The Truth About Cars » Chrysler Lebaron http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. Thu, 23 Oct 2014 04:02:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars no The Truth About Cars editors@ttac.com editors@ttac.com (The Truth About Cars) 2006-2009 The Truth About Cars The Truth About Cars is dedicated to providing candid, unbiased automobile reviews and the latest in auto industry news. The Truth About Cars » Chrysler Lebaron http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/wp-content/themes/ttac-theme/images/logo.gif http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com What Happened to the Four-Seat Convertible? http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/04/what-happened-to-the-four-seat-convertible/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/04/what-happened-to-the-four-seat-convertible/#comments Tue, 16 Apr 2013 16:15:35 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=485078 When I was a kid, I knew there to be two universal automotive truths. Number one was that the Lamborghini Countach was really cool. I, like all kids, had a Lamborghini Countach poster on my bedroom wall, which I’m convinced was part of a cunning decades-long Lamborghini marketing scheme: first, hook them when they’re seven. […]

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When I was a kid, I knew there to be two universal automotive truths. Number one was that the Lamborghini Countach was really cool. I, like all kids, had a Lamborghini Countach poster on my bedroom wall, which I’m convinced was part of a cunning decades-long Lamborghini marketing scheme: first, hook them when they’re seven. Then, thirty years later, come out with a model that’s actually drivable. And now that buyers are getting older, confuse them with special editions.

The other universal truth was that if you wanted a convertible, you were going to the Chrysler dealer to buy a LeBaron.

In today’s world, this is hard to believe. That’s because the only people who go to Chrysler dealers are employees, plus the occasional tourist who visits Chrysler of Manhattan in search of a bathroom after leaving the Intrepid Museum.

But in the late 1980s and early 1990s, there were two different Chryslers. One was the Chrysler who made impressively awful crap like the Dodge Monaco, which is probably the car least suited for actually visiting its namesake. (Close runner-up: Pontiac Parisienne.) But the other Chrysler made some decent vehicles, like the original Jeep Grand Cherokee, the minivans, and – most importantly – the LeBaron.

Chrysler’s Convertible Domination

The LeBaron was perfect because it meant that people who wanted a convertible with four seats (in other words, your wife’s mother) didn’t need to buy a performance car like a Mustang or a Camaro. Instead, they could get a comfortable, reasonably attractive, well-priced Chrysler and cruise around all day visiting salons. While Chevrolet and Ford competed for discerning enthusiast buyers, Chrysler walked away with the “relaxed convertible” set whose low standards consisted primarily of: make sure the top goes up and down.

When the LeBaron died in 1995, Chrysler made a rare bold move and actually offered an all-new model. This time it was called the Sebring, making it the car most suited for actually visiting its namesake. (Close runner-up: Chevrolet Suburban.) The Sebring continued the LeBaron’s tradition by offering four usable seats, a cushy ride, a reasonable price and – most importantly – a top that went up and down. No, it still wasn’t a great car. But the ragtop Sebring sold in such high numbers that you had to wonder: “are there really this many mothers-in-law?”

Toyota Joins the Party

Toyota must’ve been wondering the very same thing. That’s because the 1999 model year heralded the debut of the Camry Solara, a two-door Camry with an available soft top that appealed to Sebring buyers with slightly higher standards. Once again, these sold in enormous numbers, a fact that Toyota commemorated by creating a second-generation model that actually was enormous. Seriously: at 192.5 inches, it was the exact same length as a Land Cruiser. Most of that bulk was in the rear, as Toyota wanted to include a place to store the top, trunk space, and – from the looks of it – a lighted indoor racquetball court.

For several years, Toyota and Chrysler went at it in the four-seat droptop market, with Chrysler earning the price-conscious bottom-feeders and Toyota snagging people who wanted a well-built convertible the size of a botanical garden.

But the rivalry only lasted a few years.

In 2008, Toyota announced it would be cancelling the Solara after the 2009 model year. And with the Sebring’s 2008 redesign, prices rose to stratospheric levels that the droptop’s build quality simply couldn’t justify. Today’s Chrysler 200 convertible starts at $28,000 with shipping, and it includes an interior that looks like this:

Ouch.

