By on July 14, 2017

2018 Honda Accord Touring

After a brief history lesson underscoring just how important the Accord has been to North America throughout the last four decades, Honda unveiled the 10th generation of its midsize sedan to a semi-enthusiastic audience in Detroit today.

To be fair, it’s not the most exciting segment occupying the automotive landscape, but it is one of the most important — despite losing significant ground to crossovers and SUVs over the last few years. Honda clearly doesn’t want the Accord relegated exclusively to unimaginative buyers needing nothing more than basic transportation and fleet sales.

Despite sinking sales, automakers aren’t giving up on the midsize sedan, and Honda has placed some genuine effort behind the new Accord. That doesn’t mean they’ve converted it into a heart-stopping thrill ride, nor should they, since that’s not the kind of car it’s supposed to be. But they’ve taken steps to ensure the vehicle has improved in meaningful ways. While that didn’t stop Jeff Conrad, senior vice president of American Honda, from claiming it was “unquestionably the most dramatic remake of the Accord that we’ve ever done” at the unveiling, there is truth in that statement.

However, some the biggest changes coming to the 2018 Accord are what you won’t find in the upgraded model.

2018 Honda Accord Touring

There won’t be a coupe in the 10th-gen Accord’s lineup, nor will there be a V6. Power options include two turbocharged inline-fours and a hybrid. The base-trimmed car receives a 1.5-liter 16-valve DOHC direct-injected turbo four producing 192 horsepower and foot-pounds of toque. Peak power arrives at 5,500 rpm while maximum torque is available at 1,500 rpm. Stepping up to the 2.0-liter i-VTEC yields a total of 252 hp at 6,500 rpm and 273 lb-ft of torque from 1,500 to 4,000 rpm. That’s a clear, but not egregious, downgrade in power from the 3.5-liter V6 it replaces. That mill cranked out 278 ponies and 252 lb-ft.

Conrad echoed the cry of enthusiasts everywhere when he said Honda wanted to “save the manual,” and promised each of the powerplants could be mated to an optional short-throw six-speed in sport trim. Otherwise, the 1.5-liter comes with a CVT whereas the 2.0-liter will have a standard 10-speed automatic.

2018 Honda Accord Touring

The hybrid powertrain will utilize a 2.0-liter Atkinson cycle engine that Honda claims will offer the best thermal efficiency of anything it currently has on the market. However, detailed specifications, including power and fuel economy ratings, will be released closer to launch. Honda also withheld the mpg figures for the non-hybrid cars, but promised they would be impressive.

All of the models are, expectedly, front-wheel driven. They should also be more sprightly than the current-generation Accord, thanks to a stiffer and lighter body utilizing 54.2-percent high strength steel. Depending on trim, total weight reduction ranges from 110 and 176 pounds. A redesigned MacPherson suspension with aluminum control arms affixed to an aluminum subframe is up front, while the rear uses a smaller multilink setup. Adaptive dampers are standard on high-end trims but an optional extra on the more affordable units.

2018 Honda Accord Touring

New Accords will also come equipped with a two-mode driving system featuring normal and sport settings. Sport engages with chassis and drivetrain components by firming up the variable-ratio electric power steering, improving the drive-by-wire throttle response, sharpening the automatic transmission’s gear-holding abilities (if you didn’t get the manual), tweaking the adaptive dampers and adding some auditory oomph through the active control system.

Meanwhile, the normal setting can be paired with the now-classic Honda ECON button for when you just want to be a conscientious, planet-saving nerd.

Stepping up the Accord’s safety game is a standard suite of active and passive technologies. Adaptive cruise control, lane assist, automatic emergency braking, reverse camera, and road departure warnings all come standard. However, safety obsessed drivers may want to purchase the optional upgraded blind spot monitoring, parking sensors, cross-traffic alert, and driver drowsiness detector.

2018 Honda Accord Touring

The interior looks to provide exceptional outward visibility, aided largely by the Accord’s fairly thin A-pillars. Spaciousness doesn’t appear to have diminished. The front seats are positioned slightly inward to provide some extra hip, shoulder and headroom. Extending the vehicle’s wheelbase by 2.16 inches provides rear passengers with 2.5 inches of additional legroom without adding to the vehicle’s overall length.

Infotainment is controlled through an 8-inch touchscreen that — and Honda was careful to mention this — includes a physical volume knob. That particular announcement garnered more applause from the crowd than almost anything else. If you’ve ever tried to use the horrendous slider on most late-model Hondas, you know exactly why this is so important. Without being hyperbolic, we can state that this may be the single best change made to the new Accord.

