By on September 9, 2017

2018 Camry Hybrid, Image: Evan Williams

As part of a larger group of automotive publications, TTAC has access to a variety of content. We wanted to bring you some of the unique content we think lives up to TTAC’s standards and offers legitimate insight or a properly critical viewpoint to car evaluation. This story, by Hybrid Cars author Evan Williams, showcases the 2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid.

Toyota’s replacement for its popular hybrid sedan – sales of which have been falling off this year – comes along with the thorough overhaul of its entire Camry line. After years of cars that were reliable, efficient, and perceived by some to be boring, Toyota wants the new model to be reliable, efficient, and fun to drive. No, really.

Toyota is selling the new Camry as being an emotional choice, not just a rational one. Chief Engineer Masato Katsumata called it “visceral.” A strong word for a family sedan.

The all-new car is the first to completely embrace Toyota’s new global architecture, or TNGA. The platform was first seen under the 2016 Prius, but the Camry is the first to use the new engines, transmissions, and double wishbone rear suspension that make up the ethos of TNGA.

2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid, Image: Evan Williams

With the new Camry Hybrid comes a new hybrid system. This uses the new Toyota Hybrid System II, the successor to the Hybrid Synergy Drive system. The engine is a 2.5-liter inline four that has variable valve timing, runs on the Atkinson cycle, and has a near-diesel 14.0:1 compression ratio. It also uses a new super lightweight 0w16 grade oil that further reduces internal friction and losses. Toyota touts greater than 40-percent thermal efficiency for the new engine.

By itself, the gas engine generates 176 horsepower and produces 163 lb-ft of torque over a wide range from 3,600 to 5,200 rpm. The electric motor makes 188 horsepower and 149 lb-ft, for a total system output of 208 horsepower.

Like the Prius, it uses either a 4.0 amp-hour, 259-volt lithium-ion or 6.5 Ah 245-volt nickel-metal hydride battery pack, depending on trim. But where the Prius uses the li-ion battery on the more expensive Eco trim, the Camry puts the lithium battery on the base LE trim.

2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid, Image: Evan Williams

Toyota thinks that the people most concerned with fuel economy and value will be buying the base trim. The SE and XLE are more expensive and heavier, so eking out every last tenth of a mile per gallon isn’t the priority. Putting the lighter li-ion battery in what is already the lightest car makes a big impact on fuel economy.

The Camry Hybrid LE has a Prius-beating EPA-rated 53 miles per gallon highway. The city number is impressive too, at 51, with 51 mpg combined. Sportier SE and luxury XLE models get 44 city, 47 highway, 44 combined. In my drive loop in an SE model, the computer reported 53 mpg on mostly rural highways. That was maintaining the speed limit, but not really trying to hypermile. Driving it like I wanted to empty the tank still achieved around 43 mpg.

Both battery packs are new, and smaller than before. Combined with the new platform, the packs go under the seat instead of in the trunk. The Camry hybrid has the same 15.1 cubic feet of trunk space as the gas-only car, and has a full-size opening when the rear seats are folded.

2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid, Image: Evan Williams

Toyota is offering the Camry Hybrid in the sporty SE trim, in addition to the LE and XLE luxury models. The SE is where I spent most of my day, and it’s nice to see a hybrid choice that has a sport trim available.

Unlike Camrys of the past, this SE really is sporty. It looks the part, with a new unique nose, 18-inch alloys, and vents on the rear. It also has a firmer suspension, one that actually makes this (as promised) a fun car to drive. The Camry is well damped, no longer floaty.

It will roll in corners, but it’s light years ahead of the old one. In my admittedly short drive, I thought it felt better than the 2017 Hyundai Sonata and Kia Optima hybrids. I’d put it in the same class as the Mazda 6 for fun-to-drive.

2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid, Image: Evan Williams

The hybrid system is now completely seamless. The on/off of the gas engine is only noticeable at full throttle, and then only because you can hear it. The switch from regenerative to hydraulic braking is felt with a slightly more snug grab from the brakes, but it’s still smooth.

The electric motor can propel the car at higher speeds than before, and offers a great shove of torque for merging and passing. Feel of the CVT is greatly improved, and it responds quickly. It now offers one of the best CVT experiences on the market.

Toyota has also removed all of the strange noises the old Camry Hybrid made. No more symphony of whirrs, hums, and clicks while driving. It doesn’t make strange noises after you shut it off anymore either.

2018 Toyota Camry, Image: Evan Williams

The LE and XLE trims offer a slightly softer ride, and a different nose, but still ride and handle well. The new Camry is stable, composed, and solid.