What Happened?

My question is: what the hell happened to the world of reasonably-priced four-seat convertibles? During the early 1990s, it wasn’t possible to cruise around in the summer and not see 40-year-old divorcees driving LeBarons. During the early 2000s, every single middle school had a teachers’ lot full of Sebring convertibles. And in the late 2000s, you couldn’t enter a parking garage without getting stuck behind a Solara owner hitting everything in close proximity while backing out of a parking spot.

Yes, the Ford Mustang and Chevrolet Camaro still exist. But both of those are rear-wheel drive sports cars with beefy styling and a high-performance image. That’s not quite suitable for the Sebring convertible set, who just wants to cruise around in top-down bliss without concern for performance, or acceleration, or anything, really. The Volkswagen Eos would be perfect, but its base price is more than $35,000. Truly. In fact, the “Eos Executive,” whatever that is, starts at $42,000. For a four-cylinder Volkswagen based on the Golf.

Interestingly, it seems like Honda and Nissan could enter this segment tomorrow and walk away with it. Both already offer two-door versions of their midsize sedans. Would it be so hard to chop off the roof, create a convertible, and price it around $25,000? Or maybe $27,000, if the interior has a little less cheap plastic than the Chrysler 200?

Apparently, it would be too hard – or Nissan and Honda think the market just doesn’t exist. That means today’s children will grow up with only one universal truth: the Lamborghini Aventador is really cool. See you in thirty years.

Doug DeMuro operates PlaysWithCars.com. He’s owned an E63 AMG wagon, road-tripped across the US in a Lotus without air conditioning, and posted a six-minute lap time on the Circuit de Monaco in a rented Ford Fiesta. One year after becoming Porsche Cars North America’s youngest manager, he quit to become a writer. His parents are very disappointed.

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Psycho Love: Sticking Your Key In Crazy http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/04/psycho-love-sticking-your-key-in-crazy/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/04/psycho-love-sticking-your-key-in-crazy/#comments Mon, 15 Apr 2013 17:19:00 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=484511 I saw it this morning. Slipping along the in the dim, pre-dawn light and shrouded in the thin early morning fog that wicked up in wispy tendrils from the damp pavement, it was an apparition, a beast from another age. Like poor Yorick, alas I knew it well and although, in time, it has become […]

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Click here to view the embedded video.

I saw it this morning. Slipping along the in the dim, pre-dawn light and shrouded in the thin early morning fog that wicked up in wispy tendrils from the damp pavement, it was an apparition, a beast from another age. Like poor Yorick, alas I knew it well and although, in time, it has become the subject of infinite jest, it was in its day the most excellent fancy of many young men and it bore my youthful dreams upon its back a thousand times. It had, I thought, no right to be among the living when so many other, better, vehicles of its era were consigned to their graves, rotting away in fields, pulled apart for their components or crushed, shredded and melted wholesale back into their base elements. Why then, knowing through the clarifying lens of history the terrible truth about the trouble that lurked beneath its slick sheet metal, did its unexpected appearance stir a long-forgotten longing in my heart?

“May you live,” So goes the Chinese curse, “in interesting times.” Now well into my 40s, I can tell you that the times, especially from an automotive standpoint, have indeed been interesting. Waxing less rhapsodic, there has been a whole lot of suck built in the last four decades but the awful truth is that some of those cars still set my heart aflutter. I’m not sure what the attraction is, honestly. Is it the curve of a fender, the sweep of a windshield, or is it the fact that just seeing one sends me back to a more innocent time in my life when many of these cars were aspirational? I don’t know.