2018 Honda Accord Touring

Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capabilities are both standard. Optional extras include wireless charging and 4G LTE on-board Wi-Fi. HondaLink telematics are also available for those interested in remote locking, engine starts, diagnostics, or roadside assistance. A configurable 6-inch head-up display is included on the the premium touring versions.

As for the exterior styling, Honda has definitely taken a more conservative approach to the Accord than Toyota did with the Camry. It’s remains easily recognizable but shares some of the same design language as Civic. It’s slightly boxy and angular without being squared off, and the hood seems exceptionally low and long from some angles. The tail is gently swept back and, although it hints at the possibility of a hatch, the Accord remains a traditional sedan.

No pricing has been announced but expect Honda not to stray too much from the current model’s MSRP. All variants of the 2018 Accord will be assembled at Honda’s Marysville, Ohio plant, while the 1.5-liter and 2.0-liter turbo engines will be produced in Anna, Ohio.

2018 Honda Accord Touring

[Images: Honda]

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130 Comments on “2018 Honda Accord Abandons the V6, Ditches the Coupe, Maintains the Manual...”


  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Well I guess I don’t think the Accord is at all cool any more…

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Just another turbo 4 midsize. No wonder the segment is on deathwatch.

    FWIW the first automotive magazine to publish new 300 hp Camry vs all it’s midsize competition (Altima is now the only other V6 correct?) will get me to pick it up off the newsstand and buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      These people are not getting it (they don’t care, of course) – Mazda has nice sporting suspension. Honda has huge wheels to compensate for lack of it. Mazda even on 16 inchers rides great! And turbo… Death to them all

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      Midsize sedans are not profit centers. If the manufacturers can’t make good margins per vehicle, they need to reduce costs and focus on CAFE achievement. Honda is moving the right direction. Cheap, efficient, and cheerful is how they achieved anything in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      HEOJ

      Well its not a V but the Legacy is still hanging around with it’s H6, but that’s the only other 6 cylinder non premium/luxury midsize V6 I can think of.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I love the Turbo 4.

      Just gave up my V6 Cadillac for a Turbo 4, and WOW its SOOOO much more powerful and fun to drive, I don’t get the hate for turbo 4s.

      you can’t get ANYTHING from a V6 in daily driving. Peak torque is at like 5-6k RPM which is impossible to see in the real world.

      Give me a turbo 4 with peak torque at 1400 or 1500 RPM, and daily driving is AWESOME.

      Hyundai 2.0T > BMW I6 > Cadillac CTS DI 3.6L

      After my experience, I truly recommend the turbo 4s of other makes like Camaros. Sure I love my V8s for the race tracks (I race vettes, have a ferrari, etc.) but for DD service, I’ve not found an engine better than the I4s (although I do like my diesel w/ over 1000 ftlb, but even that you never use unless your trying to be obnoxious)

      I don’t know how anyone could prefer a V6 to a turbo 4 unless they are tracking the thing and can spool it up.

      • 0 avatar
        Eddie_B

        Appreciate the contrary opinion.

        I have a BMW I6 which I love. I can pass with just a little planning, such as switch the gear to D/S. Revs go up quickly and stay there easily, while my unsuspecting passengers fail to notice the 30 mph gain in a blitz. I haven’t experienced a turbo 4 – I understand the easier buy in to pass, but what happens at the top end?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I simply don’t like turbo for the practicality reasons. Extra parts = more things can go wrong. Also, the performance numbers posted are with use of premium gas. With regular gas, performance will be less. I hate paying for premium. For these 2 reasons, I would rather have slower regular engine.

      • 0 avatar
        TW5

        @ arach

        Turbos are fun to drive, but they are not good for reliability or shade-tree work. They aren’t more efficient in spirited driving, either, because the incoming change air gets so warm. Intercoolers and DI can alleviate these problems, but it’s just more complexity and money.

        Though V6 are usually tuned to make peak torque at higher rpm, they often create similar torque to a smaller turbo four-banger somewhere around 3,000rpm. Well, this was the way it worked 10-15 years ago. Now the turbos are tuned to produce so much power the V6’s can’t keep up, but that power comes at a price. Compressing that much fuel and air into an engine at low speed has reliability consequences that many people don’t want to deal with.

