By on July 6, 2017

10 Generations of Honda Accord - Images: HondaAgainst its normal methodology, Honda is already leaking details regarding the all-new 2018 Accord, the tenth-generation of Honda’s venerable midsize car.

With continued manual transmission availability, a hi-po turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder in place of a V6 upgrade that was part of the lineup for more than two decades, and another generation of coupes, the tenth-generation Honda Accord has the potential to be a terrific car.

But will it be the best Honda Accord?

American-built for 35 years, on the market for four decades, and the most popular car among TTAC’s devoted readership, the Honda Accord is a known entity. But not all Accords were created equal. Judge using whatever methodology you prefer: style, reliability, ride and handling, efficiency, interior quality. Then tell everyone which Honda Accord is the best Honda Accord.

If the collage formation above didn’t already clarify for you my personal answer, it’s the fourth-generation Accord that ran from 1990 through 1993 — a four-model-year run that came before the fifth-gen Accord brought about a V6 option.

(Top row: Gen 1, Gen 2, Gen 3. Second row: Gen 5, Gen 4, Gen 6. Third row: Gen 7, Gen 4, Gen 8. Bottom row: Gen 9, Gen 10.)

To be honest, I’m biased. There was a 1993 Honda Accord, a white EX, in our family fleet when I spent a brief spell growing up in San Antonio, Texas. For pure, obvious, untainted sedan styling — handsome, but never seeking attention — it was difficult to beat the fourth-generation Accord.

Fun to drive, albeit not powerful, the Accord was also built solidly: the doors thunked, the windows slid down smoothly. And while the interior plastics might not measure up in 2017, the seats were comfortable and everything was properly screwed together. The shifter, oh my. Honda knew how to design a proper five-speed manual that made four-cylinder cars feel much quicker than they really were.

2013 Honda Accord group - Image: HondaBut you could make arguments for the other Accords. The first Honda Accord started a trend; the second and third Accords began to take over the market. The fifth Accord installed the aforementioned V6. The sixth combined much of what was good about the fourth and fifth and modernized it. The seventh? The argument gets more challenging with that frumpy and awkward variant. Perhaps you prefer the eighth’s heft or the ninth’s features and safety equipment. Maybe the best Accord is always the next Accord.

But before Honda launches the 2018 Accord later this year, we ought some take time to reflect upon some genuinely impressive vehicles. Which Honda Accord is best?

[Images: Honda]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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137 Comments on “QOTD: Which Honda Accord Is The Best Honda Accord?...”


  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    Generation ranking game:
    3 (pop-up lamps)
    4
    5
    7
    6
    2
    1
    9
    8

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Agree 100%. The 3rd generation was the first that was sized the way that North Americans wanted/liked. It offered colour keyed dashboards to match the excellent cloth seating that was available. It did not rust out like previous Hondas. It had a good ride, and decent noise reduction while still providing handling superior to its D3 competition.

      And it had POP UP headlights! That actually worked.

      One of my business partners had a Gen 2 sedan bought new and treated with kid gloves and I purchased a Gen 3. We both quickly noticed and commented on the overall difference between the 2 was quite noticeable particularly in regard to refinement and interior comfort. We used my Gen 3 whenever possible, particularly when visiting customers.

      Now if someone would fix the d#mn^*d log-in process for this site. I had to try 4 times to log-in and this not the first time that this has happened. It is becoming increasingly frustrating.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Gen 3 was the better car, but Gen 2 was the car that “made” Honda in this country. It was also either the first or one of the first Japanese cars made here (can’t recall if it was the Accord or the Nissan Sentra).

        I’d argue Gen 2 wins on historical significance.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Gen 3 headlights made it mainstream at that time. “And it had POP UP headlights! That actually worked.” – many cars had those back then. But Gen4 is just pure elegance

          • 0 avatar

            And you Yanks did not have the shooting brake-ish Accord that Honda built on the basis of the Gen III, and that was a big success in Europe. I had two of them. Here’s a picture: http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a148/bkcr1/47cb31f5.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Unfortunately far too many manufacturers sold cars with pop up headlights that malfunctioned too often.

            We can speak of British cars where malfunctions were expected. Probably more TR7’s drove around with one headlight up and one down than with 2 actually operating. The same applies to Opel GTs (I actually saw one of the road this weekend).

            However Ford also had an issue with theirs. And Ford produced a great number of vehicles with pop-up or hideaway headlights in the 70’s/early 80’s. Ask any original 7th or 8th generation T-Bird owner about their hideaway headlights.

            Love that Euro 3rd generation shooting brake.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “Gen 3 headlights made it mainstream at that time.”

            Not really – a lot of mainstream cars had hidden or pop-up headlights in the ’70s and ’80s.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @Arthur:
            The pop up headlights on Opel GTs were actually operated by a lever in the cockpit versus an electric motor. You pulled the lever forwards and backwards to flip the headlights.

            In this picture, the lever’s to the left of the shifter.

            http://germancarsforsaleblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/OGT9.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            I’ve got 5 of 10 http://www.classicandperformancecar.com/toyota/celica/5469/cars-with-pop-up-headlights-can-you-name-them-all

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Not sure how you could say pop up headlights weren’t “mainstream,” then…

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            @FreedMike: Thanks for that. It has been so long since I have been in an Opel GT (we called them mini Corvettes) that I had forgotten that.

            But with such a simple, mechanical system, what accounts for the failure? Even in the one that I saw on the road this past weekend which otherwise was in remarkable condition.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I’d think the lever-operated system would be more reliable, but we *are* talking about a car that’s 40-plus years old. Stuff’s gonna break, and parts may not be easy to get. But I’m just theorizing.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            “And you Yanks did not have the shooting brake-ish Accord that Honda built on the basis of the Gen III, and that was a big success in Europe. I had two of them. Here’s a picture: http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a148/bkcr1/47cb31f5.jpg”

            Nope, no AeroDecks for North America, though a few have hopped the pond now that they’re old enough.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            If it’s Aero we’re having, then I’m picking the Soarer AeroCabin.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      9th and it’s turbo-4. :)

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        The 3rd generation was I believe the last of the 3 door hatch Accords. Not sure of the actual sales figures but in the GTA I remember seeing more 2nd generation Accord hatches than sedans.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Gen 3 was also the first Accord coupe. Handsome bugger, too.

        • 0 avatar
          gottacook

          That’s correct – a two-door coupe was introduced alongside the three-door at some point during the third generation’s U.S. production run, and when the fourth generation began (1990 model year) there was no more hatch, just the coupe.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Off the top of my head, 1987 was the year the coupe and hatch were both offered.

          • 0 avatar

            IIRC, the first year for the coupe was 1988, which was also the last year for the hatchback. All coupes were built in Marysville, Ohio (even those destined for sale in Japan) . I believe all the 3-doors were built in Japan. I know the gold ’88 hatchback I had was.

        • 0 avatar
          joeaverage

          I have a 3rd gen hatch that wouldn’t quit. I last saw it with north of 300K miles. Car was comfortable, absolutely reliable, and drive really well.

          When my wife and I started dating, she had a 3rd gen sedan. It was equally reliable though we sold it prematurely. Could have gotten another easy ten years out of it I’m certain. I just had new car fever.