20/20 hindsight tells me many of these cars lack power and have an unacceptably high level of fuel consumption. They lack most real, modern safety equipment. They lack build quality, hell most of them came off the assembly line with issues, but I still fantasize about them. Crazy as it may seem, the following are “bad cars” that I would like to own –

Pontiac Grand Prix GTP

It’s hard to tell people today what a breath of fresh air the 1991 Pontiac Grand Prix was. It looked clean and its plastic body cladding accentuated just the right spots, making the car look wide and muscular. Door handles up on the door frame seemed like a real innovation as well and the interior, complete with buttons on the steering wheel and various switches mounted on the gauge cowl made feel like you were sitting in a rocketship. In GTP trim, the V6 produced more than 200 horsepower and could be had with an automatic or a stick. Frankly, I thought these cars looked great back in the day, and I think they look pretty darn good today, too.

Chrysler LeBaron Turbo, Coupe

When Kitty changed her name to Karen and traded her MG for a white Chrylser LeBaron, this is the one the she got. With their long hood line and short rear deck lids, the mid to late 80s Chrysler LeBarons are still, in my opinion, one of the best looking cars ever. By 1990 a V6 had been added to the mix, but I am a Chrysler Turbo guy and that would be my first choice. I understand that the 148 horsepower turbo could also be ordered with a 5 speed manual, but I have never seen one in person. Inside they are “budget plush” and they don’t come anywhere equaling the interior design and build quality of a modern sub compact like the new Dart, but they were functional and comfortable enough for long trips. Many convertible LeBarons have survived into the present day and I even see them offered occasionally on the Buffalo area Craigslist at reasonable prices, but my preference is for the coupe.

Jaguar XJS- V12

When I was a kid I used to stay up past my bed time and watch a British TV show called “The New Avengers.” I don’t remember much about it, but one thing that has stuck in my mind was the car used in the show, a pre-production Jaguar XJS-V12. They have terrible reputations, I know, but that classic shape, the hand built interiors and the idea of 12 cylinders under the hood stills sets my heart aflutter. I would love to own one of these, providing I could find one in good condition and then not have to rely upon it. As usual, my inclination is to avoid the convertible and stick with the coupe.

So there you have it, three “bad cars” that I would still love to own. Don’t try to talk me out of it, love is a funny thing. Fortunately, I am in a committed relationship so I won’t be sticking my key in crazy anytime soon. Tell me though, validate my unexpected rush of emotion and tell us about the cars that bring out your own psycho love.

Thomas M Kreutzer currently lives in Buffalo, New York with his wife and three children but has spent most of his adult life overseas. He has lived in Japan for 9 years, Jamaica for 2 and spent almost 5 years as a US Merchant Mariner serving primarily in the Pacific. A long time auto and motorcycle enthusiast he has pursued his hobbies whenever possible. He also enjoys writing and public speaking where, according to his wife, his favorite subject is himself.

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Junkyard Find: 1991 and 1993 Chrysler LeBaron Convertibles http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/06/junkyard-find-1991-and-1993-chrysler-lebaron-convertibles/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/06/junkyard-find-1991-and-1993-chrysler-lebaron-convertibles/#comments Wed, 20 Jun 2012 13:00:44 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=449497 One of the worst things about the Malaise Era (other than the ascendance of Captain and Tennile) was the lack of cars with convertible tops during the period. The last convertible Cadillac Eldorado rolled off the assembly line in 1976, but the decline of the convertible had started a few years earlier. The top-down drought […]

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One of the worst things about the Malaise Era (other than the ascendance of Captain and Tennile) was the lack of cars with convertible tops during the period. The last convertible Cadillac Eldorado rolled off the assembly line in 1976, but the decline of the convertible had started a few years earlier. The top-down drought held until the last of the Malaise years, when machines such as Rabbit Cabriolets and LeBaron convertibles became available. Chrysler kept making the K-based LeBaron convertible until 1995, but you don’t see many of them these days. Here’s a pair of early-90s examples I found side-by-side in a Denver wrecking yard.
For 1991, the LeBaron was nominally built on the Chrysler J platform, but it was really the good old K at heart. By 1993, a restyle made the car look less like something that had stepped out of 1981.
If I’m ever shopping for a cheap convertible with good parts availability, I know what I’ll get!