        Personally, I’d be a boost controller to detune many modern engines. My 2001 1.8T GTI only produced 155lb/ft of torque. It achieved peak from 1750rpm to 4500rpm, but the torque output was relatively modest overall. The new turbo four-cylinders are producing obscene torque. The new Civic 1.5T makes 167lb/ft at 1800rpm. I know Honda cares about reliability, but I don’t trust the cylinder head to handle that kind of pressure, if the car is driven hard often.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          All you have to do is open the hood of new turbo Civic and see all the mess in there, all the hoses and whatever. The super complexity is visible to a naked eye

          • 0 avatar
            carlisimo

            Old Civic engine bays (like in the early ’90s) were a mess of hoses too. Maybe it’s just a Honda thing.

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          Are you serious? That’s not big torque. And turbo engines are built for boost pressure. They aren’t the same as non-turbo engines. Very little to worry about with turbo engines these days.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        I agree. The excellent low rpm torque makes driving an absolute pleasure. My car makes max torque at just 1500 rpm and holds that maximum through 4200 rpm. I’d take that any day over a car that doesn’t make good torque until 5000 rpm.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Turbo-4 FTW!

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Since when did downshifting become a race track only activity? I can’t recall ever having much trouble getting into vtech-yo on either an ITR or a S2000. The latter with a supercharged, built engine with a 10K redline…….. Nor is it that hard to ping off 16K rpms on my 600.

        And, in all instances, the high end wail, and the supernatural crispness of fueling and engine responsiveness up there, is what I remember about those cars (still have the bike..). Ditto for the slightly less high revving, yet still naturally aspirated, V8 in the S63. In no instance do I fondly remember a car engine, because of how great a Cummins diesel impersonation it performed.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I agree but OHC’s peak torque and max bhp are too high. Our LORD 3800’s max torque is 4 grand and max hp at 5.

        The hate arises because so many OEMs are using them as a crutch on tiny motors to move very heavy cars around when a V6 is more appropriate. In an intended application, the turbo powered I4 does make sense (in the warranty period at least).

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      That logic doesn’t scan at all, considering moderately sized crossovers (which continue to grow in sales) are embracing turbo fours over V6’s in equal capacity.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      The Fusion has a turbo V-6 in the Sport.

    • 0 avatar
      Dy-no-mite Jay

      Fusion Sport, 2.7 tt ecoboost v6.

    • 0 avatar
      Lemmiwinks

      Ford still makes the V6 Fusion Sport.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      The Passat still has a v6. As mentioned below, Subaru has the H6.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Jack’s resale just went up.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Dealers nationwide are probably marking up new and used Accord coupes by $3000 upon this news breaking.

      • 0 avatar
        VW4motion

        Why is that ?

        • 0 avatar
          scott25

          The last of the midsize coupes is about to die

          • 0 avatar

            Yes, because no one wanted them and no one bought them (sorry, Jack).

            Have a look at the used values for the coupes. Significantly below similarly equipped sedans.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “no one bought them”

            Not true, 1. they didn’t sell in enough volume and 2. it is too expensive to certify them as a model because fedgov is so f**ked up.

            “Significantly below similarly equipped sedans.”

            GAME OVER TRY AGAIN

            Coupes have always solder higher than their sedan counterparts, at least in the last twenty years.

            MY16 EX-L COUPE V6

            Date Price (USD) Odometer (mi) Condition Engine Transmission Exterior Color Type Region Auction In Sample Year Make Model Style Edition Country
            7/14/2017 $21,250 22,611 4.1 6G Automatic Black Regular West Coast Nevada Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 2D COUPE EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            7/11/2017 $23,700 4,675 6G Automatic Black Regular Northeast Pennsylvania Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 2D COUPE EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/23/2017 $21,200 15,796 3.5 6G Automatic Silver Lease Northeast Pennsylvania Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 2D COUPE EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/21/2017 $22,200 17,208 3.5 6G 6 Speed Red Lease Northeast New Jersey Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 2D COUPE EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/13/2017 $20,000 31,683 2.8 6G Automatic White Lease Northeast Baltimore-Washington Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 2D COUPE EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/6/2017 $17,250 27,351 3 6G 6 Speed Gray Factory Midwest Ohio No 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 2D COUPE EX-L 7/17/2017 US

