By on August 20, 2015

 

A Brooks Stevens concept.

A Brooks Stevens concept.

Aaron Cole’s post about automotive patent art gladdened my heart. Years ago, I decided to check out some of Les Paul and Leo Fender’s original patents on their electric guitars and I discovered the artistry of patent drawings. These days the United States Patent and Trademark Office, as well as patent offices around the world, accept digitally produced artwork. However, before the digital age, an inventor had to hire someone skilled at technical drawing to produce the various exploded and see-through sketches needed to describe the “preferred embodiment” of a process patent.

Of course the “inventor” of a design patent — a slightly different form of intellectual property that protects the design and look of a product — is more often than not, the actual designer.

Following up on Aaron’s post, I decided to put the names of some notable automotive designers into a patent search engine to see what I could find. My hypothesis was that in the case of a design patent, particularly for a car, the artwork for the patent application was likely to have been drawn by the designer. A patent is a big deal to any engineer or designer and he’d likely want to be the one responsible for representing his own idea best.

(Read More…)

By on July 13, 2015

IMG_0602

Polymath sports marketer Fred Sharf is known in the art world for finding underappreciated genres, collecting them, researching and writing about them at an academic level, curating exhibits about them, and then donating much of what he collects to museums so others can share his eclectic interests. Among those many interests, Sharf has almost singlehandedly gotten the fine art world to start appreciating the art involved with making automobiles. Drawings and paintings long considered disposable styling studio work product by car companies are now considered collectible and worthy of art museum exhibitions. (Read More…)

By on January 22, 2012

After years of retrenching, financial crisis and bankruptcies, the world’s automakers are now introducing new concept and production vehicles. The 2012 NAIAS in Detroit was one of the more product-rich big auto shows of the past decade. Just about every exhibitor at the show was revealing all-new vehicles or concepts giving us a look at future production plans. Cadillac’s 3 Series fighter, the ATS, Lincoln’s all new and attractive MKZ, Ford’s Aston-Martin looking Fusion and Chrysler’s Alfa Romeo based Dodge Dart were all significant new introductions by the domestics. Toyota showed concepts that will probably end up as the next Camry and Prius (plus Lexus’ stunning LF-LC concept that will most likely not see production). Mercedes introduced the first all-new SL roadster in a decade.  Hyundai showed the highly anticipated Veloster Turbo. I could go down the list of exhibitors with other examples but you get the idea: lots of significant new product. However, over at the far end of Cobo Hall, tucked away upstairs in a corner of the Lincoln exhibit, was probably the most significant car of the entire show.  I suppose you could call it a concept car, but it represents a concept that is larger than just the design of one individual car. It’s one of the cars that can be said to have been part of the invention of automotive styling. I think that makes it the most significant car, new or old, at the 2012 NAIAS. (Read More…)

By on December 7, 2010

This car is a jaw-dropper, a true classic, and a lucky find that rivals the CC logomobile, but it’s misnamed. By all rights, it should be the Edsel American. It was Edsel Ford’s fine taste and encouragement that made the original version of this trend-setting car happen, and in the process created a car that set the template that every American personal luxury coupe/convertible has been trying to measure up to ever since. An aggressive face on a very long hood, a close-coupled body, a short rear deck, and dripping with the aura of exclusivity and sex: a timeless formula. All too few of the endless imitators got the ingredients right, or even close, as our recent Cougar CC so painfully showed. But that didn’t stopped them from trying, just like I never stopped looking for this Continental after I first saw it almost two years ago. It was well worth the effort. (Read More…)

Recent Comments

  • Re: No Fixed Abode: Dealers Gone Wild!

    Suto - High schools should make sure that every student has a good grasp on 8-9th grade algebra. Unless the kid is a computer nerd or wants to be a carpenter or...
  • Re: No Fixed Abode: Dealers Gone Wild!

    Kendahl - The only thing Destiny and her mother might salvage from this disaster is interest on the loan. Destiny should put every spare dime into paying off the loan...
  • Re: No Fixed Abode: Dealers Gone Wild!

    mankyman - Great story. These types of things do happen to young white dudes too though. It’s not just financial illiteracy that makes dealers happy. They also...
  • Re: No Fixed Abode: Dealers Gone Wild!

    bullnuke - Jeff Wyler…serving the credit challenged of Southwest and South Springfield for many years. Can’t afford our Toyotas? Take a 34-step walk over to...
  • Re: No Fixed Abode: Dealers Gone Wild!

    NoID - Well consider: Even if the dealer makes only one sale per working day, and captures that $700 doc fee: Figure 300 sales days in a year (52 weeks, minus Sundays...
  • Re: QOTD: What Should Replace the Chrysler 200?

    DeadWeight - No jobs will be lost (jobs will probably be added), as the all-new,upcoming 2017 RAM will be built at Sterling Heights Assembly Plant (which built...
  • Re: No Fixed Abode: Dealers Gone Wild!

    Compaq Deskpro - Dealer sold me the lifetime warranty with $100 deductible for $2500, which can be bought on the internet for $2185, doc fee was $1000, interest rate was...
  • Re: No Fixed Abode: Dealers Gone Wild!

    NoID - I’ve heard of dealers baking in penalties for independent financing into the base price (so they can magically find money to take out if they finance...
  • Re: QOTD: What Should Replace the Chrysler 200?

    Compaq Deskpro - You think sedans are going to decline as fast as wagons in the 80’s or 2 door SUV’s in the 90’s? If that’s the case,...
  • Re: General Motors CEO Mary Barra Chosen for Trump Advisory Panel

    agent534 - Free trade deals with countries having insanely low gdp per capita have the obvious effect, the people there will never be a market...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Seth Parks, United States
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Kyree Williams, United States