08 - Chrysler LeBarons Convertibles Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Phil Greden 04 - Chrysler LeBarons Convertibles Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Phil Greden 05 - Chrysler LeBarons Convertibles Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Phil Greden Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail

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Junkyard Find: 1979 Chrysler LeBaron http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/01/junkyard-find-1979-chrysler-lebaron/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/01/junkyard-find-1979-chrysler-lebaron/#comments Fri, 27 Jan 2012 13:00:04 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=428246 By early 1979, Chrysler was really circling the drain. Lee Iacocca was in, the “too big to fail” government bailout loan wasn’t a sure thing, rebadged Simcas and Mitsubishis weren’t luring many subcompact shoppers into showrooms, and the front-wheel-drive K platform was still a couple of years from showrooms. Let’s follow up yesterday’s Chrysler Malaise […]

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By early 1979, Chrysler was really circling the drain. Lee Iacocca was in, the “too big to fail” government bailout loan wasn’t a sure thing, rebadged Simcas and Mitsubishis weren’t luring many subcompact shoppers into showrooms, and the front-wheel-drive K platform was still a couple of years from showrooms. Let’s follow up yesterday’s Chrysler Malaise Era Death Spiral Junkyard Find with the quasi-luxury car Chrysler hoped would help the company stagger, zombie-like, into the 1980s.
Actually, Iacocca’s strategy was successful, so I can’t be too hard on them; the K Cars sold like crazy, the company paid of the government loans on time, and the Diplomat-based LeBaron was forgotten. Hey, is that soft Corinthian Leather? It is!
Did Chrysler offer opera lights on the K-based LeBaron? I might have to go back and get these units for my A100.
I’ve ridden in a few of these, and they really weren’t terrible cars; the 318 was an unkillable, if weak, powerplant, the chassis gave a fairly decent ride, and the goofy crypto-luxurious interior appointments really added something to the ambiance when you were cranking Motörhead with your loadie friends in a $75 LeBaron in 1987. One thing you could say about Chrysler in 1979 that you couldn’t have said about AMC was that the future offered a dim flicker of hope.
Yes, power locks were still a big deal in the late 1970s. Unless the car was German, they didn’t work after a few years, but check out this classy lock knob!
The question to ask yourself now is: would you take a ’79 LeBaron or an ’82 LeBaron on a cross-country road trip? I think I’d be willing to take the 10 MPG fuel-economy hit of the older version.

30 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 01 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 03 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 04 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 06 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 07 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 08 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 09 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 10 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 11 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 12 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 14 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 16 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 17 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 18 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 19 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 20 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 21 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 22 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 23 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 24 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 25 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden 28 - 1979 Chrysler LeBaron Down On The Junkyard - Picture Courtesy of Phillip 'Chrysler Was Too Big To Fail' Greden

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Adventures In Used Car Sales, Recession Edition: Get In Here! http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/adventures-in-used-car-sales-recession-edition-get-in-here/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/08/adventures-in-used-car-sales-recession-edition-get-in-here/#comments Wed, 24 Aug 2011 18:30:11 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=408530 Way back in 2008, I created the Nice Price or Crack Pipe? series for Jalopnik, kicking things off with— of course— a $12,500 Chrysler TC By Maserati. NCOCP was a way for me to do something with car ads that didn’t quite work for my Project Car Hell series, and it has remained a Jalopnik […]

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Way back in 2008, I created the Nice Price or Crack Pipe? series for Jalopnik, kicking things off with— of course— a $12,500 Chrysler TC By Maserati. NCOCP was a way for me to do something with car ads that didn’t quite work for my Project Car Hell series, and it has remained a Jalopnik readership favorite since I passed the NPOCP torch to the very capable hands of Graverobber aka Robert Emslie. These days, however, I sometimes see cars for sale that make me wonder… hubba rocks required or real-world price? While in Wisconsin last week, I saw this fairly solid ’91 Lebaron convertible in a laundromat parking lot with this very compelling self-service invitation. How much?
Hmmm… $3,250? The Kelley Blue Book website says a private-party-seller 108,000-mile LeBaron convertible with six-cylinder engine in good condition should be worth $1,650 in Wisconsin.
It hasn’t been driven in winter since 2001, but it appears to suffer from multiple electrical problems, oil leaks, and other stuff I can’t quite make out. I’m sure these things are quite rare in the rusty Upper Midwest, so perhaps that buyer who’s been jonesing for a clean LeBaron convertible will come along and get in there.
SuchADealLeBaron-LH_Rr SuchADealLeBaron-Details SuchADealLeBaron-Frt SuchADealLeBaron-GETINHERE Zemanta Related Posts Thumbnail

