By on June 17, 2017

2017 Audi Q7 blue front

Audi’s European introduction of the beastly SQ7 SUV caused no shortage of speculation last year. Even as Volkswagen Group’s emissions scandal raged, many hoped the raw power of the SQ7’s cutting-edge diesel engine would be enough to compel Audi to bring the model stateside.

Waiting followed. Then, even more waiting. Audi told excited journos it hadn’t greenlit the model for a U.S. launch, despite its very marketable 435 horsepower and 664 lb-ft of torque — power made possible by 4.0 liters of displacement, two turbochargers and a lightning-quick electric supercharger.

Late last year, Volkswagen CEO Herbert Diess put the chill on expectations, telling everyone it wasn’t likely they’d ever see a new diesel Volkswagen product in the United States. This, despite current advancements in diesel technology. It now seems any hesitation the automaker might have felt about that proclamation has evaporated.

Diesels? Dream on.

Speaking to Car and Driver at a recent Formula E race in Germany, Audi development chief erased any last hopes for oil aficionados. When asked whether the company’s squeaky-clean next-generation diesels might take a U.S. trip, Peter Mertens was blunt about the issue. It’s not just your environmental regulators, it’s you, he said.

“Now you’re putting me in a corner,” Mertens said. “I would say no, and why is that so? I do not believe that Americans in their true belief and heart, their cultural way of driving, are suited to diesel. They aren’t. Everybody tried—we Europeans tried to give an answer maybe to a question that wasn’t asked.”

Americans and diesels just aren’t that compatible, you see. Oil and vinegar. Dharma and Greg. Starsky and Hutch. Mertens explained the problem is not just about technology or culture. While an inability to meet emissions standards led VW down a lawless path a decade ago, VW feels a truly clean diesel is doable — but who trusts it?

“Diesel can be clean with technology, but the problem is the image,” Mertens said. “People think that diesel is bad. It’s not helping us and it’s not helping the environment, speaking frankly. It would be great if we could come back to technical terms and realities instead of alternative facts when it comes to diesel, but it’s very difficult to fight them.”

An engine like the one found in the SQ7 could have proven useful in the U.S., and not just for Audi’s current range-topper. The automaker’s U.S. executives hope to gain approval for an even larger utility vehicle, given it’s the number one request they hear from brand faithful. Americans want a big SUV. However, big SUVs need big power, and though Audi has no shortage of powerful six- and eight-cylinder engines at its disposal, fuel economy remains a concern.

Should U.S. Audi execs get their way, the full-size SUV would likely require some form of electric assistance. If not for the model itself, then one of its variants.

[Image: © 2017 Chris Tonn/The Truth About Cars]

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70 Comments on “No Matter How Big Audi SUVs Get, Don’t Ever Expect a Diesel...”


  • avatar
    derekson

    Objectively the American style of driving suits diesel perfectly. But a combination of economic structure (tax incentives, need of diesel for long distance trucking, cost to meet emissions stands, etc) and consumer preference/opinion just makes it mostly untenable.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      derekson,
      US and EU diesel emission are very similar.

      There is no tax incentives in the EU for vehicle ownership, even diesel. Diesel fuel in the EU is tax higher than the US, much higher.

      I have some Danish friends, they tell me a Golf is around $40 000 to $45 000 to buy.

      If you think EU customers get tax breaks then what would you call the “US tax breaks”.

    • 0 avatar
      Hydromatic

      Personally, I think Americans would vastly prefer the lazy burble of a large-displacement V8 engine, preferably sans turbocharging and within the 6 to 7-liter range.

      Basically, stick an Escalade engine in this thing and see how many people suddenly become very, very happy.

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    So, VW gets caught monkeying with code to pass diesel regs (and it may be that they aren’t the only one), denied it, then when absolutely shown that they were caught, was rather indifferent to their own US customers until court decisions spurred action.

    Now, the tone is essentially “Well, we tried to teach Americans that diesel is better, but they are too stubborn or stupid.”

    I’m partly amazed at the completely unvarnished honestly and lack of corporate jargon in his answer and partly dumbfounded at his inability to recognize that this will alienate VW and Audi’s most loyal customers in North America – their diesel buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      Its the arrogance of being ahead in sales. Let’s not kid ourselves. Audi VAG continue to make money on a grand scale with their current strategy.