            MY16 EX-L SEDAN V6

            Date Price (USD) Odometer (mi) Condition Engine Transmission Exterior Color Type Region Auction In Sample Year Make Model Style Edition Country
            7/13/2017 $22,000 10,631 6G Automatic Silver Lease West Coast Southern California Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            7/12/2017 $18,400 30,893 2.4 6G Automatic Black Lease Northeast New Jersey Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            7/12/2017 $18,500 43,186 2.7 6G Automatic Blue Regular Southwest San Antonio Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            7/5/2017 $21,700 18,651 3.7 6G Automatic Silver Lease Southwest New Mexico Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/29/2017 $22,100 14,028 4.6 6G Automatic White Lease West Coast Southern California Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/29/2017 $22,000 17,067 4.7 6G Automatic Silver Factory West Coast Southern California Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/22/2017 $19,700 18,361 2.5 6G Automatic White Lease Northeast Pennsylvania Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US
            6/22/2017 $19,700 38,071 3.9 6G Automatic Black Lease Midwest Chicago Yes 2016 HONDA ACCORD V6 4D SEDAN EX-L 7/17/2017 US

            Manheim redesigned the mmr pop-up, sorry.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    ” It’s remains easily recognizable but shares some of the same design language as Civic.”

    Which is horrible. Keep up the #winning, Honda.

  • avatar
    ttaclogin

    Front grille and the tail lights are not attractive. The lines are clean, wheels look good and the interior is no surprise.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Well….

    Did someone punched it into nose?
    The interior is all Mazda only bigger. The sloping roof. The front is just ugly. Everything else is Ok but not exciting.

    Turbo engines with all the complexity. The shifter! At least they didn’t bring the dash from Odyssey. Honda wheel design lately… oh… Seriously, more reasons not to buy it that to buy it.

    Why in this world 2018 Camry doesn’t come with manual? Bo-o-o-o-o-ring…

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Honda has had sloping front ends for some time, but changing pedestrian impact concerns have blunted the front end. Honda’s been really inelegant in their implementation of this design change, especially the new Civic.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Haha same here on the nose… for real!

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      The Mazda6 is dead. The engine is bottom drawer. They have trouble giving the Mazda6 away.

      Doubtful Mazda will have the $$$ to compete in the midsize class anymore – and certainly not as a premium player.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        Thornmark – why are you always so hateful to Mazda?
        The 6 will continue, just to disappoint you and Tim Can. The US is not the only market. The 6 shares it’s platform with the CX5 which continues to set sales records. Mazda make a profit so can continue to support all their cars. At least Mazda stick with proper automatics and NA engines. The engine is definitely not bottom drawer.

    • 0 avatar
      autoguy

      I agree but Honda/acura designers have a track record of being utterly clueless as to how to design an attractive front end. They beyond a shadow of doubt would win the award to having the most cars with hideous front ends over the last decade (ie. the despised Acura Beak which blemished the auto landscape for years). I would never buy a HOnda/Acura product for styling as they have the worst design studios in the world (the new type R civic is absolutely hideous and I really can’t think of single vehicle that anyone with any taste would deem the vehicle an stunningly attractive design.

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Could’ve been a Sportback (or liftback, hatchback, babygotback . . . )

  • avatar
    JMII

    I owned 3 Hondas… notice the use of past tense. The only reason I recent visited a Honda showroom was to look at the Accord V6 Coupe. I can only assume this is the last model generation that comes with a manual option. That leaves me with ZERO reasons to visit them again.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I stopped visiting Honda long time ago. Remember when their LX models came with rear drum brakes and no split folding seat? And the EX had all that plus bunch of bloat, like sunroof? Why bother, Mazda packaged thing better. Then I drove Civic LX vs Mazda3. In Civic, I had to spend >20K to get blue tooth, which was provided on 16K Mazda3. It always has been the Honda packaging that was detrimental to me.

      This Accord is different story. There is no perfect car but some cars are further from perfect than others. For example, I would like to check current Accord sport but is has 19″ wheels. It is tire maintenance nightmare. Expensive and not long-lasting. I don’t want constantly drive on bold tires and then pay fortune to replace them.

      Even today, they don’t pack standard variable intermittent wipers in base Civics. On top of their packaging issues, if you consider just average reliability for their cars, what is the reason to visit their dealer?

      • 0 avatar
        Felix Hoenikker

        In 2014, I bought a 2014 Accord. Second runner up was the Mazda 6. At base trim levels, the Accord stomped the Mazda for a lower purchase price. While the Mazda may have had slightly better “dynamics” it could not compete against the Accord in every other category.
        That said, I’m not sure that I would take a turbo charged 4 instead of a NA 4 of roughly the same horsepower if you are a buy and hold customer.
        Even the local Honda dealer was not a d**k which was a complete surprise.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Yea, Mazda can’t discount itself into greatness like Camcordnissans. you can usually buy Accord 20% off MSRP, sometimes 25%. But I seriously doubt that Mazda base would have less features vs Accord base (LX).