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Junkyard Find: 1981 Chrysler LeBaron http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/07/junkyard-find-1981-chrysler-lebaron/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/07/junkyard-find-1981-chrysler-lebaron/#comments Wed, 06 Jul 2011 13:10:22 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=401638 Chrysler has used the LeBaron name on and off since the 1930s, and the prestige level of the LeBaron badge has been on a gradual downward spiral all along. Some may disagree with that assessment, however, depending on whether they judge the transition from the M (Dodge Diplomat) platform to the K platform in 1982 […]

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Chrysler has used the LeBaron name on and off since the 1930s, and the prestige level of the LeBaron badge has been on a gradual downward spiral all along. Some may disagree with that assessment, however, depending on whether they judge the transition from the M (Dodge Diplomat) platform to the K platform in 1982 to have been a step up or a step down. I think the presence of a Slant Six under the hood disqualifies any vehicle from claiming luxury status, and that’s what we’ve got here.

GM and Ford were also cashing out the prestige capital they’d built up in their luxury marques during the Malaise Era, so Chrysler wasn’t alone in this process. And the Diplomat was a perfectly competent and solid machine, well suited to both commuting and police duty. But… luxury and Slant Six don’t mix. Chrysler would have been better off making this the top Diplomat trim level and selling the car as a Diplomat Brougham d’Class or something.

Then there’s the painfully fake wood dash trim and gumball-machine-trinket-quality glovebox emblems staring the passenger in the face as he or she attempts to feel true Chrysler exclusivity.
DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-15 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-01 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-02 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-03 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-04 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-05 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-06 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-07 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-08 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-09 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-10 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-11 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-12 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-13 DOTJ-81LeBaronSilver-14

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Rich, Wind-Tunnel-Defying Simu-Wood™ Trim Adds Style To Reagan-Era Chrysler Town & Country http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/01/rich-wind-tunnel-defying-simu-wood%e2%84%a2-trim-adds-style-to-reagan-era-chrysler-town-country/ http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/01/rich-wind-tunnel-defying-simu-wood%e2%84%a2-trim-adds-style-to-reagan-era-chrysler-town-country/#comments Tue, 25 Jan 2011 14:00:21 +0000 http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/?p=381770 Thick faux-wood trim on a Chrysler wagon as late as 1986? Hey, it’s 2011 and you can still get Super 8 movie film! I can’t decide whether this is the most hideous station wagon ever made or one of the greatest. Chrysler had gone entirely front-wheel-drive by ’86, and their minivan was already delivering multiple […]

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Thick faux-wood trim on a Chrysler wagon as late as 1986? Hey, it’s 2011 and you can still get Super 8 movie film!

I can’t decide whether this is the most hideous station wagon ever made or one of the greatest. Chrysler had gone entirely front-wheel-drive by ’86, and their minivan was already delivering multiple tire-iron-to-the-kidneys blows to station wagon sales… yet they still honored the 5,500-pound wagons they’d built 15 years before.

The K platform made for shockingly spacious interiors; this wagon rivaled some of the monstrous battlecruiser wagons of years past for interior space.

Turbocharged and fuel-injected! Too bad they never made a Shelby-ized LeBaron Town & Country. This car listed at $11,998 with the turbo package, about the same as an ’86 VW Quantum wagon and $1,500 less than an ’86 Volvo 245 Turbo wagon or an ’86 Olds Custom Cruiser.

DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-20 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-01 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-02 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-03 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-04 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-05 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-06 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-07 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-08 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-09 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-10 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-11 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-12 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-14 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-15 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-16 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-17 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-18 DOTJ-86TownAndCountryWagon-19

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