By on September 7, 2017

2018 Chrysler 300 Limited - Image: FCAOnly two models remain in Fiat Chrysler Automobiles’ U.S. Chrysler lineup, but both models will benefit from dramatic price cuts for the 2018 model year.

The 2017 Chrysler 300 was marketed with a U.S. base price of $33,435. That car, the Chrysler 300 Limited, will be renamed for 2018 as the Touring L, CarsDirect reports, one notch above the 300 Touring. Meanwhile, the Chrysler 300C loses its standard V6 engine and is now sold exclusively with the 5.7-liter V8 and rear-wheel drive.

As for the 2018 Chrysler Pacifica, a new Pacifica L below the Pacifica LX allows the 2018 Pacifica to sit well below the Honda Odyssey and Toyota Sienna in the minivan price hierarchy. 

2018 Chrysler Pacifica Touring L Plus - Image: FCAPriced from $28,090 for 2018, including destination fees, the Chrysler Pacifica’s MSRP will be $1,800 less costly than the former entry-level Chrysler minivan, the 2017 Pacifica LX.

The all-new 2018 Honda Odyssey is priced from $30,930. The Toyota Sienna, refreshed modestly yet again for MY2018, starts at $30,745 in 2017.

The 2018 Chrysler 300, meanwhile, will now enjoy a base price of just $30,090, a $3,345 cut from 2017. CarsDirect says the 2018 300 Touring will still 18-inch alloys and the same standard 3.6-liter Pentastar V6.

In August, with the discontinued 200 nearly cleared out and remaining Town & Countrys just about gone, total Chrysler U.S. volume fell by a third to only 12,652 units, the brand’s lowest-volume month since January 2011. (Chrysler averaged 27,000 monthly sales only two years ago.) Year-to-date, sales of the Chrysler 300 are down 8 percent to 35,436. At that rate of decline, calendar year 300 volume will fall to a six-year low. Though Pacifica volume is up 186 percent, year-over-year, total Chrysler brand minivan sales are down 9 percent.

Both remaining Chrysler vehicles operate in shrinking sectors. Sales of full-size mainstream brand sedans are down 15 percent this year. Minivan volume has fallen 12 percent.

* Correction: an earlier version of this post indicated the 300 Touring would come standard with leather seats. Having updated its information, CarsDirect now tells TTAC, “the 300 Touring will in fact come standard with cloth seats.”

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars and Instagram.

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64 Comments on “FCA’s Remaining Pentastar Product Pair, the Chrysler 300 and Chrysler Pacifica, See Prices Slashed for 2018...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Meanwhile, the Chrysler 300C loses its standard V6 engine and is now sold exclusively with the 5.7-liter V8 and rear-wheel drive.”

    A model dropped the V6 and went V8 only?

    Unpossible.

    • 0 avatar
      MLS

      Back to the way it was in the first generation 2005-2010 model, and better aligned with the historic “letter series” cars.

      Also, CarsDirect is wrong about the new, entry-level 300 Touring model’s having leather seats. Per FCA, cloth seats will be standard.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Yes it always makes me very sad when I occasionally see a 300 with the “standard” cloth interior. It makes the interior of Grandma’s Cutlass Ciera S look luxurious.

    • 0 avatar
      bryanska

      That spells the end for me, as big a fan (and owner) of the car as I am. The V6 was well reviewed and generally known to be the smart choice for the car. No AWD is awfully defeatist too.

      That’s a rapid tapering given the resources and variations poured into the Charger. That car must be doing much better.

  • avatar
    YeOldeMobile

    I actually do like the look, interior and exterior, of the two Chryslers. I just can’t see myself ever buying them.

    • 0 avatar

      The 300 is a holdout in the Town Car / Grand Marquis class. I fear it has not long left. We’ll still have the CT6 to compensate, albeit at a much higher price point.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        2 things keeping me from a 300 V8.

        1. No faith that it will be painless to take to 200,000 miles

        2. If I would want to dump it after the warranty, no faith that the residuals will be worth a dang.

        • 0 avatar

          The cosmetic issues I see on younger examples worry me, and I tend to agree. Lasting quality and resale value are not there, image issues aside. After the warranty it may be worth $9,000.