          • 0 avatar
            thornmark

            Actually, Mazda has to discount much more than Honda in the midsize class. The Mazda6 just doesn’t sell at anything near list.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Actually thornmark you are wrong again. Not long ago when I looked at Midsize cars $4-5k was offered off Accords and Camry and oy $2k off the 6. They cannot discount as much because they are built in Japan. But then Mazda does need to chase volume or have an obsession with being number 1.

          • 0 avatar
            Peter Voyd

            $3000 rebate on Mazda6 through Labor Day. Somewhat tempting.

    • 0 avatar

      Ugh, read the damn article JMII.

      We got no coupe (no big loss), but a manual available on BOTH engine options, including the high-powered turbo. Jesus, all you people do is moan and complain about the changes you imagine have taken place without actually reading to see whether they have.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Uh. Sure.

    I need a porch to shout “get off my lawn!” from.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    That rear shot has a vague Audi A7 feel to it.

    I do like the interior better than the last (2015?) Accord I rode in. But no Honda I’ve ever driven has has had a “world class’ interior.

  • avatar
    cblais

    Wow, with peak torque on the 1.5L arriving at 1500RPM you’ll basically always have all those lb-ft available. The current CVT 4-cyl is already a lovely car for wafting around town and in traffic, and this new engine will further ensure that revs can remain nice and low for minimum noise intrusion. Next to a hybrid, this will probably be the best midsizer for dealing with large city traffic in quiet comfort.

    I bet the 10 speed + 2.0L turbo winds up significantly faster then the current V6 + 6 auto. The Manual combo will probably achieve better fuel economy then the 6 speed coupe, but the 0-60 will be interesting to compare.

    Glad to see some nice stitched padding on the center console where your knees rest, that was one of the little details that impressed me the most about the 2016 Mazda 6 I took for a test drive. Don’t think anybody else in the segment is padding that frequent touch point yet.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    Interesting. Honda’s website says that Honda Sensing is standard on all 2018 Accords. This would, presumably, mean those with a manual transmission as well as automatic. I don’t believe Honda has had Sensing as an option on a manual car before.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      That’s how I read it, too. It would be a significant offering for Honda to include Honda Sensing with manual.

      Mazda offers their Safety Sense package on the Mazda3 hatchback with manual transmission. Outside of that specific model, it’s rare to get Active Cruise and Emergency Braking on ANY car with a manual.

  • avatar
    SixspeedSi

    Seems like I may the odd one out here, but I dig the new style. Too me it’s more cohesive without being completely boring like the 18 Camry. I find it funny that Honda will cater to enthusiasts with offering more manual that very few will buy. Interior looks much more premium, especially with the cooled seats..now about that stupid shifter.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      Yeah, I need to look at it in person. I can’t decide if I like it. The chrome grille has more of a unibrow look to it than the same on the Civic, and it’s pretty blatant on that car.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Funny that you’ve mentioned manual. Funny because even today they have (on paper) LX, EX and Sport; all available with manual. But when you go to your local dealer, they will tell you that they might see once a year one car like that.

      • 0 avatar
        syncro87

        True re: manual availability. They theoretically exist, but the chance of finding one on a local lot is near zero in my area. You can’t even order one. I had my dealer try to find me a manual Civic hatch a while back, it was impossible. Nobody would trade them one, none coming to any dealers in my major city. I could have walked in to any dealer in town with a briefcase of cash, could not have purchased a Civic hatch with a stick shift.

        Actually, if you look at all the Honda dealers in my area today, there are no stick shift Accord sedans, maybe one or two base manual Civics. 6 or 7 good sized dealers in our metro region. No manual HR-Vs, either.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        “I’d like to se an accord with the manual please”

        “Sorry, they don’t make those in a manual anymore”

        “uhh.. yes they do”

        “No they don’t- They haven’t in years”

        “see? here it is”

        “well there’s none in my computer”

        *True conversation when I was car shopping*

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      I don’t like the grille, but other than that it’s probably the best looking sedan Honda has cranked out in 15 years to my eyes. And for actual use a 2.0T that cranks out 273 lb-ft from 1500 to 4000 RPM should make for a better daily driver than the NA V6, especially since it still takes 87 octane. If you can get the adaptive dampers on a 2.0T with the manual it should be one hell of a car.