Inside, the interior is a massive improvement in design and materials from the last generation. The asymmetrical center stack may be polarizing to look at, but it’s well laid out and easy to use. Seats are comfortable, and despite the 1-inch lower roofline, there is still lots of space for passengers – even with the available panoramic roof.

The infotainment system uses Toyota’s newest Entune software. It doesn’t have Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, but Toyota says that’s to help protect user information and privacy. If demand is there, then Toyota can add those apps in later. At launch, it has Scout GPS, NPR, Slacker radio, and Yelp. It also has a new available Safety Connect system that gives emergency assistance much like GM’s OnStar system.

2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid, Image: Evan Williams

Toyota steps up the Camry in every way for 2018. It’s better to drive, better to look at, and better to use. Most importantly for hybrid buyers, it’s more efficient, too. It’s a win for what has been the best-selling car in America for 15 consecutive years.

The 2018 Camry is on sale now. The hybrid starts at $28,685 USD (including delivery) for the LE, $30,385 for SE and $31,135 for the XLE model.

[Images: © Evan Williams]

(An original version of this review appeared in Hybrid Cars.)

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84 Comments on “2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid First Drive – Who Needs a Prius?...”


  • avatar
    NeilM

    Interesting drivetrain, although the CVT would put me off. Moving the battery pack to under the seat — I assume the author means the back seat — puts it in the space normally occupied only by the gas tank. It would be interesting to know what effect that has had on (liquid) fuel capacity. Of course with this kind of economy a reduction in gas tank size may be no problem at all.

    That pointlessly over-styled center stack would offend me every time I drove the car.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Pretty much all Hybrids use CVTs, with the exception of a few Hondas that had manual transmissions (but the automatic option in those cars were CVTs, rest assured).

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        If by pretty much all Hybrids you are talking actual market share then yes because Toyota and Ford have sold the most Hybrids then yes.

        However there are lots of hybrids that don’t have CVTs. The Ioniq for example uses a dual clutch automated manual which is why it can beat the Prius in MPG thanks to the lack of losses in stead state cruise inherent in the Toyota and Ford systems. Honda doesn’t use a CVT in the Accord hybrid though it acts as though it has one, again w/o the losses of the Toyota/Ford system. Nissan uses a CVT in some of their Hybrids, but not in others. Mercedes doesn’t use a CVT in their Hybrids. I could go on.

        Fact is Hybridization is the elegant solution to the CVT, but the planetary CVT is not the long term solution to Hybridization.

        When the vehicle is in steady state cruise with a battery in the target SOC the Toyota and Fords have to use the Traction MG to generate the electricity needed to power the Range MG to create the link between the engine and wheels.

        The future will see more and more Hybrids like the Ioniq and Accord because they are simply more efficient with lower losses between the engine and wheels.

      • 0 avatar
        guardian452

        Toyota HSD is not a CVT. It’s a planetary gearset, with ICE connected to sun gear, motor 1 connected to planet carrier, and motor 2 connected to the ring (final drive).

        Change the fluid every 100k and they will last forever (eventually old fluid will (a) break down winding insulation and (b) become conductive. The complexity is in the software.

        It’s one of the simplest transmission designs you can imagine.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          My Altima hybrid also uses a Toyota sourced CVT. The first one was still shifting fine at 140K when the car was replaced – and that was spending its life in stop and go traffic.

          Frankly, its great to see Toyota spicing up the driving experience. I gave back a new Prius to fleet because the driving dynamics was so poor. I don’t know why the thought is that those who want economy don’t care about driving….

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          yes, but when the ICE is providing motive power the power-split setup acts as a de facto CVT.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      The CVT used in the Toyota hybrids is completely different from a standard CVT and seems to be of far more robust construction inherent to its design, since it’s based on a planetary gearset like a conventional automatic.

      • 0 avatar
        Jacob

        Having driven Prius a lot, I have to say that I do not have any objections to that particular implementation of CVT. The good thing is that the Prius CVT does not try to “fake” gear shifts. If you stand on the gas pedal, the ICE revs will simply jump to the optimal RPM and will stay there as long as necessary. Not everyone will enjoy driving a car with such drivetrain but its reliability and versatility is now legendary.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheatridger

          I never wanted a CVT either. But as gas engines get quieter and my cars’ transmissions turned into automatics, engine noise and shift action became less evident and essential. Now when I hear the drone of the CVT/gas engine in my Ford C-Max under brisk acceleration, I have just about enough time to register that the droning sound is irritating. A second later, I’m up to highway cruising speed, in near-silence, and the whole CVT vs. a shifty transmission seems irrelevant. The pleasure I used to get listening to a loud engine is being replaced by the pleasure of good audio in a very quiet car.

