on a similar display in Lexus’ supercar (the LF-A), this has to be the coolest cluster available this side of the Tesla model S. Lexus, I almost forgive you for the joystick.

Drivetrain

IS models still use the same smooth V6s as last year with the IS 250 getting (logically) a 2.5L 204HP direct-injection V6 and the IS 350 gets a 3.5L 306HP direct-injection V6. As you would expect from naturally aspirated engines, full power is delivered at 6,400RPM for both engines and torque comes to the boil at 4,800. Compared to the 3.0L turbos in the Audi, BMW and Volvo, the IS 350’s 277lb-ft is a distinct disadvantage. Meanwhile the IS 250’s 185lb-ft pale in comparison to the 255-266lb-ft from the small turbos in the same Euro trio. If that sounds like Lexus is at a disadvantage you may be right, however BMW is chasing Lexus down the power market with the 180HP 320i.

The IS 250 RWD uses the same A960E 6-speed automatic as last year while IS 250 AWD and IS 350 AWD models still use the same beefier A760H 6-speed. The big change is in the RWD IS 350 which gets the 8-speed cog-swapper from the fire-breathing IS-F bringing the IS350 up to gear-parity with BMW and Audi and one cog ahead of the Infiniti Q50 and Mercedes C. The extra gears grant the IS 350 RWD an extra MPG on the highway (28) but the city and combined numbers remain the same (19 and 22.) The IS 250 RWD enjoys a bump of 1 MPG, but only in the combined score bringing it to 21/30/24 (City/Highway/Combined.)

The reason for the slight change is that the 8-speed transmission and final drive ratios have performance in mind with a very low 16.59:1 effective first gear ratio compared to the 14.36:1 in the 2012 IS 350. 8th gear manages to be only a hair taller than 6th in the old unit at 2.47:1 vs 2.38:1. Gears 3-6 are all close ratio gears which help the naturally aspirated V6 stay in its [comparatively] narrow power band. Helping the IS 350 feel a bit more responsive the transmission fully locks the torque converter in gears 2-8 and the whole system is programmed to blip the throttle on manual downshifts.

For reasons known only to themselves, Lexus has decided not to offer the hybrid IS 300h for sale in America. The cagey answer we were given is that Lexus is “continually reviewing their product planning.” Pity, it is the IS I would buy tomorrow if I could.

Track Drive

Most of my time with the IS was spent on an intriguing track with tight corners, little banking and two straights where we hit 110+ in the IS 350 F-Sport RWD, a BMW 335i M-Sport a C350 with the AMG sport package and of course, last year’s IS 350 as well. The lack of an Infiniti G37 was understandable since the new Q50 is replacing it soon. The lack of an ATS 3.6 was interesting considering Caddy’s recent sales success (the ATS ranks fourth in sales YTD, behind the C, 3 and G.)  Out on the track the IS 350 F-Sport RWD proved to be a very responsive sedan with excellent grip and  suspension tuning that is near perfection. The variable gear ratio steering is well weighted but just about as numb as anything you’ve driven. Of course numb steering is nothing new to this segment as both the BMW and Mercedes were devoid of feedback as well. ]

The responsiveness of the IS in tight corners really demonstrated Lexus’ dedication to making every system in the IS work well together. The dynamic suspension, variable gear steering and the intelligent downshifting logic in the transmission made the IS feel incredibly nimble. The Mercedes felt just as I had expected on the track: heavy and soft. Despite this the Merc has a decent amount of grip and is well matched to the IS 350 in terms of power. Hop in the BMW 335 however and the IS 350’s major deficiency is obvious: thrust. Despite the BMW feeling less buttoned down than the IS 350, my laps were faster and the experience was more entertaining because you had to have more skill to handle the heaps of torque put out by the 3.0L turbo. While my overall lap time was faster in the 335, I noticed I wasn’t as fast overall in the sweeping straights in the BMW, and that’s because the IS feels more connected to the road, more stable and a bit more predictable. While there wasn’t an Audi S4 in the pack, I can tell you what it would be been like. The S4 and the Volvo S60 T6 put some incredible power to the ground and I love AWD, but (and this is a big but on the track), they are both fairly nose heavy and that’s really obvious on a track like this. The ATS 3.6 however I suspect would have won “journalists” choice at the event owing to Cadillac’s efforts to replicate the driving dynamics of the old 3-Series, you know, before the 335 became “American-sized.”