      Is Honda’s durability record on V6 engines even that great? I’ve heard a lot of mixed things. I wouldn’t be shocked if they end up getting better reliability out of a low boost turbo four that is understressed compared to the tune in the Type R.

    • 0 avatar
      matt3319

      I dig it too. Very classy. Makes the TLX irrelevant. I hope the Sport model is well equipped unlike the current Sport. I think this is my next new car once my daughter turns 16 next May.

      • 0 avatar
        SixspeedSi

        Agree, will be interesting to see it in person. The big chrome bar isn’t my favorite, but has grown on me in the 16+. Good to hear the 10 Speed performs well in the Odyssey and hopefully does the same with the 2.0t. Poor Acura lol

  • avatar
    mikey

    Another Coupe bites the dust : (

  • avatar
    matt3319

    Now that is one beautiful looking sedan. Much better looking than the Camry actually. Still not sure about not having a V6, we will see. Love that the manual is still available. Now just make the manual 6 speed easy to get!!!

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Another example of why people buy CUVs.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I remember Jack writing an article a long time ago about whether he should purchase another V6 coupe before production stops. I think the answer is obvious that he needs to get down to the Honda store.

    I’m also disappointed that that goofy Acura shifter found its way into a Honda.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    I prefer my 1985 Oldsmobile Toronado over any Accord that copies the Acura RLX five years later.
    But today I drove my 2006 SAAB 9/5 just to enjoy a REAL turbo!

  • avatar
    syncro87

    Two questions I’m waiting to hear the answers to…

    1. What is the least expensive trim with the 2.0 and manual trans?

    2. How high in the trim hierarchy to you have to venture to get the 10 speed auto instead of the CVT?

    Speaking of trim levels, now that Sensing is standard, the budget sedan pick is the Accord manual LX. Punchy engine, stick shift, adaptive cruise all included.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      Will adaptive cruise be included?

      On the Mazda 6 GT (stick available in canada), you LOSE the adaptive cruise on the stick.

      I can’t imagine adaptive cruise working on a stick.

      Wish it had a DCT. DCTs are everything great about the manual transmissions coupled with everything great about autos.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Accords are supposed to be reliable. Given how poorly DCTs are being implemented, they’ll probably get the same reputation that diesels earned in the US thanks to Oldsmobile.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I thought I saw SOMETHING that the Sport trims might be the only sticks, 1.5 being LX-grade, while the 2.0 will be EX-grade, with a slightly better stereo.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    It’s better looking than the incoming Camry, but there is still something unpleasant about that front fascia. I prefer Toyota’s approach to the Camry engines.

    It looks like Mazda hit it out of the park with their dashboard design, Kia and now Honda are cribbing it.

    “That doesn’t mean they’ve converted it into a heart-stopping thrill ride”

    Bollocks. I’ve read Car and Driver. The Accord was, is, and always will be just that.

  • avatar
    arach

    Part of me is SUPER PSYCHED. Getting that engine with a stick??? SIGN ME UP NOW.

    However, I can’t get past how ugly it is. With such an awesome looking type R, I was hoping for a more edgy design, but it looks kind of “blah”.

    And in fact everyone I’ve talked to about it with in the office agrees it has a “duck face”. I can’t get past that face.

    Duck face? butter face? if I bought it I’d have to call it my platypus. It looks like a platypus giving a duck face for a selfie.

  • avatar
    brucebanner

    Type R in a tux.

    I like it.

  • avatar
    jalop1991

    Did away with the coupe? Or simply decided to slap a Prelude label on it?

    Make an Accord coupe, drop the Type R motor into it, call it Prelude.

    This is EASY.

  • avatar
    TW5

    I like the front fascia. It somehow creates the illusion that the beltline isn’t a mile high for crash safety. Harkens back to earlier Honda’s, which more more economical, sporty, and rewarding to own.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Much like the Malibu, this really has the longer/lower/wider look down pat. It’s a flattering look.

    The sides remind me of the Genesis G80, which is also a compliment.

    I am not, however, terribly impressed with the tail-lamps, nor with Honda’s decision to have the iPad-on-dash-style infotainment display with buttons and knobs on each side. I don’t mind the iPad look, but when you add buttons to the sides of it (which I’m also seeing on new Hyundai and Kia vehicles), it starts to look tacky.