          • 0 avatar
            deanst

            I’ve toured most of the auto plants in Ontario, and for some reason the FCA Brampton plant just struck me as a place where vehicles were slapped together. I got a better vibe from the Oshawa complex – despite the numerous holes in the roof, dealt with by hanging huge sheets of plastic guiding the water to garbage cans. (They were in the middle of contract negotiations, so I wonder if this was some sort of psychological warfare by gm, or if this was always the way they handled these things!)

          • 0 avatar
            MLS

            Curious about the cosmetic issues you’re referring to.

          • 0 avatar

            Things like failing weather stripping, peeling finish on black trim around the windows. All on 2011+ vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            CaddyDaddy

            Auto Plants usually have no value past the current user. A leaking roof adds no shareholder value and only increases cost when repaired which goes against executive bonus or union member wage increases. Roof Leaks who cares. Unfortunately, GM feels the same about worn out machine tools and low-grade materials deep in the drive line.

        • 0 avatar
          ahintofpepperjack

          The 300 with the 5.7L V8 has been in production on this platform for over 10 years now. There are a ton of these cars with over 200K, even 300K if you look on the forums.

          The LX platform is your safest bet if you’re going to buy an FCA product.

        • 0 avatar

          Go online and look at prices on V8 LX cars they take a decent first year hit then seem to hold there value well from there on out. 10 year old ones still fetch 11k here in the North East.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Here comes some truth. It’s just objective info to anyone experiencing these vehicles:

          1) Pentastar V6 is a beacon of refinement, power, efficiency and is also fairly reliable at the new and well-used markers.

          2) ZF-Clone 8-speed transmission is as good as automatics get.

          3) 300 has very stout/rigid chassis with outstanding torsional rigidity.

          4) 30p has excellent ride quality and is very quiet even at high freeway speeds.

          5) 300 has better quality interior than any Cadillac (way better than CT6, ATS, XTS, and better than XT5, CTS or Escalade).

          6) The Hemi sounds great and is badassery Americana in a bold American Sedan, proper, but the V6 is more refined and powerful than GM’s so-so 3.6 liter.

          6) At 26k to 35k depending on equipment, the 300 is a better, more refined, more comfortable, more stout, better vehicle in almost every/any way than any Cadillac at any price.

          The 300 is not only any awesome vehicle in a proven, stout chassis, with an excellent motor (V6 or V8) and excellent transmission, but it’s an absolute steal at its real world ATP, and better by far than any Cadillac save possibly for the CTS-V.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            p.s. – While the 300 in V6 or V8 and rwd or awd trim shames nearly any Cadillac, it positively embarrasses anything from Chevrolet or Buick.

            The Impala and LaCrosse are positively inferior.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            1) I prefer the GM engine, at least unless I’m trying to go 200k miles. It’s got a more entertaining high end and a better sound. Both engines are pretty refined.

            2) True.

            3) True, although you wouldn’t know it to listen to the interior creaks.

            4) True.

            5) Haha lol DeadWeight must have had a few Ketels. It may look better in your subjective judgment, but materials are mediocre. Now they’re also mediocre or worse on some Cadillacs (ATS and Escalade come quickly to mind, and if you think Escalade is OK at its price, well…), but the CT6 and XTS do much better than the 300.

            6) Refined: judgment call. Powerful: no. Most applications of the GM 3.6 outpower the non-S Pentastar by between 10 and 30 horsepower.

            7) Your case makes sense, notwithstanding the above, if you can find a 300 that shows zero signs of assembly by stoned slackers. I’ve rented many, and I’m not sure I’ve ever seen one. Fit and finish is a massive issue with these cars and probably knocks $5000 off the amount FCA can get for each one.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            I was going to say the interior of an Escalade Platinum is really hard to beat. Its some of the nicest leather outside of a RR/Bentley.

          • 0 avatar
            redapple

            This man is correct. 100%

          • 0 avatar
            redapple

            I think DW said 2 years ago. Caddy should buy 300 s and rebadge them.
            300 is a very good car.
            God in his infinite wisdom made all animals rear end drive.
            (old axle plant guy)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree with Dal’s conclusion. If FCA could adapt the Toyota production method I believe 300 would be much more popular and not take the dive it does on trade for the reasons cited.

  • avatar

    What city is in the headline pic? I see a Michigan plate, but I’m pretty sure that skyline is too modern to be Detroit.

    Also I thought the 300C and 300S were just trim packages, and the V6/V8 were available across the line.