          My car claims to have active noise cancellation, which seems to help a lot. Does the Camry hybrid offer this feature?

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        @derekson

        Yes, the Prius CVT is more like an electric motor.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      Don’t think of it as a conventional laggy CVT drive train.
      Think of it as a Tesla-like but less powerful, instantly responding electric drive train with the gas motor running in the background.
      The CVT lag is entirely masked by the electric drive.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    PS: And no Android/CarPlay? That’s just stupid in a 2018 model.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Toyota as a manufacturer has wholly shunned adopting these, and is AFAIK the only significant automaker that isn’t using at least one of them, and most support both. I can’t see it doing them any favors with Millenial buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      newenthusiast

      I see this as perfectly acceptable in a base trim. Its far more offensive to leave out and then charge for safety features, in my opinion, than a ‘convenience feature’.

      I think a hybrid model that isn’t ALSO the highest trim is something that not many (if any)have offered before. I used to see the hybrid stacked with all the options by default.

      You can always get them installed later, according to Toyota. And for those that don’t want or need it , they can not have it installed. Why do you dislike consumer choice?

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        You misunderstood. Toyota as a company does not have any implementation of Apple CarPlay or Android Auto. They are suggesting that in a theoretical future where they realize this was a mistake, it could be added via a sorftware update.

        • 0 avatar
          newenthusiast

          I understand what it said. I applaud the move. Its a convenience feature and those that want it in the future (if it becomes available) can pay for it, and those that have no use for it don’t have to worry about it.

          If they did this with something like….DRLs or rear passenger airbags, that would be much more egregious.

    • 0 avatar
      zip89123

      No NAV either.

      • 0 avatar
        jpolicke

        They offer NAV but only as part of the Entune package, so unlike everyone else that charge for the option once and you own it forever, Toyota makes it one more thing you have to buy a subscription for and pay for forever. Of course with no CarPlay or AA you can’t sync with your phone navigation. I like the XLS with the V6 but this is a deal breaker for me.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I don’t understand all the love for CarPlay or Android Auto. They both take way too much attention to operate. CarPlay might be slightly better, but not much. The only good thing with either is the ability to use Google maps through the cars media system. Otherwise, I can do everything better through most manufacturers factory systems. Even the crappy interfaces are better designed for vehicle use than either Android Auto or CarPlay.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        A. you can use whatever Nav app you prefer, or even switch between different ones for different usage
        B. some amount of consistency to the phone interface you use every day already, and consistency from car to car
        C. Ability to use new and updated software constantly since phones are updated infinitely more often than OEM nav systems
        D. better integration with audio streaming software

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    OMG another camry article!
    Bias bias bias! U guyz r sellouts!!! How much did TOYOTA pay u?!

    Oh, wait, its an important all-new model and deserves attention, just like any other important all-new car. Nevermind.

    • 0 avatar
      tinbad

      Yeah, a Camry review with 0 negatives. Hell, it even handles better than a Porsche now!

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I am extremely impressed with the interior, exterior (front end is not that bad, side profile and rear look very nice) and overall efficiency, power and interior materials and gauges of this new Camry.

      Toyota may have a real winner on its hands and may have put a huge swath of distance between this and the Accord (or anything else in this class).

      In fact, this may be the best Camry since the 1992, but better because they are getting very respectable power levels out of the NATURALLY ASPIRATED 4-cylinder (over 200 horsepower with extremely respectable torque and fuel economy is white the engineering accomplishment), and if it handles well without suffering NVH issues, they will have NAILED IT.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      I recognize that rear, side bumper crease that from 300 feet looked like a typical Camry/ES that are often bumper tagged from the lemming drivers who shouldn’t be driving. The NX and 4Runner 1/8 view while parked amongst other cars has caught my eye thing it has been hit.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        These Camrys will be on the roads 10-20 years from now with 200,000 to 320,000 miles on the odometer, long after Chinese-made Buick Envisions and Chinese parts-assembled Buick Encores and other GM absolute sheet are resigned to U-Pick Salvage Yards with 80,000 to maybe 110,000 miles on their Shenzhen-made pedometers.

        If you want an American-made vehicle from American-made parts, buy a Toyota.