      Why would they ‘experiment’ with diesel in the US when they are doing just a-ok as they are?

      IMO that ‘arrogance’ is typical of any large multinational riding on the tip of a wave.

      Companies will not show contrition unless they are in the red. If they need to fight for your patronage then expect humility.

      Audi will never have that.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Tony,
        Dieselgate has affected the way VAG, Audi do business.

        The difference in emission standards in the US vs EU is marginal now. Audi could easily adapt a diesel for the US market.

        Audi’s problem is “what value” does this give Audi in the US.

  • avatar
    Joss

    So ya know no diesel blowback on them Gucci gloves. Howz about urea on your Harry Rosen? Or for lineup for < 5% of America's gas bar pumps.

    Audis are pretty nice to look at. That snout in the above photo IS their ugliest.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Howz about a gasoline V8?

    • 0 avatar
      newenthusiast

      I have the 4.2 V8 in my Q7. It’s a good fit for the size and my usage of the the vehicle (daily driver with kids and friends, weekend long hauler with my kids, stuff, usually bikes and a small trailer, occasionally a boat).

      I don’t understand why they dropped it from the North American lineup for the TDI instead of just adding the TDI (pre-scandal of course). It’s really awesome to feel virtually no loss of acceleration or power even with the extra weight of people and stuff. At highway speeds on my long hauls using cruise control, I still get 19mpg, which given the weight and increased wind resistance, I think is about as good as it will get for a vehicle of its weight with a NA V8.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I don’t expect to ever again see a naturally-aspirated V8 in a German vehicle, but a ~420hp version of the 4.0T would make sense as a Q7 range-topper.

        • 0 avatar
          newenthusiast

          Thatms interesting. Why? Lexus and Genesis both offer NA V8 options in some vehicles. Why would the Germans refuse to give the market something it wants? 420hp is fine, but probably overkill. I think I have 350 and its fine. If the Japanese ca make regs, why can’t they?

          • 0 avatar
            derekson

            Considering Lexus is already phasing out the 5.0L V8 in favor of a new TTV6 starting in the LS, the market doesn’t seem to want this as much as you claim.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Lexus is dropping the V8 entirely from the LS sedan and the rumor is that the GS is on death row. That just leaves the RC and LC to carry on with the 5.0L. I’d be surprised if the 5.0L gets a NA V8 successor. The LX and RX will likely keep their V8s for awhile, but I’m not sure what the distant future holds for those BOF stalwarts.

            Genesis has already said they don’t see a future for the V8 in their brand so I’m expecting the 5.0L to be replaced by the 2020 MY for something with forced induction.

            Among Audi, BMW, and Mercedes I think the only naturally-aspirated engines left *at all* for sale in North America are the R8’s V10 and the V6 in the GLE350. I believe Porsche’s only naturally-aspirated offering is the V6 in the base Cayenne.

            Not German, but Jaguar, Land Rover, and Alfa are also forced induction only for their US lineups.

            I could be wrong but I think the Maserati GranTurismo and Aston Martin Vantage are the only NA V8 vehicles available for sale in the USA right now from any European automaker.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            ajla,
            I would think outside of the US market Toyota will continue with their V8 turbo diesels. They are regarded as the best option over the gas V8s.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            Lexus really should have used the 5.0 V8 across the LS lineup and not just for the poor selling hybrid.

            Wouldn’t be surprised if Hyundai has plans for a boosted smaller displacement V8 – which would not only be used for the G90, but the LWB G90 (not available here), the planned halo GT and maybe a performance variant of the G80 (most likely would also have some sort of electrification).

            Would be surprised if Toyota just sticks with a turbo 6 cylinder for its flagship sedan.

            The Germans are still planning to continue to offer 12 cylinders in their flagship sedans, so a 6 cylinder just really won’t do (will need at least an 8).