          We eventually bought a 1st gen CR-V off of that Accord’s reputation and were well rewarded.

          I would happily buy another ’87 Accord 5MT LXi hatchback new again or our current ’99 CRV EX AWD 5MT new again.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Yup. Pop up headlights ftw.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      I also learned to drive on a 3rd gen POP UP LAMPS!!!!!!!!

      107 hp took 5 adults and their luggage from the Pacific NW to LA and back up into and over the Canadian Rockies and back home. That’s about the time when I realized I hadn’t changed the oil for over 10,000 miles and it started a burning smell. I changed it right away. That was at about 130k miles.

      I sold the car at 210k miles with no major repair from start of ownership. 6 years later, I see the car delivering pizza. I looked it up on Carfax a few months ago and saw that there were maintenance records dated 2016.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @onyxtape: And thus the Honda legend is born! Numerous similar stories regarding the 3rd Generation Accord, its move up in size, yet its retention of a what was at the time a ‘sophisticated’ handling system (double wishbone) and 4 wheel discs, while retaining a nifty manual transmission allowed Honda to become the sales dynamo that it did.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Corey, you nailed it.

      As a product of the Rust Belt, my exposure to Japanese vehicles was pretty limited in my early car buying years. The 1st gen Accord was regarded as a fun-to-drive tin can. A college friend had a second gen, which was a bit more robust, but still lacked real solidity (and rusted like a mofo). I figured Honda had hit its limit.
      Then I hit the car market, just in time for the tail end of Gen 2. Those things were selling for 2500 over sticker, no test drive allowed. So I went next door to the Chevy dealer and got a 3-door (!) Cavalier for 1700 off sticker. It felt more solid than my pal’s Accord and equally powerful, although it couldn’t match the Honda’s smooth revs nor quality MT. And it lasted 10 years – yes, on the original head gasket – with no issues before I got tired of it.
      Not too long after, I took a trip to Hawaii, and was presented at the airport rental counter with the sort of unicorn one never saw at a mainland lot: a spankin’ new ’86 Accord sedan. This, my friends, was a whole new animal. It was simply better in every way than any car I’d ever been in (and what with traveling most weeks, I’d already driven plenty of late model “competitors”). That’s what made this generation special: it had no negatives and no competition. Plenty of acceleration, comfy cockpit, solid body, stellar handling: it had it all. It absolutely blew everything else out of the water. Since then the changes have been kind of incremental by comparison. Would drive one today if I could stumble across a decent example.
      BTW: have a Gen5 wagon and Gen 6 sedan in the driveway today; recently parted with a Gen7. And in the name of all that is holy, let us please forget the Gen8 ever existed.

  • avatar
    2012JKU

    I had a 96EX-L coupe, a 5th gen. Great car. Miss it. That is back when Honda had a lot of great vehicles. The 4th gen was probably my favorite overall though.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    2006-2007 Accord V6 SEDAN, 6 speed manual.

    Runner up, 1990-1993 Accord, manual transmissions. Runner up because rust.

  • avatar
    spreadsheet monkey

    The best Accord was the 7th gen Euro Accord (or Acura TSX on your side of the Atlantic).

    Right-sized, great engines, nice quality interior.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I had 3 4th gens, but I would say the 5th gen was probably the best. They still had that classically overbuilt Honda feel, crazy simple design, but were a tangible step up in room and refinement from my 4th gens. They also looked incredible modified and had a very strong aftermarket.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      I’m in agreement. My parents had 3rd and 4th gen Accords, and currently own 6th and 9th gen Accords. Good cars all, and I wish my dad hadn’t wrecked the 4th gen one while commuting, because I’d likely be driving it today.

      But, even though we never owned a 5th gen model, I still see these ALL the time, despite the newest ones being 20 years old. Most of them look like they’ve been through the ringer, and are in the hands of shall we say less-than-savory citizens, but keep right on trucking. Most of them even still SOUND good when they drive by. I’ve also personally known three people who took these to ridiculous mileage.

      Full disclosure, my definition of a good car starts with the ability to take abuse and keep moving. I don’t care how pretty it is or how well it handles, if it leaves you stranded and is in the shop all the time it’s not a good car.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The 3rd-gen car. That was when Honda really hit their stride, and, pop-up headlights. Runner-up would be the 1st-gen cars. I was in high school when the Accord launched. People were paying $1500 over sticker (the first one started at $3,499), and I knew guys whose parents were paying cash under the table to get moved up on the waiting list.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      There’s a whole set of books on the corruption that went on in Honda’s dealer network during its early years in the ‘States. It really is fascinating.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Yep. But Honda dealers were able to engage in these shenanigans, particularly in the ’80s, because demand for Hondas was just bonkers. I bought a Civic new in ’85, and it was absolutely miserable – paid over sticker, months-long waiting list, screwed over on my trade, you name it. Worst buying experience of my life, by far. If the demand for Hondas weren’t so ridiculous, none of that would have happened. In the end, though, that speaks for just how good their product was back in the day.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    There’s a short list of great cars that completely “changed the game.” The Gen-2 Accord is on that list. It was the first Japanese family car that had the room and styling to truly compete in the American market, and it was also one of the first Japanese cars built in the U.S. Even in its’ last year, these were on waiting lists, and you couldn’t buy one at sticker if your life depended on it.

    And it was so good to drive that it built a loyal following.

    I believe this was the car that really put Detroit back on its’ heels in the ’80s.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    If I wrote this I’d have titled it: Which Honda Accord has the Most Redeeming Qualities?

  • avatar
    threeer

    Gen 3 and Gen 6 for me. Gen 3 for all that has already been mentioned and that straight, tall glass. I always loved how, while sitting at the wheel, the hood simply fell away from sight (until you turned the lights on). And Gen 6, as my uncle had one topped out and it was just *right* when it came to the balance of luxury and performance).

  • avatar
    make_light

    Not sure about the best, but gen 8 sure was the worst. Big and noisy and cheap inside. Little to offer other than space and reliability, which I guess was enough for many buyers. I have two friends who own them, and each time I go for a ride I’m amazed by how loud and bouncy it feels.

    I rather liked the current gen, especially pre-refresh. It was clean looking, handsome, and tidier than it’s predecessor. Still a little rough around the edges though.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Holy smokes you are correct. I had an 8th gen **literally** no bs for one tank of gas. It was the worst car I have ever spent time in. Parked it, waited for the title from the state and sold it on CL. I broke even on the car so I am not too upset about it.

      • 0 avatar
        guy922

        A friend has a gen 8 LX. She said it wasn’t her cup of tea, especially coming from a Honda family. She said it’s by far the worst, cheaply put together and not terribly refined. I also find it bouncy and loud. I know a few with gen 9’s. They seem much improved.

  • avatar
    hamish42

    I’m not sure how identify them by generation number, but we had a 1981 which was an absolutely terrific car. We kept it for several years, putting a lot of kilometers on it until we had to scrap it because of a huge rust problem. Loved every drive, though.