        Boycott “One Global Part/Lowest Bidder/If You Can’t Beat Out Cheapest Chinese Sweatshop Supplier Price Don’t Bother Bidding” General Tso Motors.

        • 0 avatar
          gmichaelj

          While I am sure the Camry is a very good car, and may be the leader in it’s segment, due to being a superior product, the profits from buying Japanese branded goods go back to Japan Inc and are spent on the higher priced labor there (engineers and other HQ personnel), as well as distributed out to the shareholders to get spent there.

          I’d like to spend my money here, and I’d like the profits to be spent here.

          • 0 avatar
            Deontologist

            You know that Toyota workers who build cars get paid nearly twice as much per hour versus GM or Ford laborers?

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Buying a US made Toyota (with the 70-80%+ US made content they usually have) is putting Americans to work right here rather than Mexico or (increasingly for GM’s components/assemblies) China and Malaysia. There are decreasingly few “domestic” branded vehicles that pass muster for being assembled in the US with majority-American parts. The previous gen Lambda triplets were a bright exception (80%+ US content), Ford’s F150 was always 75%+ American but has dipped down to 70% with the new aluminum bodied generation. Literally the most American car you can buy in the US is a Camry, with 84% US-sourced components as well as being made in US, this early run of Japanese-made ’18s excepted while they get Lexington switched over.

    • 0 avatar
      Southern Perspective

      Hee hee! I hear you JohnTaurus, but at least the front end styling of the new models doesn´t make one want to approach the car from the sides or rear only for fear of being bitten by a landed sea creature of unspecified origin.

  • avatar
    tinbad

    “We wanted to bring you some of the unique content we think lives up to TTAC’s standards and offers legitimate insight or a properly critical viewpoint to car evaluation.”

    Sorry but there was 0 critical viewpoint in his review. All I learned is the new Camry is amazing and the best car ever. Sure.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Gas tank is 13 gallons; not bad at 50 mpg.
    Moving the battery to under the rear seat is great; it restores the trunk volume. This was a real sore point with me when I was looking at a fusion hybrid ( not the Energi).
    For the urban commuter the range, mileage, size, quiet interior, safety features and “not as offensive as LEXUS” styling have won me over.
    As soon as the subsidized leases begin, sign me up.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      In my humble opinion, buying a midsize car with its base 4-cylinder engine still has the best price-performance over time in most cases unless the car is driven as much as a typical rental/police/taxi car year after year. Hybrids still carry a substantial price premium that is very difficult to justify in the age of sub-3 dollar gas. Having said that, buying any Toyota, hybrid or not, is a very sensible proposition considering the brand’s near-legendary reliability.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        For some of us, Jacob, saving fuel has its own intrinsic value, even if the “economic” case takes a long time to pay back. Leather seats don’t pay for themselves either but for some they are a must. I like when the manufacturer makes various trim/powertrain options available. Choice is good!

    • 0 avatar
      ACCvsBig10

      Does the hybrid highway mpg include the battery being fulled charged before setting off?

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        Battery charge on a Toyota hybrid is constantly in flux. The car strives to maintain a middle charge level rather than fully charged. That way it can fill the battery when descending hills and braking. It functions as part of what is an extremely efficient transmission for the gas motor.
        Your question would be more relevant for plug in hybrids.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The EPA prescribed testing methodology takes into account any difference in the traction battery’s SOC between the beginning and ending of the test.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        ACC, I think you have confused conventional hybrids with plug-in hybrids.

  • avatar
    derekson

    Slipping the Lithium Ion battery out of the upper trims and using the entry-level model as the economy benchmark is a pretty underhanded move, in my opinion. This is the kind of penny wise, pound foolish decision making that has hurt Toyota’s reputation in the past decade or so and that Akio claimed to be abolishing.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      That is nothing new in the Camry the 2017 LE gets a 2 MPG higher combined rating. It is the new loss leader strategy. Get them in the door with high MPG numbers and then tell them that they can’t get the features they want with the model that gets those numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        Sure you would lose SOME efficiency already with added weight, stickier/softer tires, larger wheels, etc but piling on by sticking in a cheaper, heavier battery based on older tech just seems stingy.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          But in the Accord and Fusion the added weight of the upper models have never meant a decrease in the MPG ratings.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          Toyota may feel more comfortable with higher discharge rates from the tried and true NMH pack when packed tightly. Just guessing, but The MPG differences look too big, to be due to a few pounds and some stickier tires only. Suggesting the ECU may be tuned to make the SE more responsive and the XLE more effortlessly waftable, leaving the LE to focus on maximally efficient.