    I would like to see one in non-Touring guise, which will definitely involve a different (partial-LED) set of headlamps, but which may also have something other than the button-style gear selector.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    Note to Honda. I will buy one in the future with the manual. If there was no manual, I would not buy one. They need to let people know you can get one with a stick, per haps require dealers to keep one in stock.

    ’14 Accord 6 speed manual :)

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    “The interior looks to provide exceptional outward visibility, aided largely by the Accord’s fairly thin A-pillars. Spaciousness doesn’t appear to have diminished. The front seats are positioned slightly inward to provide some extra hip, shoulder and headroom. Extending the vehicle’s wheelbase by 2.16 inches provides rear passengers with 2.5 inches of additional legroom without adding to the vehicle’s overall length.”

    OMG I’m officially old, because all of these things seriously pushed my buttons. First, I’ll admit it, I’m a big guy, but modern cars are seriously cramped, even most of the “full sized” ones. You also can’t see out of them worth a damn. My parentals, heavily of the boomer persuasion, have a 2014 Accord, and it has the roomiest back seat I’ve experienced in a good long while. I never mind riding back there, and the new one is BIGGER. Glorious.

    I also love the way Honda does it’s trim levels. No fuss, no muss. No order this to get that, no $20,000 price range between base model and the top end. God, I’ve almost talked myself into buying one when my 3-series lease is up.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Its not bad looking, the rear is the most unfortunate. It looks better than the Civic, but the tail lights look like an old Camry with a broken/hanging down reflector, and it would be more cohesive as a true hatchback, or a real notchback, not this “fat like a hatchback, but without the versatility of actually being one” half-way look.

    My favorite Accord currently is the I-4/coupe/6MT. Looks like it’ll be my last favorite Accord. This sedan-only (but hatchback look) makes it a car I would highly recommend, but not buy myself. I’m happy it will still offer a manual, and I suppose its a bit unfair to say I’d *never* consider one, but I wish the back looked better and a true coupe or hatch were offered.

    NOT a new CrossTour. There’s a Buick for that now, lol.

    I wish they would come out with a new Prelude. Notchback, naturally aspirated, 6MT, no ugly Civic bumpers.

  • avatar
    HillbillyInBC

    That hood cut is …ummm… unfortunate.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Agree. The only really egregious styling problem I see, other than those ridiculous multiple LED headlights only Honda likes. Surely Honda could have brought the hood to meet the horizontal chrome bar and avoided that nasty cut line – I blame BMW for bringing back this cheapy feature on the 3 series six years ago. Now everybody’s at it. Like ’60s Big 3 cars, nothing ever quite fits or looks harmonious. The rear three-quarter view looks quite tasty to me. Hope the B pillar isn’t all you see looking over your shoulder though.

      There is no Cyclops eye like the Camry, nor two versions of utter crap grilles, or the egregious DLO fail on the C-pillar as Sajeev pointed out.

      As for turbo engines, I’ve had four turbos since 1988 and no problems whatsoever. The shade tree mechanics moan and wail, but they buy used so who cares. It’ll be fun to see whether the 2.0 turbo avoids the BMW “hello I’m a tractor engine” sound of their last two 2.0t’s.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      That’s the biggest fail that I see. The interior looks amazing, OTOH! The taillights will probably look better in person; I suspect that Honda will have a few chrome trim bits available in the accessories catalog to dress up that area a bit.

      In spite of my misgivings about the turbo, I’ll likely end up with a Touring 2.0T in my garage come 2019-ish. (If the 2.0 isn’t to my liking, the Hybrid is definitely on my list since there’s no longer a loss of trunk space in that variant, and the seats fold-down across the range, as well!) Make mine in that red, which may be the Torino Red Pearl which graced my first new car, a 1994 Honda Civic EX Sedan.

      As I’ve suspected would be the case, the Camry isn’t even in the same league as this, feature-wise! I’ve driven only Hondas for the last 23+ years, and I don’t like change; of the two top alternatives, I’ve already mentioned the lack of features in the Camry, and I’m not ready to commit to five years of GM ownership with the Regal GS, itself likely to be a one-time, one-trick pony.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        That red is “Radiant Red Metallic!” Whatevs, it’s a nice candyapple shade that’ll draw less attention from the po-po than a fire-engine red like the Milano Red Pearl of the current Accord Sport. Not as far below the radar as my Modern Steel Metallic, but whatever.