  • avatar
    bking12762

    I own a 2002 Accord (last year of the 5th gen) purchased pre-owned with 17k for $11,700 in 2005. The car is as close to mint as you will find and has babied since purchased. All K services performed. Heck, I even waxed it on the 4th of July. The car now has 120k and has been literally trouble-free except for the $3100 automatic transmission that plagued many 5th gen accords. (How does a company that made the most beautiful manual transmissions get away with making such a lousy trouble-prone automatic?) Nonetheless, if you pencil it out it still works out to be very cheap driving. The build quality of this gen was superb except for the wind and road noise. We are considering the new Accord coming out soon. I’m prolly crazy for considering trading it in though….

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Honda didn’t make those transmissions. they outsourced them

      • 0 avatar
        tubacity

        False ” Honda didn’t make those transmissions. they outsourced them”

        Outsourcing is not an excuse. Honda is responsible for parts of a Honda, regardless of source.

        As to best and worst. Gen 1 bad. Blown head gaskets common when not very old. Gen 1 automatic trans was 2 speed until 1980. Not enough speeds.

      • 0 avatar
        bking12762

        Therefore I should not fault Honda for the outsourced trans?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          “How does a company that made the most beautiful manual transmissions get away with making such a lousy trouble-prone automatic?”

          You can fault Honda but honda didn’t make them. Besides, best manuals are done by Mazda

          • 0 avatar
            bking12762

            Faultless reasoning. (Tongue firmly implanted in cheek). They didn’t make them therefore they are not responsible……..

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      2002 Would be the sixth gen Accord, Honda made their automatics a bit smoother to address previous complaints of rough shifting, of course smoother = slower transmission fluid delivery, which means more wear and tear. The V6 model simply had a transmission that wasnt up to the task of that engine.

      Honda didnt outsource its transmission design during that time, in fact the majority of their automatics were built and designed in-house.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I think, one pictured in the middle there, ’92 model, was the best. Based on picture below, gen 4… Even today it looks elegant. Timeless design, just like ’92 Legend would be.

  • avatar
    kefkafloyd

    My Accord is best Accord because popup headlights.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    I had a Gen 4 from 91 to 2003. 5-speed, white, coupe. A great car. Enough oomph, good handling, good seats – only strike against it was the motorized shoulder belts.

    Sold it and bought a 2003 LX 4-door, 5-speed (7th gen?). Didn’t like it very much. Brakes clunked/clattered. Dealer couldn’t duplicate the noise. Plus, I very quickly came to HATE the front seats. Kept it for about a year then traded it on a Mazda MPV – family was growing so it worked out ok in the end.

    So – my vote is for the Gen 4 Accord.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I think either the fourth-gen (1990-1993) or the fifth-gen (1994-1997) was probably the best. I owned a fourth-gen, a 1990 EX with the 2.2-liter. Even though that generation of Accord was at the end of its run around the time I was born, I can easily see that it must have been one of the freshest designs in its class at the time, yet it still had that sporty Honda feel. Even now, the fourth-gen is probably the most elegant Accord of all. Plus, glass headlight covers FTW. The fifth-gen built upon that and was the first Accord to offer a V6, allowing it to compete with the Camry on comfort and refinement.

    Fun fact…the fifth-gen V6 units have a slightly different front end, with a longer and taller set of fenders, a longer hood and a longer front bumper for clearance purposes, since the platform was not originally designed to accept a V6.

    The eighth-gen (2008-2012) Accord was definitely the worst…notably downmarket and bloated, both in style and actual size. Plus it spawned the hideous CrossTour liftback. I do think Honda redeemed itself with the current ninth-gen (2013-2017), though.

    Question: has Honda confirmed a coupe for the upcoming tenth-gen (2018 – )? I’d hate for them to kill it off…

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      “I owned a fourth-gen, a 1990 EX with the 2.2-liter. ”

      I had a 1991 EX! The EX got a power bump for the DX and LX models, from 125HP to 140HP. It was classic Honda, with a big green house and a sporty feel.

      I’ve also heard vague rumors that the Honda Accord Coupe will go away but be replaced by another coupe called the Prelude.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        We’ll see what happens a week from tomorrow as far as the Coupe — Honda is doing a static reveal in Detroit at 11am. (Obviously, they dropped the other shoe a month ago when they dis-embargoed the little long-lead preview drive in Japan, and with it, disclosed that the V6 was indeed dead, and in fact, had been from the beginning of the development cycle. (I’ll have speculation about that in a later response on this thread.)

        Who knows about a Prelude redux — we’ll have to see. I suppose a 2.0T tuned to Civic Type-R specs would be good, but the question is how they’d market it, i.e., same “level” as the equivalent Accord Sedan, flagship-spec, as with previous ‘Ludes, or in-between. (If the interior is identical to the Accord, nice try, but…!)

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    For me, 2nd generation will always have a soft spot in my heart. I actually started out driving on a 1983 Accord sedan. I admit, going back to an Accord after 20 years would not be the dumbest idea I have ever had.

  • avatar
    brettc

    My parents had a 1994 Accord DX that I drove a lot while I was in high school, so I remember that generation fondly. Not a ton of power, but it was a really nice car for 1994 compared to what GM was selling at the time.

    I still stare when I see a 90s Accord that’s in decent shape, especially if it’s a wagon. The 1989-1993 cars were really nicely designed.

  • avatar
    loguesmith

    I had two Accords (three if you count the one my ex got in the divorce).

    First was an ’85 LX hatch. 5-speed and a whopping 86HP. Took that car on a 3 week road trip from CA to MI and back. Really, really liked it, and traded it in when the family grew from two to three.

    Second was a ’93 DX sedan. Also a stick shift, I got it after marriage #1 ended and I relocated to CO. No A/C, no power anything – heck, it only had a two speaker stereo. Only put 55,000 miles on it in over 5 years of ownership. Great car, despite the lack of creature comforts.

    (FWIW, the third was a ’92 LX sedan, which we got after the wife totaled her Mazda Protégé. Blue over blue, with an automatic. Purchased as a ‘one only at this price’ ad car. Ex kept it for 7-8 years, IIRC)

    I’ll go with gen 4, only because we had two of them. Did have a chance to drive a gen 3 LX-I that was owned by a co-worker, and test drove an ’03 V6 sedan when I was in the market at the time.

  • avatar
    ajla

    The only Accord I ever cared about was the 7th gen (2003-2007) V6 coupes.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I worked at a transmission shop in the summer of ’98. And based what I saw, the 4th gens didn’t last. I mean, we had so many come into the shop that barely made it to 180k miles on what was clearly the original trans fluid.

    Reputation for reliability, huh?

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Generation II was the most influential on the overall marketplace. 1984 Accord. First year it was built in USA I believe.
    Third generation was the very best when compared to competitors. Fantastic appliance and it was still Japanese vehicle even though it was built in USA.
    Fourth generation it became much larger and became “Americanized”.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Third-Gen, despite the crappy carburators and being a risk in a crash, it was one of the few bold Accords (well and the Acura Vigor).

    Owned a fourth gen and a fifth gen, I liked the interiors but never did like working under the hood. They had nasty rear wheel well rust too thanks to Midwest salt and a poor design that practically pockets the salt. They do drive well in good shape I’ll admit.

