The Truth About Cars » damage http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Sat, 21 Mar 2015 00:42:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0.1 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars » damage http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com Piston Slap: Outdoor Convertible Storage? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/03/piston-slap-outdoor-convertible-storage/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/03/piston-slap-outdoor-convertible-storage/#comments Mon, 09 Mar 2015 12:53:48 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=1017562   Ken writes: Sajeev – I thoroughly enjoy your column – keep up the good work! You’ve also answered several questions I’ve sent over the years, so thanks for that. Your latest article on rear quarter panel rust on Hondas got me thinking. I have an attached 2 car garage and 3 cars. You can […]

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Or not… (photo courtesy: http://www.rigsofrods.com/)

Ken writes:

Sajeev –
I thoroughly enjoy your column – keep up the good work! You’ve also answered several questions I’ve sent over the years, so thanks for that.

Your latest article on rear quarter panel rust on Hondas got me thinking. I have an attached 2 car garage and 3 cars. You can see the dilemma. Two cars are DDs and one is a recently purchased pleasure vehicle/ toy – in a used 2007 Saab 9-3.

Since I’m married, my wife’s MKZ (the same one you provided mod advice on) owns one of the spaces – leaving me one for an SUV (2010 Xterra) and said convertible.

I live in New England and the convertible will not see usage from November through till April. This is my first winter with the two car dilemma. At first my decision was made for me. The Saab 9-3 would sit outside. We have a newborn and I didn’t want to trudge the little guy into the cold when we have an attached garage. And since a pop up carport went over with the Wife like a fart in church – I bought a high end car cover for the Saab.

Fast forward, things have changed and we no longer utilize daycare for the little guy. The Saab is now sitting in the garage. WITH a car cover on it. (Cause why not? Already have it.) I figured I could wrench on it occasionally during the winter. But if I’m honest, even though the garage is attached, its just too friggin cold. So it could sit outside.

Both vehicles I’d like to keep for a long time. But my Xterra is of more use to the family and should get the better treatment of the two. The Saab shouldn’t rust much as it will never see salt, but the Nissan is my winter driver.

My question is – which should be outside and which inside? With the latest snow storms I am a bit annoyed clearing snow off my car when I don’t have to – but its just me and I’ve done it for years so its not really a big deal. I’ve also heard that its better to keep a vehicle in the cold rather than cycles of warm and cold as the attached frozen salt will melt and corrode more. Is there any truth to that?

What are your thoughts? Car cover the Saab outside or leave it in the garage?

Sajeev answers:

A total no-brainer: leave the Saab in the garage.

Never leave a winter beater in the garage when you have a topless summer toy! Okay, so says the single guy who lives in Houston.

But still, the effects of snow on a droptop are dangerous, especially when it’s a vehicle lacking the ridiculously strong aftermarket support of something Mustang convertible-like.

 

You want it, they got it .(photo courtesy: foxresto.com)

 

Like the above set up, most of which I’ve replaced (some personally) on the Mehta’s own Mo-Stang, a 1987 Mustang GT droptop.  It’s pretty easy and super cheap, and the re-popped parts are often OEM-quality: making the Mo-Stang a pure joy to own and restore like most Fox Bodies.  But that’s really not the point.

The point?  What works for me is not so cheap and easy for you. So forget outdoor convertible storage, it ain’t worth the risk of wear and tear. Put the Saab in the garage and leave the rusty winter beater out in the winter.

 

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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Piston Slap: The Importance of A Craigslist 3-Ring Binder http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/02/piston-slap-importance-craigslist-3-ring-binder/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/02/piston-slap-importance-craigslist-3-ring-binder/#comments Mon, 02 Feb 2015 13:57:46 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=991714 TTAC commentator dtremit writes: Hey Sajeev — Inspired by your recent Mazda3 Piston Slap, I thought I’d throw this question your way. Seems like something the B&B might have advice on. I have a 2005 Mazda6 that is a rather desirable used car…on paper. It is in excellent condition mechanically, and has fairly low miles […]

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How do I know you love me? (photo courtesy: zazzle.com)

TTAC commentator dtremit writes:

Hey Sajeev —

Inspired by your recent Mazda3 Piston Slap, I thought I’d throw this question your way. Seems like something the B&B might have advice on.

