The Truth About Cars » GLC http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Wed, 16 Jul 2014 04:01:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.1 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars » GLC http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com Junkyard Find: 1984 Mazda GLC http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/12/junkyard-find-1984-mazda-glc/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/12/junkyard-find-1984-mazda-glc/#comments Sat, 08 Dec 2012 14:00:32 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=469242 Before it was called the 323 and then the Protegé, the North American version of the Mazda Familia was known as the GLC, aka “Great Little Car.” The really early GLCs (for example, the 7000-mile 1976 model living beneath Mazda USA’s California HQ) shared a lot of chassis components with the first-gen RX-7s, but this ’84 that I spotted in a Denver self-service yard is a more modern front-wheel-drive econobox.
I’ve driven a couple of these, and they really were good— maybe not great, but close— little cars. The list price on the base 2-door hatch was $4,995, which was $250 cheaper than the cheapest ’84 Civic. The Civic was slightly more fun to drive and (arguably) better-built, but the GLC was quite a bang-for-buck deal.
This one made it to nearly 140,000 miles during its 28 years on the planet. It probably has more miles left in it, but battered 1980s econoboxes aren’t worth fixing up for daily-driving use these days.
I haven’t seen many of these cars in wrecking yards lately; most of them got scrapped a decade or so back. There was this rear-drive ’80, and this super-rare ’81 sedan, and this even rarer ’83 sedan, and that’s been about all my junkyard GLC sightings for the last couple of years. All right, let’s watch some old TV commercials!

Includes radial tires!

As always, the JDM ad for the same car has better/cheesier 1980s music.

13 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 02 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 03 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 04 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 05 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 06 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 07 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 08 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 09 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 10 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 11 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin 12 - 1984 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Murilee Martin Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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Junkyard Find: 1983 Mazda GLC Sedan http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/02/junkyard-find-1983-mazda-glc-sedan/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/02/junkyard-find-1983-mazda-glc-sedan/#comments Mon, 27 Feb 2012 14:00:08 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=432119 After visiting the lowest-mile early Mazda GLC imaginable, I’ve been looking out for more GLCs in the junkyard. Until the 1981 model year, all the GLCs (known as the Familia or 323 outside of North America) were rear-wheel-drive and had nearly identical chassis to the early RX-7s. Mazda finally got on the front-wheel-drive bandwagon with this version, which I found in a Northern California self-serve yard earlier in the month.
These things actually were great little cars, simple, tough, and cheap. I recall most of these being hatchbacks back in the 80s, but I’ve found exactly two front-wheel-drive GLCs in junkyards recently and both were sedans.
The base two-door hatch listed at $5,295, while the base sedan went for $6,245. That explains the popularity of the hatchbacks, though the ’83 Civic sedan listed at a princely $6,849. $5,616 was the price for an ’83 Chevette four-door hatchback, if you were more concerned about number of doors than things like build quality, comfort, interior space, or performance.
Check out this in-dash Clarion AM/FM radio. Can you believe thieves used to steal these things?