While the IS 350 F-Sport felt like one with the track for the most part, high speed braking is a problem area for the IS. Because of a hairpin turn at the end of the straight you have to drop from 110+ to 35 as quickly and smoothly as possible while maintaining control. The Mercedes and the 335 accomplish this maneuver without a problem but the IS 350 felt light under hard braking and on some road surfaces a little squirrely as well. In fact the IS 350 may be slightly lighter in the rear than the Germans but it’s not a huge difference with the IS coming in around 52/48 and the IS 350 51.5/48.5.

Does any of that matter out on the road? Nope. The IS 350 is a perfectly competent luxury sedan in either setting. While the IS 350 gives away something to BMW under high-speed braking, the IS 350 never felt out of control. The feel behind the wheel is excellent, albeit slower than the 335. Without pricing available from Lexus it’s hard to form a final opinion on the 2014 Lexus IS, but since it is unlikely to have changed much it should pose a good value slotting in under the 335 in price. If you can give up thrust for a more connected feel, reliability for a smaller infotainment screen and high-speed-braking feel for something more nimble in the corners, the IS 350 is your car. Until Lexus’ brand image shifts (or they jam some turbos on their smooth V6), the 3-series will continue being hated and secretly loved by the competition.

 

Hit it

  • Excellent road manners.
  • The F-Sport nose job makes it the most aggressive looking vehicle in the segment.
  • Coolest LCD instrument cluster. Ever.

Quit it

  • Down on power.
  • The infotainment screen is small and the joystick is a pain.
  • Fewer electronic gizmos available than the competition.

Lexus flew me to the IS release event in Austin where they stuffed me full of food and beer.

2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Rear, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Side, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Rear, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Front, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Front grille, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Front, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Logo, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Rear, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Wheels, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exteruiotr, F-Sport Front, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, F-Sport LCD Gauges, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, F-Sport LCD Gauges, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, F-Sport , Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, F-Sport Dashboard, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, F-Sport Back Seat, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, F-Sport Center Console, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, F-Sport Dashboard, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, F-Sport Steering Wheel, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Standard Gauges, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Infotainment and HVAC controlls, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Center Console, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Drive Mode Selector, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250, Interior, USB Port, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250, Interior, Glovebox, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250, Engine, 2.5L V6, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250, Engine, 2.5L V6, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Trunk, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Raer Seats Folded, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Rear Seats Folded, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Raer Seats, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Dashboard, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Dashboard, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Dashboard, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Infotainment, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Lexus Enform Infotainment Screen, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, HVAC Controlls, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Steering Wheel, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Rear Door, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Rear Seats, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, front seat, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, seat controlls, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, seat controlls, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Dashboard, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Interior, Front Door, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes 2014 Lexus IS 250 2014 Lexus IS 350, Exterior, Wheels, Picture Courtesy of Alex L. Dykes Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail

 

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Review: 2011 Lexus IS 350 AWD http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/02/review-2011-lexus-is350-awd/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/02/review-2011-lexus-is350-awd/#comments Mon, 14 Feb 2011 21:03:33 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=383873 Time was Toyota thoroughly redesigned its cars every four years. Then every five. And lately not even that often. Consequently, for its sixth model year the second-generation Lexus IS received just a few tweaks. The most notable: at long last all-wheel-drive is available with an engine torquey enough to take advantage of its additional traction, […]

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Time was Toyota thoroughly redesigned its cars every four years. Then every five. And lately not even that often. Consequently, for its sixth model year the second-generation Lexus IS received just a few tweaks. The most notable: at long last all-wheel-drive is available with an engine torquey enough to take advantage of its additional traction, namely the IS 350’s 306-horsepower, 277-foot-pounds direct-injected 3.5-liter V6.