  • avatar
    kkop

    Was this article purposely set up to make me hunt for information? What a disjointed mess. Why not list old and new price in same paragraph?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Probably because they posted the new price, and the exact difference between it and the former base price. Seems pretty simple to me. You know what the new price is, you know the difference between it and the old price, listing the old price would be redundant in my book.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Why not give Chrysler a version of the Durango, and perhaps a smaller crossover based on Cherokee (maybe stretched to compete with Edge and Murano)? At least then some of their vehicles wouldn’t be in a declining segmemt.

    A 3 row lux’d up SUV (with higher profit margins than Pacifica) and a decent crossover sounds like it would give Chrysler a shot at avoiding being laid to rest between Plymouth and Eagle in the graveyard of car brands.

    I still say that a heavily restyled version of the 500L sold as a reborn PT Cruiser couldn’t possibly hurt.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      The Chrysler Aspen (rebadged Dodge Durango) was tried once before and didn’t sell well IIRC. It was marketed from 2007 to 2009.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        That’s because it was the old POS Durango, and that was leading up to and during the recession.

        In case you haven’t noticed, today’s Durango is a very competitive SUV, and shares only its name with the rolling pile of garbage that was the 2nd gen.

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          True dat. FCA may still be a little snake-bit over it though and not willing to try it again especially with a faltering brand. Might be better as a re-imagined Ramcharger.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            That might be the case, but I still say its worth a shot.

            The only two (retail, so not including large vans) segments that aren’t teetering or in a state of decline would be big pickups and S/CUVs. Since a Chrysler pickup would be even more absurd, leveraging the company’s utilities seems the only logical path.

            A new minivan was a logical step, since they have had that market cornered since they created it, but that isn’t enough IMO to sustain Chrysler as a brand.

            I’d rather see a brash new 300, a sporty midsize RWD sedan (Giulia-based), and so on, but that would be throwing good money after bad, those segments aren’t coming back anytime soon. Might as well go with what the buying public obviously want and are willing to pay for.

      • 0 avatar

        The Aspen was turrible.

      • 0 avatar
        Whatnext

        Yeah, well right as the Great Recession hit wasn’t the best time to launch a big SUV.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Why? Is there actually such a thing as a stand-alone Chrysler dealership? Are there any that don’t sell Jeeps? I don’t see the point in selling identical vehicles with different badges. If you want a Durango, buy a Durango.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Right, because it doesn’t work for Cadillac. Lots of Cadillac dealers also carry GMC, yet the Escalade still sells quite well and makes GM a lot of money. Selling well and making money is something Chrysler needs desperately.

        Pretty sure I didn’t say “identical”, I said “lux’d up”, as in a more elegant, softer, quieter and better equipped vehicle based on the Durango. For someone cross-shopping luxury SUVs, a Dodge-branded vehicle wouldn’t be on their list, and as of now, Jeep doesn’t offer a 3 row SUV.

        There is a difference in selling a vehicle that is based on another, and selling one that is a simple rebadge. I was suggesting the former.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @JohnT, yes but GM famously has 0 discipline when it comes to these things.

          Not long ago on this very website GMC head was musing about a GMC based on the Encore/Trax.

          Don’t forget that the Yukon Denali was originally supposed to be a Cadillac but the Cadillac dealers didn’t want it, until they saw the barrels of money GMC dealers were raking in and threw a fit.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            I don’t deny any of that (except I think it was Lincoln cashing in on the Navigator that had Cadillac up in arms), but it still seems like a win for Chrysler.

            It certainly seems better than hoping that an old-as-the-hills full size sedan and a minivan can carry the brand, especially when the former is likely to be axed soon enough (probably without a Chrysler-branded replacement).

    • 0 avatar

      Sergio seems to be a fan of lot’s of brands with little rebadging. That said the rumor is the Jeep Yuntu(k8) coming to China next year will spawn a 3 row Chrysler crossover. It will be in the hot small cuv segment and sit lower to make it distinct from the jeep models.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I have long been tempted by the 300 with the V8. Non turbo V8s are rare birds these days, as is RWD.