10 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 01 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 02 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 03 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 04 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 05 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 06 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 07 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 08 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden 09 - 1983 Mazda GLC Down On The Junkyard - Pictures courtesy of Phillip 'Great Little Catastrophe' Greden glc Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail ]]>
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Hidden Beneath Mazda USA Headquarters: Candyland! http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/12/hidden-beneath-mazda-usa-headquarters-candyland/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/12/hidden-beneath-mazda-usa-headquarters-candyland/#comments Wed, 14 Dec 2011 23:01:59 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=422381 A couple months back, I visited Southern California as part of a triangular journey from Denver to the Skankaway Anti-Toe-Fungal 500 24 Hours of LeMons. Mazda’s PR flacks handed me the keys to an RX-8 at LAX (review coming soon, really) and I pointed the car’s nose south, heading beyond the Orange Curtain. Since the Impala Hell Project began while I was an art student at the University of California, Irvine and I was devoted to lowering Irvine’s property values while I was there, I figured I’d pay a visit to Mazda USA HQ in Irvine and see about lowering their property values.
Dave Coleman may be best-known for his work as the former Engineering Editor for Sport Compact Car Magazine, or as captain of the winningest team in 24 Hours of LeMons history, but he’s also got this interesting day job as a Mazda engineer. That means that, while in Irvine, I had no choice but to show up at his workplace (in a Mazda press car) and try to get him in trouble with The Man.
“Screw the latest press releases!” I barked at Coleman, who was jabbering something or other about this newfangled Skyactiv thing. “Show me the weird stuff in the basement!” Yes, below the dime-a-dozen-in-Irvine mirrored-glass office building of Mazda USA HQ is a magical subterranean place, where Mazda engineers can stash away all manner of weird and interesting stuff without worrying about the suits showing up and cleaning house.
It turns out that there’s some manner in which Mazda USA engineers can get their counterparts in Hiroshima to put, say, an RX87 Luce Rotary coupe on a container ship full of ordinary Mazdas and have that stuff show up in Irvine. The first thing I saw when entering the basement was a set of spare body panels for one of the ’91 Le Mans 787Bs. No, they don’t have the winner— they keep that car in Japan— but the 8th-place car is in Irvine. Put some manufacturer’s plates on it and take it for a spin on the 405, I say!
Do you like early Miatas? Here are the 14th and 15th Miatas to be built for the North American market.
A VIN that ends in 000014 is pretty cool, I think.
Here’s the blinged-out-and-flared Miata that Mazda took to all the car shows in 1989.
This oddball Miata is a full-sized, all-metal handmade prototype for the designers working on the second-generation version.
Here’s the RX-2 that Car & Driver ran in IMSA in 1973.
Then we get to the stuff that really gets me going. This 1967 Luce Rotary Coupe… there are no words.
Right-hand-drive, factory 8-track, skinny wooden steering wheel, the works.
Unfortunately, we couldn’t get the hood latch to work, so I didn’t get any shots of one of the only 13A engines in the world.
It wouldn’t be Mazda Candyland without a Suzuki RE5!
There’s a Late Malaise Era Cosmo in cherry red, just for a change of pace.
Then there’s this fine machine, which is the car that Coleman lured me to Irvine with in the first place: the most original, lowest-mile early Mazda GLC in the world!
It’s a 1976 model, with every hokey tape-stripe option Mazda had available.
7,505 miles on the clock!
Yellow plaid interior. Imagine being a car shopper in 1976 and saying to yourself, “Yes, I must have the yellow plaid interior in my new car!”
According to Coleman, this car is essentially a piston-engined RX-7 under the skin. How much power did that 1272cc mill make? 49 horses.
If I worked at Mazda USA, I’d be on the phone with Hiroshima night and day, demanding that they ship more ’71 Bongos and ’76 Roadpacers.

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Junkyard Find: 1981 Mazda GLC Sedan http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/06/junkyard-find-1981-mazda-glc-sedan/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/06/junkyard-find-1981-mazda-glc-sedan/#comments Thu, 30 Jun 2011 13:00:09 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=401069
The Mazda GLC, aka Familia aka 323 was once a fairly common sight on American roads, but just about all of the GLCs were hatchbacks. Here’s a rare sedan that was able to hang on for 30 years before being discarded.

Mazda tried to play up the “driving excitement” angle of the GLC with this ad, in an attempt to differentiate the car from all the other sub-ton econoboxes of the era. With 68 horsepower under the hood, however, GLC drivers were wise to avoid hills.

1981 was the first year for front-wheel-drive in the GLC.

Imagine car shopping in 1981 in Great Falls, Montana: Mazdas, Dodges, and Fiats in the same dealership! Would you take a Strada, a GLC, or an Omni?

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Great Little Car Now Great Little Source of Scrap Steel http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/01/great-little-car-now-great-little-source-of-scrap-steel/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/01/great-little-car-now-great-little-source-of-scrap-steel/#comments Tue, 18 Jan 2011 14:00:00 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=380887
Not many folks remember Mazda’s Chevette competitor, the rear-drive Mazda GLC. OK, it was more of a Toyota Starlet competitor, but there’s a certain Chevette-ness about its lines. I spotted this super-rare machine at a Denver self-service wrecking yard yesterday.

A Great Little Car! We have to wonder what marketing genius came up with that name for the Mazda Familia.

More shots for my collection of Little Trees In Junked Cars photographs!

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