Six years ago the chunky-yet-athletic shape of the Lexus IS was fresh and at least mildly interesting. The bodysides could be slimmer, but the cab-rearward proportions clearly communicate that this is a bona-fide rear-wheel-drive sedan. Look closely and you might notice the changes to the front fascia. The new-for-2011 17-inch-alloy wheels could appear sportier, but by the same measure they could also be stodgier. Larger, more-aggressively-styled wheels that better fill the fenders are available from the factory only with rear-wheel-drive, though one set of eighteens is available as a $1,756 dealer-installed accessory.

Gray-stained wood—essentially wood for those who don’t really care for the look of wood—is the most notable change to the interior. It’s classier than the “aluminized composite” trim employed in the ultra-high-performance IS-F. Otherwise the interior is much the same, so it’s cleanly styled and quietly attractive. In general the ergonomics are very good, with large buttons flanking the touchscreen display. But as in other Toyota and Lexus cars the low placement of the digital clock makes it hard to find at a glance. Also, the buttons for the stability control and the transmission mode are obscured by the steering wheel. These would be much handier on the center console. Materials, and especially the optional soft and aromatic semi-aniline leather trim, generally befit the car’s $47,130 price.

Even after six years the driving position in the Lexus IS remains unexpectedly gangsta, with a tall instrument panel, small windows, and a relatively distant, relatively upright windshield. Certainly not a Camaro, but in that direction. This contributes to the sporty character of the car, but detracts from livability for shorter adults in the front seat and kids in the back seat. An additional compromise with all-wheel-drive: the floorboard bulges up beneath the driver’s right calf.

The front sport buckets remain very good, coddling on the highway and gripping tightly in curves. But this time around they required some fiddling before I felt comfortable—the two-way-adjustable lumbar bulge hit too high. Your back—and thus your experience—will vary. The back seat remains the tightest in the segment—even adults of middling size barely fit. This is probably the main reason people reject the IS.

Ironically, given the manufacturer’s reputation, some of my most enlightening driving experiences have occurred in Toyota or Lexus cars. I first experienced a high-winding DOHC engine in the 1984 Toyota Corolla GT-S. Afterwards, anything with just two valves per cylinder seemed antiquated. My first drive in the IS 350 back in 2005 wasn’t as revelatory, but it nevertheless indicated that direct-injection was the way forward. Hit the gas and the engine’s response was immediate and strong.

Six years is essentially an eon in the car industry, and competitors have more-or-less caught up with their own 300-plus-horsepower sixes. Yet the 3.5 in the IS, though apparently unchanged, remains best-in-class. The Infiniti G37’s 328-horsepower 3.7-liter V6 might be more powerful, but the Lexus mill is far more refined. Every noise the latter engine makes is one you want to hear—Lexus clearly spent a lot of time finessing it. To the detriment of fuel economy, my ears thoroughly enjoyed frequent trips to the redline. Need a hint of when to shift, if you opt to do this yourself? A ring of LEDs in the tach glows orange as the needle sweeps past 5,000 then turns red when it reaches 6,500. At 6,700 you’ll hit the rev limiter, and in manual mode the transmission won’t shift on its own. The 5.0-liter V8 in the IS-F kicks out another 110 horsepower, but in my week with the IS 350 I never felt the need for them. The 3.5 quickly accelerates the sedan to imprudent speeds and arguably sounds better, with less heard from the exhaust and more from the bits whirring away under the hood. Lexus claims a much quicker 0-60 time for the 350 than for the 250, 5.7 vs. 8.3 seconds.

Fuel economy isn’t much better than with the IS-F, probably because most of what the V6’s lesser cylinder count giveth the AWD’s shorter final drive, mechanical drag, and 176 additional pounds (for a total of 3,703) taketh away. My driving generally confirmed the EPA ratings of 18 city and 25 highway (vs. 20/27 with RWD). Especially aggressive driving sent the average (as reported by the trip computer) into the mid-teens. Go very easy on the gas and you’ll observe low-twenties in the suburbs.