    The sixth gen I’m mixed on, its clear where Honda improved yet the dash jutts into my knees, the car itself felt like a softened up fifth gen (in a bad way). Auto transmissions sucked too. I can see why Honda guys might not like them.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    The third generation was about when I discovered Honda and the resemblance to the Prelude didn’t hurt. The third generation also debuted the coupe (which ultimately spelled doom for the aforementioned Prelude). I owned a fifth generation ’97 SE (auto) and a ‘01.5 EX (5-speed) and appreciate to this day what makes a Honda unique.

  • avatar
    brawnychicken333

    The 4th generation with a manual was an incredibly pleasing car. Really hard to beat. Though I love the first generation-and Honda’s of that vintage in general-almost as much.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    I just got a 17 hybrid – unbelievable car with power and 50 mpg. Turned in a 2012 with 90k on the clock that had NEVER been to a mechanic. Absolutely nothing ever went wrong with it. Smoking deal on the hybrid too, I guess I can credit that to the sedan deathwatch, $2 gas and gen 10.
    I also had a gen 7 and a gen 8. Perfectly fine cars, but this last year of gen 9 has made great strides in road noise.

  • avatar
    rileyru

    I vote for 7th.

    My 4th gen was the least reliable machine I’ve ever owned. 1990 EX 2.2L 140hp, purchased in 1998 from original owner (middle aged professor) with 95k miles and service receipts. Literally broke on the way home (distributer). I will always remember the dark red interior. Drove it about three years or 40k miles, during which time it failed to start on several occasions and actually gave up mid-journey and left me by the side of the road twice. After replacing the distributer, the computer, alternator, starter, solenoid, and ignition switch all needed to be replaced due to no-starts or total breakdowns. Dealer wanted to replace clogged intake manifold, but had local independent import guy clean it instead (was still very expensive).

    In 2007 I bought a brand new 7th generation which was fantastic, drove it 50k miles with ZERO issues of any kind. The 2.4L 166hp engine felt much stronger (probably due to the car still being relatively light weight) and the MPGs averaged high 20’s in the city and mid 30’s on the highway. Sold it to an acquaintance who put another 100k on it and also had NO issues outside of normal maintenance.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      The distributor is a weak point of Accords during that time, did you have most of the work dealer done or independent?

      • 0 avatar
        rileyru

        Mostly the dealer since it always seemed to break down close them…

        Prior to the Honda I had a 1988 Cherokee with 200k, after the Honda I had a Mazda 626 with 100k, both were unbelievably more reliable!

  • avatar
    gasser

    I’ve owned ’80, ’03 and ’05 Accords.
    Family has owned, and I’ve driven, ’84, ’87,
    ’92, ’94 and ’08.
    To me the best was 2003 EX. The engine hp bumped up to 160 across all trims and the auto trans went to 5 speeds.
    GREAT visibility, excellent acceleration, good air conditioning. 90k miles with only a broken sun roof switch (warranty) and an A/C compressor ($800).

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    My criteria for every Honda’s new model is whether it is as much of a break-through as the Gen 3 Accord was.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    In the 90s –

    I had a higher – 150k? – mileage ’86 Accord LXi hatchback that was a nice car – at first. Then it broke the clutch cable, would stall after going over a puddle, and the brakes – even after two visits to the mechanic – were terrible at stopping the car.

    Still buying into the “Honda best cars evar” myth – an ’87 DX hatch that was uh – falling apart in the interior. The door chime turned itself on randomly. Gutless with the carb and not a fun car to drive even with the stick shift. Was happy to trade it in on a ’94 Nissan truck.

    Both had problems with rust around the gas door.

    And later – sucker that I am – a 90k mile 2001 Accord Coupe with the V6 and the worst automatic I’ve ever dealt with. It was a sluggish shifter, feeling more like something from the 1970s. Cramped and dark interior, also the V6 felt like it had all the power of a 4-cyl. Replaced by a 2004 BMW 325i which was a major step up in power (that lovely inline-6!), handling, and interior quality/room.

    That, along with a troublesome Element, and I’ve sworn off the Honda brand.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      What happened with the Element?

      Someone I know wants one, it’d be handy to know what issues could arise.

      • 0 avatar
        dividebytube

        Problem cropped up at ~68k miles. I never got a straight answer from the mechanic – but at highway speeds, something started making a horrible and very loud grinding noise. It sounded like the wheels were going to come off, like metal on metal.

        The mechanic was able to duplicate it on the road, but never on the rollers. He did a “fix” which did nothing. And so I ended up trading it to a Honda dealership after telling them the issue. They were happy to take it since Elements are apparently always in demand. I imagine they were able to sort out the problem quickly since they had a lot more experience with the car.

        I suppose I could have had them repair it, but this particular Element was an EX with no ABS, no cruise control!, and no arm rests. Those lack of features became annoying with time (and something I didn’t notice during the test drive). Also a very choppy ride on the highway but I do sort of miss it for the pure utilitarian hauling.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          Sounds like either wheel bearings, a hub, or tires, I dont blame yah for trading it in though.

          Are you sure it wasnt a DX? I would think the EX would at least have arm rests (let alone cruise and ABS).

          • 0 avatar
            joeaverage

            The EX CRV of that era had ABS and cruise. The armrests were a dealer (or DIY) installed accessory. Pretty easy too – just puncture the seat cover where the threaded hole was located on the side of the seat and thread in the armrest.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    So far, 9th gen. Why? NVH. The Accords of yore were plagued for the longest time by noise. Wind noise, road noise, tire noise, were just part of the Accord experience. The newest (available) iteration is quiet.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    2nd and 3rd generations are dear to my heart because of my youthful nostalgia, and the cars were so good for the time. However my parents had a 6 gen and I think it still had the special something of earlier Hondas. Low cowl, great visibility, certain lightness of touch, great handling. They bought it at the end of the run because they saw the 7 gen and didn’t like it. They traded it for an Outback, which I loath, and I wish I had bought the Accord from them but it just wasn’t good timing.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Can I pick the 5th-gen JDM Accord SiR, with the VTEC H22 from the Prelude? All things considered, I’d rather swap the H22 into a widebody Ascot Innova.

  • avatar
    Marko

    7th-generation (biased, since I drive a third-generation TL). The ninth, current generation is excellent in its own right, and it’s Honda’s first hybrid that isn’t cramped, buggy, or confused about its mission.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Just want to come out in defense of a particular 8th gen; the pre-refresh ’08-’10 coupe model. The post refresh one got bulbous taillights and lost its sharp lines on the front, but pre-refresh was almost a perfect design. Big hints of 1st-gen Mercedes CLS in the rear, a well-chiseled front, and every line down the side ties them together without fuss or unnecessary cues. We have an ’09 EX-L V6 in Belize blue pearl and that has to be the best color for them. I wish the interior were more “coupe-y” versus the sedan, but it’s still nice and drives like the post-RSX coupe Acura never made.

    The 8th sedan, on the other hand, with its insectoid bulging headlight eyes, you can keep at the bottom.

  • avatar
    SteveMar

    6th Generation from 1998-2002 were probably the pinnacle of Honda quality and engineering. My folks had a 1999 version that was solid, performed well and rock solid reliable. And with enough safety equipment to qualify as a modern car. Also with styling that has stood the test of time. Tons of these cars are still on the road.

