The Truth About Cars » efi http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Wed, 02 Sep 2015 22:11:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars » efi http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com Piston Slap: At What Rate, the Falcon’s Restomod Wings? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/08/piston-slap-rate-falcons-restomod-wings/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/08/piston-slap-rate-falcons-restomod-wings/#comments Thu, 27 Aug 2015 12:00:22 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=1151185   Stephen writes: Sajeev, I drive a ’65 Falcon convertible with the 289 and a T-5, hydraulic clutch, and 4-wheel discs just like it came from the factory. (Wink – SM) I replaced all of the rubber in the front suspension about 15 years ago and it’s past time to do it again. I’m up […]

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Wendy 473

Envious. (photo courtesy: OP)

Stephen writes:

Sajeev,

I drive a ’65 Falcon convertible with the 289 and a T-5, hydraulic clutch, and 4-wheel discs just like it came from the factory. (Wink – SM)

I replaced all of the rubber in the front suspension about 15 years ago and it’s past time to do it again. I’m up in the air between sticking with factory stuff or upgrading to some of the aftermarket Mustang stuff (i.e tubular A and control arms). While the aftermarket stuff is significantly improved over stock, I actually drive the car; earlier this summer I did a road trip from Denver to Bozeman, MT via Yellowstone, a total of about 1800 miles. I can go to any auto parts store and get replacement parts, while I could wait for TCI, etc to FedEx me something.

Second question. I still have the 4bbl carb on it for the same reason. Do any of the aftermarket fuel injection system use mainly OEM parts (i.e injectors, fuel pump)? I did get between 23-28 mpg on the Bozeman trip.

Sajeev answers:

First we discuss:

  1. How that Falcon is disturbingly awesome.
  2. How restomods are usually done wrong, except here.
  3. How beautiful your part of the country is.

Ahem! So, about the suspension upgrades: look at the bushings. Bushing size (diameter, thickness) and composition (rubber, polyurethane) have an impact on ride quality and NVH control.

My experience with aftermarket suspensions on old Fords is personal: take this restomod Mercury Cyclone seen in Hemmings. The stance is sinister and it’s a blast to drive in the twisties, but the aftermarket (Mustang II style) control arms with teeny-tiny, non-rubber bushings are tough on Houston roads. It’s a bad-ass persona ideal for most restomodders, and I respect that. But, if I was in charge of this project, I’d ditch the kit’s control arms for factory Mustang II control arms with big, juicy, plump and delicious rubber bushings. A regression-mod restoration, perhaps? 

Granted your roads are a far cry from mine, but I wouldn’t add an NVH-averse suspension on a droptop Falcon without chassis stiffeners like subframe connectors. I’d add those connectors no matter what! Since you can (?) grab parts designed for the 1964 Mustang, I’d recommend the stock (rebuilt) suspension with the best shocks and springs you can find.

And what about EFI conversions? Many reputable setups use GM sensors attached to custom wiring harnesses, so don’t sweat that. In the spirit of your T-5 swap, add EEC-IV from a 5-liter Mustang, provided hood clearance is no different than ’60s Mustangs. Aside from the occasionally wonky TFI module, it’s a great swap: Fox Mustangs are losing their EFI systems for LSX-FTW swaps on a regular basis! You can pick up an entire EEC-IV setup (intake, fuel rails, wiring, sensors) for a couple hundred bucks!

Fuel pumps get dicey depending on the easiest fuel tank conversion. I’d put faith in expensive Aeromotive parts, but maybe these guys got the Falcon covered better. Often these assemblies use the same tube-shaped pump available at any parts store.

Your current mileage is impressive and proves that a well-tuned spread bore (?) carb runs nearly as efficient as EFI…provided it stays in tune. Swapping to EFI nets greater consistency in all driving conditions…if that’s what you really want.

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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Piston Slap: Oil Burning and Carbon Cleaning? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/06/piston-slap-oil-burning-carbon-cleaning/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/06/piston-slap-oil-burning-carbon-cleaning/#comments Tue, 09 Jun 2015 11:00:53 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=1085625   Arley writes: Sajeev, I have a 2003 Jetta TDI with 178k miles. Runs 100%. My mechanic recommends a carbon cleaning. What are the positives and negatives? To be more succinct, what can go wrong? You can tune a piano but you can’t tuna fish. (Good to know! – SM) Sajeev answers: Conventional wisdom (for […]

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Looks legit. (photo courtesy: n0str9 @ forums.tdiclub.com)

Arley writes:

Sajeev,

I have a 2003 Jetta TDI with 178k miles. Runs 100%. My mechanic recommends a carbon cleaning. What are the positives and negatives? To be more succinct, what can go wrong?

You can tune a piano but you can’t tuna fish. (Good to know! – SM)

Sajeev answers:

Conventional wisdom (for both diesel and gas engines) is carbon buildup occurs more often when the owner subjects the engine to excessive idling and a severe lack of full throttle acceleration. Today’s direct injected, EGR equipped diesels (and direct injected gas engines lacking a piggyback port-EFI setup a la Toyota V6s) are sensitive to carbon buildup due to idle time, EGR design and cooling system inadequacies, and perhaps even fuel (i.e. varying quality of bio diesel). Don’t take my word, this company’s blog did a good job assessing the problem.