A manual transmission continues to only be offered with the 2.5. Though not quite as smooth or as quick to respond to the paddles as the eight-speed in the IS-F, the IS 350’s six-speed remains among the best conventional automatics. It operates smoothly and usually selects the appropriate cog for the situation all on its own. I mostly employed the paddles to force the engine to sing louder or to provoke untoward reactions from the chassis.

Even on snow-covered roads I generally failed at the latter. In rear-wheel-drive form, the IS handles more safely and predictably than the Infiniti G37. Add all-wheel-drive and even when provoked the chassis rarely does something it oughtn’t. Yet handling is more lively than with many all-wheel-drive cars. Power through a curve—possible without wheelspin thanks to the AWD—and the chassis’s initial understeer transitions to mild oversteer. The relatively soft rear suspension Toyota / Lexus tends to specify in rear-wheel-drive models contributes—the rear rolls more than the front, progressively overloading the outside rear tire. Also a factor: said rear tire is, unlike in the rear-wheel-drive IS 350, the same size as the one in front (225/45VR17).

Like the IS-F, if not to the same degree, the IS 350 feelts like a big car that has been magically compacted. The interior dimensions and driving position clearly suggest you’re in a small car, but even without a big V8 in the nose the feel through the moderately heavy steering and cushy seat are of a serious, solid mass. This is good in some ways, not so good in others. A BMW 3-Series feels more agile and precise, and its steering, though lighter, provides more feedback. Lexus has refined the IS 350’s stability control system over the years. There’s still no way to entirely disable this system, but it doesn’t intrude as early or as obtrusively as it did six years ago.

An optional sport suspension is only offered with rear-wheel-drive. Though never harsh, and more absorptive and polished than the suspensions in key competitors, the IS 350’s standard suspension sometimes gets jiggly on roads that appear smooth to the eye. Drive the car very aggressively and there’s some roll and float. Overall, though, the suspension represents a very good compromise for those who’ll want to drive the car aggressively some of the time but who’ll want to relax during their daily commute. Noise levels are, in the Lexus tradition, low.

The $47,130 MSRP might seem high for a compact sedan. A comparably-equipped Infiniti G37x, with more power and more rear seat room, lists for $4,655 less. Even after adjusting for the IS 350’s slightly higher feature content (such as cooled front seats) and the significantly wider margins enjoyed by Lexus dealers the Infiniti retains a roughly $2,200 advantage, based on TrueDelta’s car price comparison tool. On the other hand, a comparably-equipped BMW 335i xDrive (did I get the insanely complicated nomenclature correct?) lists for $3,845 more, and adjusting for features and dealer margin widens this gap to about $6,000. So the Lexus is pricey compared to Japanese competitors, but a value compared to the Germans.

Now that the IS 350 is offered with all-wheel-drive, those unwilling to deal with the limitations of rear-wheel-drive in the snow no longer have to choose between settling for the torque-deficient 2.5 or buying something else. But should they choose the IS 350? The all-wheel-drive system benefits stability and traction without robbing the car of its essentially rear-wheel-drive character. Largely thanks to the excellent powertrain, but with some credit due the driving position and chassis, the IS 350 is a very enjoyable car to drive. On the other hand, when you’re not looking for excitement, it’s smooth (on most roads), refined, and comfortable—unless you’re jammed into the tight rear seat. Also, given six years to work out bugs and the model’s record to date, the small Lexus should be very reliable. In the end, the IS 350 is very much a compromise, neither as sporty as some alternatives nor as smooth-riding as others, but it’s a unique compromise that remains competitive despite the aging design.

Lexus provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review.

Michael Karesh operates TrueDelta, an online source of automotive reliability and pricing data

IS 350 wood IS 350 rear Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail IS 350 front seats IS 350 engine IS 350 IP IS 350 instruments IS 350 front quarter IS 350 front IS 350 rear seat IS 350 rear quarter

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