  • avatar
    2kriss2kross

    Like the shape and the front of it. The only part I’m struggling to get used to is the rear, reminds me of a bloated Impreza. What do you call the shape of those taillights? Dig the interior, has a lot of Mazda 6 influence which itself has German influence. Seems like Toyota and Honda continue to take different approaches. Toyota taking a more extreme than the last generation abstract Japanese approach in design for the Camry while Honda this time going for a more European approach especially for the interior for the Accord making it restrained yet premium looking in and out.

  • avatar
    threeer

    I keep looking back and forth at the pictures and can’t decide if I like it, or not. For some reason, it just looks too derivative of so many other vehicles out there. Maybe I need to see one up close to really form an opinion. At least with the Accord, they resisted the impulse to slap large expanses of black plastic on the front and rear (lookin’ at you, Civic).

  • avatar
    scott25

    Definitely the first implementation of Honda’s current design language that isn’t atrocious. I agree the rear looks unintentionally like an Impreza, but the interior is nice. The front won’t look good with a license plate on it at all.

    If you took the front and rear ends away the Camry and Accord look almost identical, I can’t think of another time in history when they’ve been closer in design.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Which is how everything is going in this segment, thanks to the various regulations of one type or other, along with the ravenous appetite for wagons on stilts.

  • avatar
    shaker

    I like that they blacked out the “busy bits” of the grille – still has the dodgy rear-seat headroom/mail slot trunk of the new “Sporty Sedan” style.

    The Hybrid needs to be more affordable.

  • avatar
    Farhad

    No Coupe? No V6? All VCT?
    What else? This sensor, that sensor?
    Thank you, I just forget about it altogether.

  • avatar
    33873

    what’s with the chrome unibrow that’s infiltrating the honda line-up? it’s not sporty, it’s not elegant, it’s not attractive, it’s not functional, it’s just ugly.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    Better looking than the 2018 Camry. I wonder how much the roofline hurts rear seat headroom.

    Interior looks better than the new Camry as well, though the seat bottoms look a bit short.

    Honda made a great v6 for a long time; it will be missed. Partially offset by offering the manual transmission with both engines.

    I think the changes are a mixed bag, but it’s probably still one of the top choices if I were going to shop in the segment.

  • avatar
    palisadesnpo

    As the past owner of a 2013 Sport Sedan 6M, and as a current owner of a 2016 EX-L V6 Coupe, I am disappointed at the loss of the V6 and the Coupe…never been a fan of Turbo 4’s in anything other than small cars. I personally don’t think the 2018 looks bad at all, and I will give them a look in 2019 when my current lease is up…maybe I will have warmed up to Turbo 4’s in larger vehicles by then.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    It a big fan of the multi-front lights, but otherwise this is a great looking car. Especially like the front fender bulge.

  • avatar
    vanpressburg

    I tried the new accord coupe v6- black color, black leather seats.
    The interior is better then BMW interior, Mercedes C class or Lexus interior.
    From outside, in black color,
    it beats many much more expensive cars.
    I don’t understand, why they ditch coupe.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    I going to hold my judgement until I see it in person. Disappointing that it is shape like a liftback, but has a trunk instead. Kind of defeats the styling design. Front end I don’t like either. Just hope that in person, it somehow looks better then in the photos!

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    When the 16 Pilot was introduced, there was a immediate rush for new 2015 Pilots. I think this 18 Accord will have the same effect … an immediate rush for new 2017 Accords that will start in 3 … 2 .. 1

  • avatar
    AK

    Disappointed that the v6 is gone, but that’s how things are going.

    Disappointed the coupe is gone, but again, that’s just the way things are now.

    Love that they kept the stick and the 2.0t sounds promising. The new Honda infotainment is a massive improvement over the current setup.

    Only thing I don’t have a firm opinion on is the styling. Will have to see it in person to get a real feel for it.

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    I don’t understand why there are so few mentions of the Prelude in these comments. I agree that it is the successor to the Accord Coupe. I think I can fit in one easily. I doubt I’ll be able to climb out again.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Hard to believe that the new Accord looks so bad! It kind of unbelievable to me! They did not even bother to go to the next step with their sloping roof line and put a liftback functionality in it but supply it with a regular trunk! Not sure why they design it to look like a liftback similar to the Audi A5 or A7 and not go with a liftback?
    Looks like a Malibu and Sonata got together and had a child and left out the front end component to finish it up so it has a complete to it.

  • avatar
    Chicken Daddy

    Thank heavens they still make it with a manual transmission. I thought that my 2013 v6 6mt coupe would be my last. While the look doesn’t grab me, it will grow on me. I didn’t li the Civic hatch when I first saw it.


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