          Regardless, these batteries aren’t big and heavy enough for it to matter all that much. Toyota has enormous real world experience with NMH batteries in the Prius and other hybrids. The Camry isn’t a car normally sold on spec sheet dominance and new-new bling anyway (No Carplay…..). Perhaps the Lexuses using this drivetrain will get a less “old tech” battery.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    It seems like the “Who needs a Prius?” headline on the article begs for more of a comparison with the Prius, especially on pricing.

    I’d still get a Prius, but only because I hate trunks.

  • avatar
    Jason801

    “By itself, the gas engine generates 176 horsepower and produces 163 lb-ft of torque over a wide range from 3,600 to 5,200 rpm. The electric motor makes 188 horsepower and 149 lb-ft, for a total system output of 208 horsepower.”

    Huh?

    “The Camry Hybrid LE has a Prius-beating EPA-rated 53 miles per gallon highway. The city number is impressive too, at 51, with 51 mpg combined.”

    Huh?

    “Sportier SE and luxury XLE models get 44 city, 47 highway, 44 combined.”

    Huh?

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      “By itself, the gas engine generates 176 horsepower and produces 163 lb-ft of torque over a wide range from 3,600 to 5,200 rpm. The electric motor makes 188 horsepower and 149 lb-ft, for a total system output of 208 horsepower.”

      Huh?

      The 176hp is at the top of the engine RPM range. The electric motors produce their power at a different point, usually at a way lower speed. The electric motors also provide transmission function, so they cannot put all their power down while still using the engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      It should say that the electric motorS produce that HP and Torque. As was mentioned their peaks occur at different points so the combined numbers are the max that can be obtained in the right conditions. The other thing is because there are two motors in this type of system one the Range MG can’t really put force to the wheels, it is used to create the transmission ratio and allow the engine to put its power to the wheels or stop when the vehicle is in motion.

    • 0 avatar
      bhtooefr

      Motor/Generator 2, the motor that typically provides power directly to the wheels, does produce peaks of 188 hp and 149 lb-ft.

      Note, however, that there’s another Motor/Generator, and that one acts to control the engine speed, and under full acceleration, any power it pulls off of the engine is sent to Motor/Generator 2, in addition to battery power.

      And, everyone else’s points about the peaks differing also apply – basically, it’s not actually 176 (engine) + 188 (MG2), it’s 176 (engine) + 32 (battery) = 208.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Utility of the hatchback. Camry is extremely nice, still just a sedan. Camry wagon would be a great addition to the Toyota lineup.

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    A hybrid sedan without loss of trunk space?

    Well, that eliminates one of my usual concerns about hybrid sedans. It probably means a smaller fuel tank, but if the writers actual mpg numbers are accurate, then the effective range of the vehicle is still about the same or greater than the non-hybrid version, right?

  • avatar
    gasser

    13 gallons times 50 mpg is over 600 miles.
    The cruising range exceeds my bladder range.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This is a real win to get a midsize sedan with this type of mpgs.

  • avatar
    hirostates12

    “Inside, the interior is a massive improvement in design and materials from the last generation”

    Wow, I certainly did not notice any materials upgrade in the one I tried out. The door panels are just about the cheapest thing I’ve seen in a modern car. The doors make a “ka-flun-ka” noise when shut and the elbow rests are cheap rubber pads that squish flat under moderate pressure.

    Honestly I found the interior on the older model to be no worse, just different. These cars are still depressing transportation pods.

    • 0 avatar
      Delta88

      It looks to me like they are still doing the half-assed, cost cut, faux removable head restraints in the rear seat. They look like they can be removed for added flexibility when folding down the seat but they are just big chunks of foam with upholstery tucked and stitched to make them look separate. Lame.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    Meh… still ugly.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    My 12 Camry Hybrid car has 120K miles without a single repair other than tires and oil changes. No squeaks or rattles at all. And, I really like the angular looks of the 12. Handling really improved when I installed V rated tires. So, it will be many years before I shop for a new Camry. Perhaps another decade.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    The question should not be: “Why buy a Prius instead of the new Camry Hybrid”, but: “Why buy any sedan instead of the Camry Hybrid.”

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      Umm, because you can get a competitor for $10,000 less, and not be subjected to the hideous looks of the Toyota.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Because I could get an Accord with a manual transmission?