    • 0 avatar
      Bazza

      What I keep hearing from the fanbois is that a 2.0L turbo is all the motor you need in a nearly 5000 lb “luxury” SUV.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    The problem with diesel in the States is all about fuel prices. Diesel motors always cost substantially more to buy than the gasoline equivalent, but traditionally get about 30% better mpg. The payback is much faster in Europe where fuel prices are double or more the US price, and where diesel is often substantially cheaper than gasoline due to tax breaks. In the States where gasoline is 2.50 gallon and diesel is substantially higher, your diesel price premium payback is going to be decades unless you drive 30,000 miles per year. Not to mention that diesels also sound terrible, can have seriously expensive problems with particle filters, injector pumps, etc., and the fuel mileage gap between diesels and gasoline vehicles is shrinking, it makes the ownership proposition very unattractive to most Americans.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      The tax breaks also exist for structural reasons in the economy though. Europe doesn’t use nearly as much diesel fuel for long distance trucking and other industrial uses as the US does, so there are reasons they can afford to encourage its use while the US can’t and never could.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The allure of diesel is the large torque output at low rpms. That’s what drives a heavy vehicle, not horsepower. For the vehicles they want to sell here, they need a powerplant with a high torque output, and their experience is with diesel engines in Europe.

      What Audi is forgetting is not only that diesel isn’t cheap here like Europe, but that gasoline is much cheaper here than Europe. They’re basically telling U.S. customers they’re as clueless about American market conditions as their corporate honchos at Volkswagen.

      For the heavyweight vehicles they want to sell here, they need bigger gasoline V8s than they have, and they need to get off their home market based need for high MPG. What they need to do is buy 6.2 Hellcats from FCA!

    • 0 avatar

      Your definition of “substantially” must be a lot different than mine. I know the spread is wider in some other parts of the country, but in my neck of the woods gas is currently $2.099 at the Exxon while diesel is $2.179. I’m hardly a math whiz but I’m pretty sure that’s less than 30% difference, which makes up for the fuel economy bump.

      And frankly, bump or no bump I prefer the torque curve of the diesel. The whole “rev the crap out of it like a VTEC to squeeze out a dab of power” is comical nonsense as far as I’m concerned.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        LCD – 8 cents per gallon higher than gasoline is substantial compared to much of Europe where diesel is can be 50 cents per gallon cheaper than gasoline, and certainly changes the economic calculations very favorably towards diesel versus the US. I also like the diesel torque curve, but modern gasoline turbos really aren’t that much different, so that gap has also shrunk.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Stingray,
      I think you’ll find the lower quality US diesel contributes towards some of the ills affecting US diesels.

      • 0 avatar
        stingray65

        Big Al,

        You are absolutely correct about US fuel lower quality, but if you read the forums in Europe about diesels and you still see plenty of expensive complaints about particle filters and pumps/injectors and dual mass flywheels.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Stingray,
          Australia has those issues as well. It seems injectors have gotten better. I don’t hear about significant numbers of pumps.

          There also seems to be specific engines – manufacturers that will have a run of issues. But, gas engines are the same as is some of the crappy auto tx getting about.

          Dual mass clutches are expensive. When mine goes, I’ll buy a clutch kit.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @BigAl: You mean dual-mass flywheel. When mine went, it just blew apart. I can’t remember the exact parts it took out, but it was pretty much major carnage inside the housing. I had to replace both the clutch, the flywheel, and a few other parts. It wasn’t easy and it wasn’t cheap.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            mcs,
            Sorry, dual mass flywheel.

            They are expensive in Australia. I should research and find out their expected life.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Diesel prices aren’t that terrible – where I buy gas, regular is currently $1.96/gal, and diesel is $2.11/gal. But, yes, diesel engine options are still too expensive, and not many Americans have any interest in diesels. It’s mainly diesel enthusiasts.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        dukeisduke,
        I do believe the diesel vs gas by purely using fuel pricing is overdone.

        If the price of fuel is the driver, then why are V8s so popular? Why are less efficient CUV, SUV and pickups popular.

        Diesel, like a V8 gas is about torque as well. The diesel advantage is great FE, but not the sole driver of diesel sales.

        Diesel is also about the “diesel experience”.

  • avatar
    W210Driver

    The lack of a diesel engine option in that beast is a real shame. Imagine the benefits of having an oil burner in this particular car! Agile overtaking and acceleration performance coupled to that legendary diesel fuel economy.

    Sure, gas is cheap but some of us enjoy getting bit more range in our vehicles before we need to exit and fill up! For that luxury I’ll gladly pay a little more at the pumps.