    4th Generation had most of these virtues but suffered from more rust, annoying passive restraints and lack of safety equipment. But they looked great at the time.

    2nd Generation was the car that really put Accord on the radar. The ones truly built for the US market. They looked fresh in 1982 and still do today.

    3rd Generation – because of the pop up lights, better handling and structure and fuel injection.

    1st Generation because, well, they were awesome at a time most American cars were not. Showed Honda could make something more than tiny subcompacts.

    After that, I guess I would go Gen 9, Gen 5, Gen 7 then Gen 8.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “6th Generation from 1998-2002 were probably the pinnacle of Honda quality and engineering. ”

      No I’d argue they started to use more and more domestically sourced suppliers, with some mixed results. These were also the years when transmission issues started to crop up as weight and power finally reached levels that the Honda’s style of automatic started to have issues. I’d put the 6th gen as the beginning of full “Americanization” of the Accord for better or for worse. It was definitely more refined and roomier and more comfortable and more powerful than ever before (200hp J30 V6 put it in the running against the 1MZ Camry and VQ30 Maxima).

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        I agree, the 98-02 was an era of marked de-contenting from the prior version. Definitely a step down in that respect.

        • 0 avatar
          johnds

          Depends on the model. I had a 98 Lx I4, and a 99 Exl V6.

          The 1998 Lx added vtec that wasn’t standard before on the Lx. Many of the parts like alternator were Denso and many more. It was typical of Honda to decontent base models taking away things like seat back pockets, drum brakes, etc. Compared to our 94 and 97 Accord though standard vtec, keyless entry, chip key (theft prevention), 100 times better rust control. Just sold it to a teenager with 192,000 miles.

          99 Accord exl v6. Sold with 253,000 miles. This car had more features than any other accord I had ever driven before. We didn’t have transmission issues because we took care of it. Noticeably American parts was the Delphi (GM) alternator that needed replacement at 125,000 miles. I guess they cheapened out with the GM part but American jobs were benefited.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            To be fair Honda’s have had Denso alternators crap at not-that-high of mileages too so I wouldn’t entirely be down on AC Delco in that case.

          • 0 avatar
            joeaverage

            I can’t imagine why any car isn’t sold with seat pockets across the line. We have a older domestic sedan without them and it is comical what that car cost new (alot for its time) and it doesn’t have a place for rear seat occupants to put their travel things.

            The smaller the car the more important those pockets are.

    • 0 avatar
      mechaman

      I see at least 4-6 6th gens daily.

  • avatar

    I had a gen 6 (1999, stick). Probably my favorite car that I’ve owned. It was an excellent combo of looks (classical sedan) and fun to drive. The last car I owned before most cars had slit windows, which I loath, both stylistically and because they’re so hard to see out of. Bought used for $5,500 in Nov 04 with 67k. Drove really nicely, but after around 150k, I began having to put a fair amount of money into it. Drove it until end of ’11, with 200k.

  • avatar
    volvo

    I vote for late 7th Gen (2006-2007) V6. Looked good, V6/transmission problems seemed to have been worked out.

    The V6 sedan and coupe had tight suspension, decent brakes and more than adequate power.

    However the 2007 was well behind Toyota and Nissan in the electronics department. No MP3, No Bluetooth, very expensive Nav package available only on top of the line model.

  • avatar

    I’d have to say 3rd-gen. I had an ’88 DX hatchback, Laguna Gold Metallic, purchased in my senior year of high school and driven until my senior year of college. It was such a great car. Not fast, the carb’d 2.0 12-valve made all of 98 HP, but at least it was a manual.

    One of my younger brothers had two 4th gens, and another had an ’89 sedan for awhile.

    I haven’t experienced anything quite like the driving position of a 3rd generation Accord. That low cowl just made you fell like you could see everything.

  • avatar
    rhduff

    Current Gen 9 is the best. Well built, reliable, smooth engine, clutch, and gearbox, just enough tech stuff. I’m prolly biased since I own a Crystal Black Pearl EX coupe. I was too cheap to spring for the V6 and now regret it. I don’t regret having cloth instead of the crummy leather Honda uses.
    Next fave is Gen 3. LOVE the headlights.
    Gen 1 is next. Had a friend in college who had a maroon LX hatch. I honed my clutch/gearbox skills on it. That car took many years of abuse, yet only was put out to pasture because of rust.
    Gen 2 is next favorite. It was my first car, bought new in 1982. I kept it for about 100K then got an 87 Prelude
    Gen 4 is the next best. Great size, fantastic refinement, but dull as dishwater to look at.
    Gen 6 comes next. I had a EX-L V6 coupe. Fantastic engine, but man, was that tranny a pos. I kept it for 12 years, and got rid of it for my Gen 9 because the tranny had been slipping, and I really wanted a stick. I had motor mounts replaced at least four times on this one. One day, in the middle of summer, the temp gauge went almost all the way to H. Got it to the dealership since it was still warranted and the radiator was empty. They refilled it, and never had a prob with the engine after that. I miss that creamy smooth 6, but not the crappy trans.
    Gen 5 is next. I forgot all about, honestly since it wasn’t that memorable.
    Last, and least is Gen 8. Ugly, bloated, yuck. Never liked this one, except the coupe in Belize Blue or San Marino Red.

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    I remember when my girlfriend-now-wife was looking to trade her ’04 325i for something else back in ’09. The Accord was near the top of her list. I was pretty impressed with it but for some reason she went with an ’09 Jetta.

    I think the pre-refresh (non Acura beak) Accord currently produced is OK. That again was on her list when she replaced the Jetta last year, but was crossed off in short order when she realized she wanted AWD and more cargo space that a sedan could not offer.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Gen 4 based on all around build quality, durability, form factor, and how they drive. Very sturdy cars and while yes the rear quarter panels can get quite rotten, nothing really gets structurally rusty until much later.

    Gen 3 for aesthetics and pure Japanese-ness. Make mine an LXi hatchback (fuel injected A20 motor) with a 5spd and maroon interior.

    Have not so much as ridden in a ’13+ car unfortunately.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Gen 4 was a world class car. Outstanding in every way. It was all down hill from there.

  • avatar

    4. Engaging, fun to drive and overbuilt.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Had a 4th gen and spent enough time with the subsequent models to have opinions on them. I don’t get the love.

    4th. Screwed together like a million bucks in a time when almost nothing else was. 2700 lbs and seat bottoms in the floor pan made it a hoot for a 20 minute test drive and a backache to actually live with. Slow, cramped and noisy. Rusted. You could have had a million mile Camry that was actually comfortable instead.

    5th. Still screwed together really well. Marginally more space but still sitting in the floor pan, still slow and noisy. Still could have had a Camry.

    6th. Getting there. 2″ taller than the 5th – which was itself 2″ taller than the 4th. V6 strong enough to be worth the trouble and nobody knew that they ate transmissions yet. But still noisy and unrefined and the Jap reliability chasm was only an edge by now.

    7th. There. A reasonably refined, well built car. Which you could by now have from almost anyone.

    8th. Ditto, and anyone has now expanded to even include VW and the Koreans.