Whew!

So carbon cleaning is commonplace and a good idea. And be it a seafoam-alike treatment or physical removal/cleaning of critical parts, there’s no downside if performed with even a modicum of care.

Question is, do YOU have a problem? 

Considering your mileage (less idling and more highway driving?) and engine performance: probably not. Watch this video (go to 1:39) and DIY if you are even the least bit handy. From the video, make a trip to the parts store for vacuum lines too!

Or just do nothing aside from performing an Italian Tune-Up. That’d work for sure, and it’s totally fun.

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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Piston Slap: MAP-ping Engine Load http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/08/piston-slap-4/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/08/piston-slap-4/#comments Mon, 18 Aug 2014 12:55:25 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=893722 TTAC regular David Holzman writes: When my scan gauge says my engine is under 99% load, and I’ve only pushed the gas pedal about halfway down, does that mean, as I suspect, that I can floor it and I’m not going to get more than a drop more power out of it?  And, in a […]

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(photo courtesy: www.8thcivic.com)

TTAC regular David Holzman writes:

When my scan gauge says my engine is under 99% load, and I’ve only pushed the gas pedal about halfway down, does that mean, as I suspect, that I can floor it and I’m not going to get more than a drop more power out of it? 

And, in a modern car (’08 Civic, stick), will the computer control prevent me from wasting gas by pushing the gas pedal beyond the point where I’ve reached 99% load?

Sajeev answers:

I’ve wondered this myself, just not enough to research until someone posed the question to TTAC.

Since the dawn of carburetors, vehicles used engine vacuum to measure engine load under the guise of a fuel economy gauge. Earlier EFI machines implemented fuel injector duty cycle to spit out a fuel economy reading. It’s cheaper/easier/simpler to use the fuel injection computer’s powers to calculate an approximate number, but many (all?) newer models use the mass-airflow sensor (MAF) and/or the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor as the basis of these calculations.

As per SAE standard J1979, there are two engine load values: calculated and absolute load value. I suspect absolute load value is used in more customer facing interfaces, as it’s a normalized figure that might be easier to apply across multiple engines, platforms and operation parameters sans re-work. And it probably neuters the data as to not cause end user confusion, warranty claims, lawsuits, etc.

If reading this hamfisted analysis upsets you, methinks you’re a pretty frickin’ brilliant engineer.  Distilling this into an easy to digest blog post isn’t easy, as I was more of a Collegiate SAE wonk. But let’s get it down to one sentence:

Load values are a normalized calculation of engine airflow, which isn’t a 100% accurate measure of the load on your vehicle’s engine at any time.

How’s that for not answering your question and giving me a headache?  I console myself with this Hot Panther Looove:

Click here to view the embedded video.

Oooooh yeah, muuuuuuch better.

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice. 

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Piston Slap: Playing Super Breakout by Itself? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/01/piston-slap-playing-super-breakout-by-itself/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/01/piston-slap-playing-super-breakout-by-itself/#comments Mon, 23 Jan 2012 14:00:21 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=427725   C.V. writes: I am a mechanical engineering student looking to learn how to work on cars. My friend has given me the opportunity to take his 1988 Mazda B2200 extra-cab 5-speed. When I drove it, I saw why. The catalytic converter has broken off, and apparently pieces of it are in the exhaust. Would […]

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C.V. writes:

I am a mechanical engineering student looking to learn how to work on cars.

My friend has given me the opportunity to take his 1988 Mazda B2200 extra-cab 5-speed. When I drove it, I saw why. The catalytic converter has broken off, and apparently pieces of it are in the exhaust. Would it be possible to just replace the catalytic converter, or should I replace the whole exhaust?

Also while driving it, there is a weird problem. About 10 or so minutes after startup and driving, it starts bucking back and forth as if I was engaging and disengaging the clutch. Any idea as to why that is happening? Theoretically the truck could drive even with this problem, but I don’t think it’s safe or good for the truck. What should I do?

Sajeev answers:

It wasn’t long ago that I was an mechanical engineering student looking to work on cars.  Hell, it’s way more fun than a semester of Thermodynamics, Solid and Fluid Mechanics! So what’s my advice?  Join the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) as a student and join the local chapter in your college.  The SAE chapter at the University of Texas changed my life, in a good way. And if you don’t have a chapter?  MAKE ONE!

Oh wait…you wanted advice on the truck, not your career. My bad.

The first problem is pretty easy, replace the convertor. Or not: eventually the loose bits of honeycomb inside will stop playing Super Breakout with itself, exit stage left, and it still might pass an emissions test.  If not, any exhaust shop can slap in a new one, and I just Googled one for $270 that’s a direct replacement.  I am sure you college kids use Google all the time, why not for a sweet little truck?

The second one is usually a combination of a poor gear change technique and a lack of fuel.  Or maybe too much fuel.  Does it buck less if you give it more gas and take more time to let out the clutch?  Problem solved. If not, I’d recommend rebuilding the carb, seafoaming the motor (at your own risk, see YouTube for reasons why), and testing the fuel pressure.  Actually not in that order: start with fuel pressure, then maybe learn how to work on a carb.

Or convert it to a later-model EFI setup! Or even better, LS1-FTW!!! You are an engineer for a reason!

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com . Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry.

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