    • 0 avatar
      jimmyy

      I have to agree. Being the owner of a 12 Camry Hybrid, I just can’t figure why anyone would purchase anything else. I guess some people want bling to cover a personality disorder …

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @jimmyy..Let me get this straight. You can’t figure out why anyone would purchase anything else. Okay ..I got that. You go on to mention “some people want bling to cover a personality disorder”

        So your the brilliant consumer?.. All those millions of buyers of F 150’s, BMW’s,Audi’s , Mustangs, Camaro’s are all suffering from a personality disorder?

        jimmy…You do know that there just might be some folks here that would disagree with that analysis.

        Or was that your intention ?

        • 0 avatar
          brandloyalty

          You know most vehicle buyers on the planet don’t choose: “F 150’s, BMW’s,Audi’s , Mustangs, Camaro’s”. And yes given the 2016 election, it is possible that many people are deluded.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Would you say you enjoy the smell of your air biscuits?

  • avatar
    zip89123

    How did the NAV work? It doesn’t, because even if a buyer bought a loaded Camry hybrid they still couldn’t get factory NAV from Toyota.

  • avatar
    skotastic

    Sorry, NO WAY it’s fun to drive. Excellent handling, sure, great build quality, ok, amazing technology, yep, comfortable and supportive, yes sir, actually fun? Nope.

    an MGB is ‘fun’ to drive. It’s horrible at everything else, but it’s actually fun. So is a Miata. a 1971 Imperial LeBaron is fun – the floating, spongy, garbage handling is entertaining in 2017, something different that puts a smile (or a mask of terror) on your face.

    There are VERY few new cars that are actually ‘fun’, although there are MANY that are very impressive machines. Let’s just be honest.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Good point. A Triumph Spitfire is fun to drive–with your ass dragging on the ground, blatty exhaust, stubby little short shifter and motorcycle-like protection from the elements, who gives a rat’s ass that it takes 15 seconds to get to 60, it’s fun. A good modern hybrid with brisk acceleration, supple suspension and precise steering is SATISFYING to drive. Still puts a smile on your face, just in a different way.

  • avatar
    djsyndrome

    “Who Needs a Prius?”

    The new Camry Hybrid is a great car, but the $4000 delta between it and the Prius and difference in packaging (not as tall or as much cargo room as the Prius) indicate they are targeting two entirely different types of consumer. Those that want a /Hybrid/, and those that want a “car” that happens to get good gas mileage.

    I would love to see this powertrain and platform support the next Prius v, which currently is an exercise in packaging let down by a driving experience on par with the i-MIEV.

  • avatar
    Delta88

    “Who Needs a Prius?…” Someone who needs hatchback practicality but yet can stand it’s gut-wrenching styling. I’ve gotten over the rear and kind of find it interesting but every other view I find cringe-worthy. The Camry is also way over styled. I think Ford and VW styling is the best even though the cars underneath may not be.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Gotta say, I find the new Prius surprisingly good looking on the road. Scary in pictures, jarring on the lot, but actually handsome from behind the windshield of another car. Certainly won’t be confused for anything else.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Back to recent QOTD – which gen Camry is the best? Obviously – this one

  • avatar
    Greg Locock

    ” We wanted to bring you some of the unique content we think lives up to TTAC’s standards and offers legitimate insight or a properly critical viewpoint to car evaluation. This story, by Hybrid Cars author Evan Williams, showcases the 2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid.”

    Obviously the article with a critical viewpoint accidentally got replaced by a gushy rewrite of the brochure, probably dictated by Toyota marketing. I’d have read a critical comparison. This farrago of an article is a new low.

  • avatar
    brettc

    So 0W-16 is now an oil grade? Okay then. I wonder how long until Walmart stocks it…

    Saw a 2018 Camry on the highway this morning. Looked pretty good overall in black. Nothing I’d ever buy since it lacks a hatch but for the millions that will, seems like it’ll be quite a nice car.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So back to a conversation some of us had a few days ago: What Toyota offers vs what Toyota wants to sell you. Price wise 4 < Hybrid < V6.

    I wonder what the actual % of dealer stock of V6 models will be.

  • avatar
    mchan1

    If I was in the market for a newer vehicle, I’d consider getting a hybrid so it’s nice to know that the Toyota Camry Hybrid is available, for now.

    Then again, as I’m getting older, the CUVs look better and better as it’s slowly becoming a chore getting in/out of a sedan considering how low it sits.
    There are reasons why CUVs sell and getting in/out of them is much easier than any sedan.


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  • Scoutdude: Then you haven’t been watching them. It doesn’t take more than a few pebbles in the road to...
  • brenschluss: Absolutely true. Don’t get me wrong it’s not like it’s not a fun car with a tank of...

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