    9th. Does it matter? Sedans are for contrarians and poor people and most of them are going for the compacts.

  • avatar
    caconwayus

    I just picked up a Gen 4 1993 EX sedan…just turned 85,000 miles…little old man car…came with all maintenance records.

    Drives beautifully and love the interior…well laid out and well put together…high quality materials…they don’t make em like this anymore!

  • avatar
    johnds

    I’ve driven almost all generations except 1 and 2. I currently have a 7 and 7.5.

    94 accord lx 5speed. Sold with 258k. Neat car but rust was a big issue in Minnesota. Replaced slave cylinder.

    96 Accord lx auto. Sisters car. 140k when bought 10 years ago. Cam seal fell out and leaked all oil out. We had engine seals replaced. Still being driven in the family and nearing 200k.

    97 Accord lx. Sisters. Nice handling but not luxurious. Totaled in a t bone crash at 117k. Not the safest car as it was crushed like a can.

    98 Accord lx. Vtec auto. Pretty reliable..sold with 192k on original trans.

    99 exl v6. Reliable, fast. Alternator replaced once at 125k. Needed egr port cleaned. Lasted reliably until 253k when traded.

    03 accord v6. Been a decent car. Needed a/c replacement at 100k. Alternator went out at 247k. Axel shaft broke at 246k. Just recently had to replace the transmission at 261,000 miles. Still runs great.

    07 Accord 5 speed manual. 184k. Best accord I’ve ever owned, best car period. I have only replaced a wheel bearing and a.c. compressor. Rust control is much better than the older accords, especially generation 1,2,3,4,5.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    My fave is the 4th.

    The 5th was nice enough, but I could tell things were a little less nice than the 1990-1993s preceding it.

    When getting in my Dad’s brand-new 1994 EX Sedan for the first time, it immediately hit me that the floormats weren’t as thick as the ones in the 1991 he had just turned in. And despite the addition of VTEC (or maybe because of it), the engine didn’t sound as..well..EAGER as the last one. (It still had more snort than the 1991..145hp vs. 125 or 130 in the 1991 EXs, which may have bumped-up to 140 in the 1993 SEs, but I’m not certain, and I’m too lazy to Google it.) But SOMETHING about it just didn’t feel as right..as “all of a piece!”

    Ranking them from the 4th-Gen to present day, my list would be:

    4
    9
    7
    5
    6
    8

    Here’s the “TL;DR!” Grab a sammich!

    The 6th was OK, but there was just nothing special about it! (Plus, that was the generation with frangible transmissions (of which my 2000 EXL-V6 was one), and which had the incandescent backlights on the LCD instrument-panel displays which failed prematurely; of course, the failure of the stereo displays in the 7th-Gen was also widespread and common.) EGR failures also plagued the 6th. Have seen a couple mentions on here about the classic low cowl, which was still there in this gen., but was still there to a lesser degree in the 7th. (First generation designed with a V6 in mind from the outset; was getting a little tired of the increasing number of rattles in my then-current 1994 Civic EX Sedan, and when I had a chance to hoon my Dad’s 1999 V6 Sedan–underestimating my speed by some 30mph at full-throttle–** 110 ** vs. 80, I was sold, and that 2000 graced my garage soon after that drive!) This generation taught me that with the proper equipment, one could actually drive without constantly fiddling with climate controls (had automatic climate-control for the first time), and that it was nice not having a garage-door remote flying about the interior (first HomeLink-equipped car).

    The 8th-Gen (2008-2012) was the last Accord with the famous double-wishbone suspension up-front, but IMHO, that was also the nadir of the Accord, as it was too big and bulky to take advantage of the better handling accorded (sorry! ;-) ) by the setup, even as it also was the last with hydraulically-assisted steering. The overall quality was dismal, especially inside the car, and the VCM on the automatic V6s, at least prior to the mid-cycle model change (MMC) in 2011, was trouble-prone. (There were also any number of problems with brakes, rattles and leaks during the first two model-years.) The VCM also took away the variable-exhaust VTEC on the V6 engines — it wasn’t until the 9th-Gen (last with the V6, sadly :-( ) that Honda simplified the VCM to only drop one bank of three cylinders, instead of 2-3-4 (I think) on the 8th, allowing 9th-Gen drivers to have their cake and eat it too. Post-MMC, Honda’s cost-cutting got ridiculous on this one — my Dad’s 2011 Accord has no ambient LED light above the center console like the 7th-Gens, and 2008-2010 Accords did, but there’s a DIMPLE in the plastic in the overhead console where the thing would have been placed; that’s also when glovebox lights left the Accord, never to return. By the MMC, most problems had been sorted, but IMHO, the thing was still too big, and too chintzy feeling! The dash, for example, was almost a perfect riff on the 3rd-Gen, but then the sea of buttons on the center stack let it down! (And caused Honda to go the other way on the 9th-Gen with the setup now universally reviled by the various car rags (and helping to earn the higher-end models a big dark circle in Consumer Reports), the touch-screen infotainment unit! I’ve got no problem with the layout per se; the Bluetooth pairing is easy-peasy compared to the horrible procedure on the 2008-2012s, but the YUUUUUUGE problem is that half the system is lawyered-out at faster than a walking pace, meaning that the only way to perform certain functions is to attempt to work through the dog’s breakfast of what is supposed to be voice-recognition!!! I still can’t tell that system to display the trip computer and not have it tune the radio to 900 AM instead! I’ve literally panic-stopped to a dead halt (when I could), complete with ABS a-chattering, to select the *** SINGLE *** phone number for a contact, instead of trying to go through the voice prompt mess! Yes, friends, the system won’t let me select a SINGLETON item on a screen without the car being stopped! (I understand the Garmin-based nav systems in the newer Hondas have improved upon this! Then again, the original Ford MyTouch would have been a usability improvement over this! The responsiveness is good, the system doesn’t reboot three times in a two-mile drive, but some of the “nannyness” is infuriating, and the voice-command piece didn’t improve over two generations of Accords!)

    The 7th was a good step forward from the 6th; not as much as from the 8th to 9th. Post-MMC, the wheels got bigger, but I suspect Honda didn’t do their homework on spring rates, as the Michelin MXV4s were a little harsh on my 2006 EXL-V6 NAVI(gation). (The MXXMs with which I replaced them were a little better, but the ride was still a little harsh.) This was the best-handling of the V6s; the 5th-Gen (all fours, until the first V6 in 1994 or 5, which required a longer fender to accommodate it–gold star to Kyree, I think) was just ever so slightly less sprightly than it’s forbear. This was the first generation with more modern safety nannies (traction-control/stability-assist), side-curtain airbags, available navigation, and XM radio, so a 2007 in good condition starts to look like a great candidate for a new driver!