    Big enough up front discounts and it still could be a heck of a buy…

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Its about time to get the price right. They sell it $8K off anyways

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Chrysler and Dodge are basically dead. Chrysler sells the new Pacifica which is great, every vehicle dodge sells is past its expiration date. They aint getting replaced. Maybe refreshed. Of the two brands (Chrysler Dodge) The only products that matter are probably the Pacifica and Charger. I don’t think there will ever be push to expand either of these two brands beyond those two vehicles at some point in time. As long as they are attached to Jeep and Ram dealerships they don’t need more product, don’t want more product because they will not sell and will not command the prices Ram trucks and Jeeps can so there is no incentive to share any Jeep Platforms with Dodge or Chrysler. Perhaps the best chance for expanded lineups would come from Fiat products but you are dreaming if you think an Alfa or Maserati platform will be used on a Chrysler/Dodge. Chrysler Punto anyone?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I’ve got it! FCA can whip up a traditional full size Imperial by taking a 2500 chassis with the 6.4 Hemi, and dropping a lux body on it. They’d end up with something approximating the 1973 Imperial Lebaron, with a 140″ wheelbase and 235″ overall length sedan with a huge back seat that could double as a limo, and the chassis handles 4WD. They’re practically making them already, just drop the bed and extend the cab behind the front seats, with a decent size trunk. They’d sell hundreds of ’em!

    • 0 avatar

      Well the Challenger does outsell the Camaro and Mustang lately. They also sell quite a few Journeys.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    FCA finally clues in that their high sales numbers with minivans were because they were cheep.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      They’ve known that for a long while. It might be something worse: they’re giving up margin because of a cash-flow crunch. If that’s true, we’re WAY behind on the death watch.

      • 0 avatar

        They know the price thing. They extended the Grand Caravan because of it. Now that their getting ready to ramp that down they will need to have cheaper versions of the Pacifica to make up for it. My guess is this was planned long ago.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      This reminds me of the old “America” versions of the K-Cars and Sundance/Shadow and Omni/Horizon. Maybe they can get Lee Iacocca back for commercials.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    What equipment are they cutting out of the Pacifica LX to get to that price point? It only comes in white with steel wheels, no A/C, and crank windows?

    It will probably make a great fleet vehicle or advertisingbprice point car, but the LX already eschewed power doors, liftgate, etc. The cloth interior was actually pretty nice, but I can’t see anyone even offering a car without power windows, locks, air, and a half decent stereo. What’s left to cut out?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      They don’t have to cut anything. Selling at a lower price just shaves the margin. Even selling at cost is still cheaper than the costs of shutting down the factory. Every company in every industry has fixed overhead costs that have to be paid, and keeping the revenue coming, sometimes even at a loss, is less expensive than covering the fixed expenses with borrowing instead of revenue.

  • avatar
    backtees

    Of all my rentals over the past few years a black on black 300c for a 2 day, 600 mile round trip remains one of the best and most surprising jaunts.

    Comfortable, fast, 30+ mpg, roomy…..what a ride. Wish they had same new car demo as Buick so there would be some cream puff trades.

  • avatar
    Freddie

    I’ll find something nice to say about FCA…

    At this moment in time, they are NOT badge engineering minivans. The Pacifica and Grand Caravan are distinct vehicles.

    Remember, this is the company that could not be bothered to give the Plymouth and Dodge Neons different names.

  • avatar
    Sgt Beavis

    Man, FCA has really made a mess of things. And for what? To bring crappy Fiats and Alpas to the US market? What a cluster #$%@!

    It is amazing to me that the Chrysler brand only has two products left. The fact that there is no crossover tells me that they’ve given up on the brand and will eventually shut it down.

    At least Dodge has FOUR products. However even those are very long of tooth. At least they are desirable.

    Sergio has better get on his knees and pray, then sacrifice a virgin, then kill his first born, and so on. Because if Jeep and Ram’s market heads south for any significant amount of time, FCA is dead.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Chrysler and Dodge brands will eventually disappear from neglect. Jeep and Ram are the most valuable brands left.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      No they won’t. Sergio Marchionne’s last desperate move is to part out the company and hand off the proceeds to the stockholders (Agnelli Family:37%), leaving one empty hulk loaded with debt to file for bankruptcy.

      He may think he can sell off Dodge, by including a plant or two, and maybe sell off Fiat-Brazil, but the name of the beast is Fiat-Chrysler, and that’s the hulk that will be left to file, wiping out bondholders. The Agnelli’s are synonymous with Fiat, so that’s the worst way to get out of the car biz for them, but it may be the only way.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    I test drive a 2016 300C Platinum with the Hemi, it was great. There really is no substitute for the smooth pull of a V8. It’s was what a Cadillac Sedan de Ville should be today: big, fast and effortless.


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