I have a 2005 Mazda6 that is a rather desirable used car…on paper. It is in excellent condition mechanically, and has fairly low miles for its age (about 78k). Single owner, and I have maintained it well, though I am not sure the mess of receipts in the glovebox counts as excellent documentation. I have a good set of Nokian snow tires for it on steel wheels, which would go along with it. It would make a good car for someone for quite some time to come.

My problem is that it’s cosmetically a lot worse off; ten years in Boston is hard on a car. It has a ~3″ perforation in the front bumper, and both front and rear bumpers are quite well scratched. (Otherwise, the paint is in reasonably good shape, and there aren’t any major flaws that wouldn’t buff out.) There’s also a bit of rust starting in one rear wheel well, though it appears limited and cosmetic.

Inside, like nearly every 6 of its era, the foam on the driver’s seat bolster has failed, though the leather is intact. The leather on the wheel is pretty scraped up, and there’s a tear in the carpet in the driver’s footwell.

I had intended to keep this car for a few more years, until it was more or less worthless anyway. However, my plans may include a new car sooner as a recent injury leaves me struggling to get in and out of the Mazda. So I’m wondering — what is my best strategy for getting value out of this car?

Do I try to repair some of the cosmetic stuff, and hope it increases the sale price? If so, what does it make sense to spend on, and where should I scrimp? Or do I try to cut my losses and negotiate the best trade I can in the current condition?

I will probably be buying a Ford using A-plan, so the price of the new car won’t be up for negotiation. I’ve considered just being blunt about its shortcomings, contacting a bunch of local Ford dealers, and letting them know I’ll be buying an A-plan car from whichever one offers me the best trade. I don’t have a sense of whether they’ll play that game, though.

Anyhow, thought this might be an interesting question, since a lot of readers probably find themselves in this basic situation at some point.

Sajeev answers:

First, grab a 3-ring binder, I betcha there’s one about to get tossed at your/your loved ones/your friends office right now! Use a hole punch on the receipts, pop them in and print out an image of your car (from Google Image search) and slide it into the front’s clear sleeve.

BLAM SON, a fantastic repair/service history that makes you look like you really, truly loved this car!

Rust and body damage is par for the course in your part of the country.  I also assume your suspension is beat to hell on Boston roads. Whatever, that’s life: restoring a 10-year-old sedan won’t generate the value to justify the cost.  So find the most willing buyer for your dollar. My first stop? Carmax.

Carmax sets the floor for your asking price, your Mazda would probably be sold at their auction for a bit more than they have in it. Which implies that you’ll find a willing buyer on Craigslist for more money, maybe what it would go for at the auction. Essentially you offer a decent auction car with none of the hassle and cost. See how you’re adding value by essentially doing nothing? 

Back to the 3-ring binder: that’s your secret Craigslist weapon.  Keeping in mind the Carmax offer, put the Mazda6 on Craigslist in as-is condition (aside from a proper cleaning if you’re messy) with good quality photos and offer it at the private party asking price of Edmunds.com, KBB.com, etc appraisal tool. Write an honest assessment of the car’s positives and negatives in bullet point format, it will build trust and speed up a buyer’s first visit.

And mention that cool 3-ring binder you have for the car, too!

Your final transaction price will likely be between private party and the Carmax offer. It must be higher than the trade-in credit you get from the Ford dealer.

Credit perks aside, the Ford dealer(s) will likely beat Carmax’s offer if you ask.  Maybe because they wanna pretty it up if its good fodder for their used car lot. But one of them will deal: especially if they’re hungry to move another unit that month.  Or that quarter.  Or this year.