    The 9th is my pick for second-place (and only just) because despite being newer, chock full of technology, and having better overall performance, Honda’s cost-cutting still made for an interior that was a half-step short of an Acura, but still has plastic that FEELS as if it will scratch if you look at it funny; the carpet is off the bargain felt rack at Michael’s (making a Husky/WeatherTech floor-liner-type deal a necessity, or at least a nice set of Honda All-Season floormats where salt and slush aren’t common, a must-have), and the standard floormats will be worn-through on the driver’s side inside 5,000 miles! Otherwise, this generation has it all: fairly decent handling, in spite of the MacStruts and electric power-steering, and in V6 guise, will blast off like an F-18 off a catapult (as Jack will attest), yet with the VCM running half the cylinders at the Adaptive Cruise Vmax of 90mph, will hit the low 30s with three people aboard, trunk full of luggage, and the A/C turning the cabin into a meat locker! I had a Hybrid of this generation, a 2017 EX-L, to drive for a week while my Honda dealer was checking out a “one-off” horn problem, and it’s not just for greenie-weenies; it does have a few weird driveability quirks which will hopefully be fully-rectified when the 10th-Gen bows this fall. (The second-half of MY 2013 was also when Honda joined the chorus of automakers pinching pennies by removing the dark-tinted “brow” from the windshields! Nice for radar-detector reception, bad for visibility, as you have to be ready to grab your sunglasses any time you turn towards the sun, instead of having a couple seconds before you go blind! This was always a “step-up” from a Civic, which didn’t have that “brow.” I was fortunate to get my 2013 before they dropped this, as I’ve already had a windshield replaced–the glass is thinner overall, either for savings of weight or cost.) Two other things that Honda finally addressed in this generation were road noise, and weak-sauce brakes; I don’t know if I’d track mine without some updates, but these binders will take a couple more good hard stops than past generations without fading into an ineffective, smoldering mess!

    But that 4th-Gen was a “grown up” CR-X in feel, quality (absolutely not ONE interior rattle in 80,000-some miles in my Dad’s 1991 Accord EX, in all its awesome Hampshire Green Pearl glory), and execution! Thick carpet, beefy cloth seats, thoughtful touches everywhere! Yes, the mouse-belts pre-MMC (1990-1991) SUCKED, and Honda still hadn’t ironed-out corrosion-resistance by this time (and wouldn’t, IMHO, until the 6th-Gen debuted); ignition components were also on the weak side at this time across Honda’s lineup. But this car was an honest 3-Series contender at a time when BMW still made..BEEMERS! That little F22 could probably run at low Autobahn speeds all day without breaking a sweat, and made the sweetest sounds while either doing that, or when you planted your foot into that floormat, which felt like Wilton wool compared to the dreck that Honda puts in now, as I stated above! This is still the benchmark for which Honda should still strive!

    So what of the Accord now? Obviously, the BIG shoe dropped back in June, when this company which was well-known for designing engines around cars, let it be known that it was following the rest of the lemmings, and going to what I would argue is an inferior powertrain solution of a turbocharged four-pot on the upper trims, and in fact, ALL turbocharged engines on the non-Hybrid models, which means that Ma and Pa Kettle are going to have to keep up on oil changes in their beige LX, or have the turbo sludge-apart at 60,000 miles! As I opined at some point in the news article comments on here about this, the BASE ENGINES (without the gerbil-wheel and associated plumbing, etc.) are now SMALLER than in the Accords of 1990 (with the base L15 turbo being the same size as the engine of the base 1990 *** CIVIC *** Hatchback, with the 2.0T smaller than the 2.2-liter engines of the 1990 Accord)! This kick to the gut was made worse by the fact that:

    1. It was revealed that the V6 option was going away from the START of development on this 10th-Generation Accord, and even worse for Hondaphiles..
    2. ..the very day before, Toyota announced that not only was the Camry going to keep the V6 (and a naturally-aspirated four, both with part-time port-injection to stave-off a walnut-shell enema after 80,000 miles), but that both engines were more powerful, with the V6 cracking a perfect bowling score of glue-factory candidates! (Both on premium unleaded, likely, but nevertheless, 285+hp..in a CAMRY???!!! I don’t think Honda can go much above 270hp and expect anything resembling durability.)

    So yes, Honda ceded a nice chunk of the market here!! That 10-15% of buyers who choose the V6 are a loyal bunch that you pi$$-off at your peril! One of the salesguys at my Honda dealer found this out the hard way on the day Honda dropped this news: as he was digesting the news, a young couple wandered into his cubicle to take delivery of their new Fit, and as he was reaching for the phone to check on the car, it rang, and on the other end was a long-time Accord V6 lease customer (I think it was six or seven cars going back to 1997 or so, from the salesguy’s E-Mail) who declared that Honda had lost his business for good over their decision, and who just continued to “lose his $hit” loud enough for the poor couple to hear, such that the poor salesman just hung up on the idiot! (Not that I wasn’t as angry as that clown! However, I’m at least going to test-drive the new one before I pass final judgment, as with 25+ years of Honda ownership under my belt, any other make, IMHO, is going to be a compromise. More on this in a bit!)

    Two things killed the V6 in the Accord, IMHO:

    1. First and most obvious is the political climate! Not to start a political flame-war, or belabor this subject beyond what has been done amongst the B&B to this point, but when the argument is made that the product of aerobic respiration is a POLLUTANT, and specious arguments are made about other facets of these principles that only tighten the regulatory noose around the automakers, obviously, sane solutions are going out the window! (Well, they might be making a little bit of a comeback in the form of smoother straight-sixes, but it’s too late for the Accord! Even if Honda is using the V6 as a “luxury-only” argument, it isn’t enough to keep Acura afloat!)

    2. The icing on the green cake, at least in the U.S., is CAFE 2025. Unfortunately for Honda, they only had half-baked alternative-propulsion solutions that weren’t worth spit, until the drivetrain in the latest Accord Hybrid came about! With the give-and-take in the current, flawed system, Toyota had some wiggle room with the various forms of Prii, along with the host of others, which Honda apparently didn’t!

    In short, then, Honda is going to have to swing for the fences and knock the ball into the next AREA CODE if they want to succeed with this Accord! The day after the news broke, as I was reading the hue and cry on vtec.net over this, it occurred to me that the loss of weapons-grade torque might not be so bad if Honda can both up the quality of the interior fitments a bit, and recapture the ESSENCE of the Accord! Kinda like what was present in..

    ..the 4th-Gen!! (One-hundred ten responses or so, and that seems to be the favorite!)

    If they can get the ZING of the old four-bangers, with a little snort down-under, enough to not be a laggy mess that has to be driven with the foot on the floor just to keep up with traffic (while getting 22mpg), that’ll be half of it! (Along with good Honda reliability — as with the 9th-Gen Accord, the Civic’s low marks in Consumer Reports are infotainment-related, both from UX and general bugs — but the engines seem to be holding up OK. The drive is good, too, though with some lag present. As I said above, I can’t see Honda going much above what the current V6 puts out with the 2.0T, and expect that engine to be able to move a heavier car for as long without reliability concerns; I think a Civic Type-R-tuned engine would still be worn out by 125,000 miles, where today’s V6 is just nicely broken-in by that point!) With the lighter engines SHOULD come the athleticism which graced the 4th-Gen, too, if Honda’s done their job!

    And the other half they’ve gotta nail is the interior! Nice surfaces that don’t scratch when the sun hits it, halfway decent feel to areas most touched, a nice upscale place that’s a step above Civic-grade execution, as Accords have always been. (With maybe the exception of the 2008-2012s, until Honda TRULY lost the plot and hit bottom with the 9th-Gen Civic in 2012!)

