By on June 25, 2013

IMG_1060
Central to the tone of Jack Baruth’s lovely father-and-son 911 vignette is the concept of the Forever Car. It’s a nice thought – the machine acting as fossilizing amber, perfectly capturing a fleeting memory such that it lasts an eternity.

This idea is, to me, an entirely rational way to explain the presence of a theoretical soul in something that is composed of nothing more than steel, glass, rubber and leather. Cars don’t have souls, they develop them through experience – the transference of an emotion felt behind the wheel. It doesn’t have to be a 911 either, even the humblest old Volvo shoebox absorbs a personality as it slots into the background in slide after slide of family vacation pictures.

And then, you find yourself browsing craigslist and seeing a well-preserved you-name-it and thinking, “I could make that mine. I could share that with my children, and they would understand, and when I am dead and gone, they would explain it to their kids, and they would know.”

It’s a nice thought, the Forever Car. It perfectly encapsulates the human need for lasting possessions, of the art scrawled on the cave wall that says, “I was here.” One’s all-too-brief lifetime becomes a link in a chain that’ll stretch out over the years; less an ownership cycle than the work of a custodian/curator.

Well hurry up then. The last Forever Cars have already been built. (Read More…)

By on December 11, 2009

Classic? No. Future classic? Now we're talking...

The Friends of the National Automotive History Collection have voted the Ford Flex as their “Collectible Car of the Future” of 2009. According to the NAHC’s press release, the award process “asked members to predict which of this year’s new vehicles will turn heads in the Woodward Cruise of 2034.” Of course, this criteria allowed only Detroit iron into the running, a stricture that we won’t hold you to here. We don’t care where in the world your nominated vehicle is built or sold, we just want to know what new car sold anywhere will be a coveted classic in 20 years. Our first nomination comes from TTAC commenter gslippy, who figures

Early Nanos will become collector’s items someday, just as the Honda N600 has.

That’s a solid nomination to start things off with, to which I would simply add the BYD F3DM. Not only is it the world’s first mass-produced plug-in hybrid, it has also sold miserably, further adding to its future collector value.

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India