 

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

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Piston Slap: a Camry Car Wash Conspiracy? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/09/piston-slap-a-camry-car-wash-conspiracy/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/09/piston-slap-a-camry-car-wash-conspiracy/#comments Wed, 26 Sep 2012 11:28:44 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=461314 Scott writes: Dear Sajeev, Recently I took my 1999 Toyota Camry (2.2L 4-cylinder) to a touchless car wash with underbody sprayers. This was a car wash that I used often, so I had good luck with it until this one particular day. Prior to getting it washed the Camry ran fine all afternoon, including during […]

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Scott writes:

Dear Sajeev,

Recently I took my 1999 Toyota Camry (2.2L 4-cylinder) to a touchless car wash with underbody sprayers. This was a car wash that I used often, so I had good luck with it until this one particular day. Prior to getting it washed the Camry ran fine all afternoon, including during the wash.

However, after I left and drove about a quarter-mile down the road, the car acted funny–running rough, no power, etc. This happened sporadically, so one second it would “act up” and then it would run normally for another half of a mile and then “act up” again. As I was trying to nurse the car along to get me back home, the check engine light came on and the hiccups became more frequent until it ran poorly, period (the entire trip, from car wash to my house, was about four miles in stop-and-go traffic with speeds up to 30 MPH). Conveniently the engine stalled just as I parked it in my driveway. Long story short–I had to get it towed and the mechanic had to replace both ignition coils. Was this just a matter of coincidence, or was there a possibility the car wash somehow affected my vehicle?

Thanks in advance for the help.

Sajeev answers:

This is pretty scary: it’s a conspiracy by the automakers to damage the sterling reputation the Camry’s durability! I’ve never heard of this problem with livery drivers (in regularly washed Panthers) so I suggest you find the nearest Mercury Grand Marquis for sale and BUY IT…SON!

I’m realizing that I need a Panther Super PAC: I’d make a difference in our society!  Hey, if Colbert has one, why not the Crown Victoria?

But I digress. It’s unfortunate that water vapor does this, but it is true. One of the cars in the Mehta garage is a Mercedes buyback because of this exact problem. Or was. But that’s not the point: power washing is bad for electrics, but older motors with older rubber bits are susceptible to even a bit of vapor from regular car wash use.

Let’s make this simple: odds are your Camry needed a FULL tune up (plugs, spark plug wires, fuel filter etc.) anyway, and the magic powers of water vapor was the last straw.

Send your queries to sajeev@thetruthaboutcars.com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry.

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2013 Ford Escapes Struck By Hail At Kentucky Factory http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/05/2013-ford-escapes-struck-by-hail-at-kentucky-factory/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/05/2013-ford-escapes-struck-by-hail-at-kentucky-factory/#comments Thu, 31 May 2012 13:45:18 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=446982 The 2013 Ford Escape is about to launch soon, and Ford is stuck with 3,500 units that were damaged in a hail storm that can’t be sold as new cars. The vehicles were caught in the midst of the April 28th hail storm that struck the Louisville, Kentucky area, where the Escape is built. Ford […]

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The 2013 Ford Escape is about to launch soon, and Ford is stuck with 3,500 units that were damaged in a hail storm that can’t be sold as new cars.

The vehicles were caught in the midst of the April 28th hail storm that struck the Louisville, Kentucky area, where the Escape is built. Ford said that the damaged vehicles won’t affect the vehicle’s rollout, but they’re not quite sure what to do with the cars.

“We haven’t determined what we will do with them yet, but they will not be shipped to dealers as new,” said Ford spokesman Todd Nissen, speaking to Automotive News.

According to AN, Ford is inspecting the lot and the damaged vehicles. Without any word on the severity of the damage, it’s hard to know if any of the vehicles could ever be re-sold. The prospect of declaring a total loss on vehicles damaged by hail seems a bit extreme from this damage point, but buying a hail damaged vehicle, even with a disclosure and a discount, may not be enough for some buyers.

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