    If they can do that, in spite of my reservation toward turbo-fours, I’ll give the next Accord an honest look, since again, ANYTHING ELSE is a compromise! (For one, the Camry doesn’t come with certain options which are almost standard across the midsize class in the upper trims, like memory seats and factory remote-start, at ANY price! And for what they’re asking for an upcharge on the V6, they should have included stuff like that!!)

    However, if Honda loses the plot on this thing, and brings out a venti-sized Civic (with which the Accord shares a platform), they’ll be in a world of hurt! (And they’ll have left me! If that’s the case, I just might drive the wheels off my 2013 Touring!)

    After the decision to drop a CR-V engine tuned to run on premium fuel into the Civic Si (instead of a detuned Type-R engine), the Acura ILX, the Acura ZDX, Honda CrossTurd, and all the other questionable decisions Honda’s made recently, I give them a 50-50 shot at nailing this one!

    We’ll find out more a week from tomorrow, when Honda formally unveils the Accord in Detroit. Cautiously optimistic.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “The 5th was nice enough, but I could tell things were a little less nice than the 1990-1993s preceding it.”

      I get the same feeling. 5th gen was a really nice car, but it was starting to lose some of that “special sauce” that early 90s Hondas (and 80s ones) seemed to have.

  • avatar
    KOKing

    CB Accord Best Accord.
    OK, the F motors tended to burn oil over time, the ATs shifted hard and had that distinctive whine, and the early ones with the better taillights had stupid mouse track seatbelts. But if you wanted a then-discontinued 1st gen Legend, you were getting 85%+ of that in a CB.

  • avatar
    JNP

    I had a 2nd generation ’82 5sp LX hatchback and ’89 3rd gen 5sp LXi sedan. FYI, the 2 speed automatic was used up through 1982 with the 4 speed coming out in ’83. I loved them both and drove them just under 200k miles each. The 89 was clearly more refined. My uncle, who was a sworn BMW driver, had an 89 LXi also and he said it was the best built car he ever owned!
    Both my uncle and I had repeated failures of front ball joints in our ’89 LXis, which was the ONLY problem I ever had with either of mine.
    I was never too wild about the styling of the 5th generation – they looked small and cheap to me, both in and out. I really can’t comment about the other generations, but it sure looks like Mercedes copied the 8th generation coupe for the c-class coupes.
    And, I agree that it is disappointing to think the Accord spawned the Crosstour.
    If I was to get another sedan an Accord would be it. But for now, my wife won’t let me get rid of her old Town and Country and no one is taking my Miata.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Not participating much lately but this topic baited me into signing in.

    I think there are two entirely different ways to rank Accords:
    A) Best in absolute terms
    B) Best relative to the competition at the time

    A goes like this:
    9, 7, 8, 6, 4, 5, 3, 2, 1

    Cars generally get better over time. But I think the well-proportioned, well-equipped 7th gen was better than the bloated 8th gen and the perfectly proportioned 4th gen was better than the awkward, slightly cheapened 5th gen.

    B is much more interesting to think about. It goes like this:
    3, 2, 4, 1, 9, 7, 5, 6, 8

    The third-gen Accord felt like a visitor from outer space. It’s impossible to overstate just how badly its design and refinement thrashed what everyone else was offering in 1986. With the exception of the carbureted base engine, it was a car ten years ahead of its time. Honda has never been so far ahead before or since, with the single possible exception of the second-gen Legend.

  • avatar
    TangoR34

    5th Gen, 4th and 3rd.

    And I wouldn’t call any “Accord” after 5th gen an Accord anyway. Not when you compare the JDM versions.

  • avatar
    TangoR34

    5th Gen, 4th and 3rd.

    And I wouldn’t call any “Accord” after the 5th gen an Accord anyway, not when you compare them to the JDM versions.

  • avatar
    Clueless Economist

    I would have thought it was obvious that the 4th gen was by far the best Accord with the 5th, 6th and 7th being universally viewed as the era of boring and poorly designed Accords.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Happy owner of a 9. I won’t write the best to worst in order but I would say the best is probably got to be 2. I remember a friend’s mom had one and it seemed so high quality and revolutionary compared to the Omnirizons, Citations, and Fairmonts that my other friends’ parents’ had. That’s really the car that solidified Accord as the high-quality alternative to American vehicles.

    As to the worst, I would say 8 looks very awkward and it was way, way too big. I love my 9 but I still think it’s about 10% too large. But at least it’s smaller than the previous generation.

    I hold high hopes for 10. I hope it continues to get smaller. And with a manual transmission I will almost certainly buy another one, unless I decide to go with a GTI or Golf R. I never thought I would see the day when the car I got most excited about was in a freakin’ Honda Accord. But I guess that’s the times that we live in now.

  • avatar
    Steve Lynch

    I was affiliated with the brand for gens 2 to 5. Gen 3 was the best. As others have mentioned, it was far, far superior to the competition.

    4 was scary for Honda. It was a better car but a huge letdown in looks after 3. Thus we launched it with the tag line, “You have to drive it to believe it!”

    Kudos to Honda for the great photo of all 9!

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The 4th-Gen in the picture is a Hampshire Green EX wagon of 1991 vintage, only one which came with a driver’s airbag instead of the mouse belts. (May have had ABS too.)

      If Honda would go retro on colors, either that green or the unique-to-the-Civic-EX-Sedan in 1992-1995, Torino Red Pearl, would rock!

  • avatar
    ryannel2003

    Having been a four time Accord owner myself (’01 V6, ’08 EX-L, ’16 LX, ’17 EX) I would say the current 9th Generation car is the best of all the Accords built. Like many have mentioned above Honda fixed a lot of the annoying NVH the previous cars had while still having that light, toss able feel combined with Honda reliability that makes the Accord better than the competition. My ’08 was probably my least favorite as that car had a lot of road noise and the interior had some poor material choices (terrible leather quality). It was also a very large car and the 4 cylinder felt burdened from time to time. The 2001 was a great car with a really smooth V6 and a nice, planted ride but the transmission felt fragile and it had some rust issues.

    My favorite Accord generation would have to be the 4th though. That car had a wonderfully simple yet elegant design and an extremely high quality and well built interior with plush carpeting and really wonderful velour fabric. My grandmother had a white ’92 LX that I grew up riding around in and I always loved that car though I can distinctly remember the harsh shifting automatic transmission and the radio had poor reception. She sold the car to my aunt who drove it another 70k miles and that’s when it started having issues with the A/C and I believe the transmission started acting up around 160k miles.

  • avatar
    mechaman

    I have only two limited experiences with Accords, one 1st gen that had been ridden hard and put up soaking wet and the current 6th gen I have now as a result of accident-caused necessity … so I can only add that the 7th gen is the one that looks best to my eye, and after that, Honda lost the styling candle. The 8th gen is one of the clumsiest looking vehicles I’ve ever seen, from that wonky grille that seems half connected depending on angle, to the bulgy headlight nacelles (I hate that feature on ANY car) and the awkward taillights, it just makes me itch…now just what IS wrong (outside of styling) with the 7th generation, may I ask?


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