Tag: Classics

By on May 28, 2012

Vancouver’s a funny place when it comes to car culture. One one hand, we’ve got a downtown core that’s switching over to highly affluent residential living, similarly well-heeled Western regions and, carved into the hillsides of West Vancouver, a community that rates its own “Real Housewives Of…” unreality show.

Fuelled by wealth swirling off the Pacific Rim, there’re a lot of high-status automobiles on the streets: throw a rock at random and you’ll likely hit a Supercharged Range Rover, but only after a bounce off two 911s and a Ferrari California. I’ve seen more curbed dubs, beat-up Vantages and hack-job ‘tuner’ M3s than I care to remember. I even recall seeing an RS4 with doilies on the headrests.

Still, to each his own, and for the residents of East Vancouver that means a backlash against conspic-consump buggies and an affinity for hot-rodding. Quick, hand me a ballpoint before somebody notices I don’t have a neck tattoo. (Read More…)

By on July 15, 2011

Photos courtesy of Cars In Depth

Jack Baruth called the 1976 Cadillac Fleetwood Sixty Special Talisman that he delivered to Sajeev’s brother “majestic”. While Jack and Sajeev have been playing with a big Caddy, lately I’ve been seeing a lot of Dearborn’s favorite luxury brand and it’s given me a lot of opportunity to think about Lincoln’s past and future. Today, Cadillac, buoyed by the success of the CTS and its variants, along with profitable sales of the SRX (and Escalade too) seems strong compared to Lincoln. As has been the case since Henry Leland’s day Lincoln has almost always been Detroit’s weaker sister when it’s come to luxury cars. Almost always…

(Read More…)

By on November 15, 2009

(courtesy:hogansclassiccars.com)

Passenger pigeons were the most common bird found in North America. So common that flocks numbering 2 billion were up to a mile wide and 300 miles long. In other words, the average North American in the 18th and 19th Century saw a lot of these pigeons. You could easily argue that a passenger pigeon sighting in 1812 was something on the same scale today as seeing mind-numbing crap on TV. Not a particularly noteworthy or unique experience. So what took the passenger pigeon down? It was a combination of things but the biggest factor was that these pigeons tasted pretty good (a lot like chicken) and they were plentiful-hence a cheap source of food.bThey were wiped out at the pace of millions per year, so the last documented passenger pigeon named Martha died on September 1st 1914. In other words, something the average American had seen every day was extinct in a matter of a few decades. Quick extinction of a very common species is not a phenomenon exclusive to Mother Nature because cars can disappear overnight too. Here are a few that will soon be joining that “whatever happened to…” list.
(Read More…)

By on November 10, 2009

47dodge

I have always had a soft spot for the post-war late 40s Detroit automobile look which looked eerily like the pre-war early 40s Detroit look. You can’t send Cadillacs into combat zones and DeSotos made poor amphibious assault vehicles, so Detroit became lead manufacturer for the war effort in 1941. Forget cars, the free world needed Sherman tanks until 1945. People just wanted cars in 1947 and supply fell well behind demand for the North American auto manufacturers. The 1947 market conditions must seem like a long lost beautiful dream for the former Big Three in 2009. But enough with the history lesson, I had a chance to test drive a very well preserved 1947 Dodge Regent with 38,000 original miles on it and I leapt at the opportunity. The car was a time capsule; complete with rear suicide doors, front and back vent windows instead of air conditioning, and human arms instead of signal lights.

(Read More…)

By on February 9, 2009

Living in Breckenridge, Colorado, you need some sort of All-Wheel Drive setup. Snow remains the small town’s primary reason to exist. This explains the multitudes of Subarus, Audis, Volvos, and SUVs all equipped with four wheel motivation. Most drive away blissfully unaware of how recent this feature came to market (as little as 27 years ago). In 1980, Audi introduced the first permanently engaged all-wheel drive system in the Audi Quattro. Prior to this, all vehicles had a part-time system where only two wheels were driven most of the time, requiring driver intervention should the going get slippery. Audi changed all this by putting one driveshaft inside the other, saving space and weight and making it possible for a complex, permanently engaged system to function on a small car. Vorsprung durch Technik, baby!

(Read More…)

Recent Comments

  • Re: Life With Accord: 12,000 Miles

    thelaine - Noble713, that’s where my feet go (or “feets,” as my family often jokes). So the first thing you do is cover it up. So no one can see or touch...
  • Re: Life With Accord: 12,000 Miles

    jaydez - Every factory floor mat I’ve owned in the last 10 years has done that… except Hyundai. My 2006 Fusion had them replaced twice under warranty before ford...
  • Re: Life With Accord: 12,000 Miles

    thornmark - Exactly. I got the Costco rubber mats the day after I picked up my Accord. The Honda mats underneath are still factory fresh looking.
  • Re: Chart Of The Day: U.S. Minivan Market Share In 2014

    Pch101 - Dodge is being repositioned as a youthful performance brand. A minivan doesn’t really belong there.
  • Re: Ford’s Final Ute

    RobertRyan - Silliness is in the mind of the beholder, many have wondered why Ford dropped the FPV version of the Ute. a lot of the negatives regarding the Falcon Ute come down to...
  • Re: Life With Accord: 12,000 Miles

    Noble713 - thelaine, I read this article and thought exactly the same thing. I’m not a fan of carpet in general, but especially despise the crap they put in cars. In...
  • Re: Daimler Boss Calls For Safety Standard Harmonization

    Lou_BC - @Vulpine – I don’t consider myself a fan of any size or class of truck. I buy what I think most closely fits my needs at the time...
  • Re: Ford’s Final Ute

    TonyJZX - i can imagine how silly this vehicle looks for non Australians because its ridiculously silly to me who wants a rwd live axled 4,000lb ute with a Ford Fusion note glued...
  • Re: Life With Accord: 12,000 Miles

    Pete Zaitcev - Not anymore. To the best of my knowledge, you cannot get a bare tub Wrangler in the JK generation. It turns out a good thing, because the 42RLE auto is a real...
  • Re: Life With Accord: 12,000 Miles

    supremebrougham - I bought a leftover 2013 Civic back in the spring. Fine little car, but the carpet is the poorest excuse for carpet I have ever seen! As for the floormats,...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States