    Alas, diesels are practically dead in our nation, and this is why I shall hold on to my ’98 E300 Turbodiesel Wagon for decades to come.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    My sister and her husband bought a Q7 a few years ago. They ordered it from a local Audi dealer. When it arrived she said there was a little event with champagne and stuff. It was fine for a minute or so, then her husband, Steve, said, “That’s not the car we ordered.” Some confusion followed, during which the fizz went off of both the champagne and the fob presentation ceremony. Steve told them that, as their old SUV was gone, he’d plate this Q7 and use it until theirs turned up.

    He’s not a car guy by any means but I remember him going on and on about this Q7: How powerful it was and how fun it was to drive, etc. I put it down to just New Car syndrome. After a few weeks there was a phone call from the Audi dealer saying their car had arrived and could they make the switch immediately, like this afternoon? Steve and my sister went there to find an ashen-faced manager and the embarrassed salesman. Their car was there ( correct colour and options ) so they traded fobs and Steve plated their Q7. The manager was quite relieved when he received negative answers to his queries about speeding tickets and accidents. He then confided that this particular Q7 wasn’t supposed to be in this country or even on this Continent, as it wasn’t certified…

    Steve had had the 6.0L twin-turbo V12 Diesel for a few weeks – completely illegally. Had he been pulled over the car would have been impounded and had he had a crash his insurance was for a 3.0L Diesel, not a 6.0L V12 Diesel and would have been invalid. Needless to say I never heard a thing about the driving dynamics of the subsequent 3.0L Diesel!

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Great story (?)

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The car would not have been impounded if he was pulled over, no way the police officer would see if it was a US certified vehicle. As long as the temporary tag was valid they would have left with the vehicle and maybe a ticket.

      Also I’m pretty sure that there would have been zero problems had the need for an insurance claim arose, again they wouldn’t be looking to see if the engine matched what was on the paper work and even if they figured out that it didn’t match it was not because he was trying to get lower rates by telling them it had the small engine.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Sounds like a fish story to me.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        I don’t know exactly how regular vehicle importation works (unloading vehicles off of ro-ros at the entry ports), but isn’t there someone there from the DOT or EPA to check the VINs to make sure that the vehicles meet US regulatory standards?

        My sister and her husband owned a Q7 TDI for awhile (bought it in 2012), and it was pretty cool. I rode in it a few times, the 3.0 was pretty quiet and torquey, and she liked the mileage. They later replaced it with a gas engined Q7.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Just do a search for “diesel” in your local area. You’ll find shops hawking “diesel performance,” which I presume, includes coal-rolling modifications. Check out the diesel-themed magazines, which cover a range of vehicles from large trucks to monster trucks. Notice the obviously diesel vehicles on the roads around you, smoking and clattering: they’re trucks. In the USA, any mention or thought of diesel fuel relates to large trucks, and that’s not VWAG’s product. They were losing this mindshare game even before the scandal, and now the only meaning their treasured TDI brand has is “cheater.”

    It’s a shame that a once-promising technology ended up this way, but that’s where we are now. So VWAG might as well stay away from any diesel aspirations, normal or turbocharged.

  • avatar
    mart_o_rama

    I test drove the 3.6 V6 and the 4.2 V8 a few years back and thought the V6 was plenty of power, and I was coming from an older S8 with the same 4.2 V8. I ended up buying only a few years later and chose the TDI V6, after discovering it was basically in the middle between the V6 “TFSI” and the now gone V8 in terms of subjective performance.

    It’s a shame the Diesels at going away, I think it is very well suited to large SUV. And it’s actually nice to pay less for diesel than gasoline during the summer time.

    Next SUV might be an Atlas though, Audi is losing me with their exterior design…

    Cheers!

    • 0 avatar
      newenthusiast

      Where are you that you are paying less for diesel than gasoline? That’s pretty uncommon (although not unheard of) in the US and Canada. That would be a reason to get a diesel. Right now premium where I live is $2.65 or so at Costco, and $3.25 or so everywhere else close to me. Diesel is closer to $4.35/gallon. Its a huge price difference.

      • 0 avatar
        Mike N.

        Around me, regular unleaded is around $2.099 a gallon, and premium around $2.429. Diesel is typically around $2.159, though the place by me I usually use (unless I’m near the one Costco in my area selling diesel) is selling diesel for $1.999 a gallon. Basically about the same as mid-grade. I’ve always driven German cars that require premium (even my VW’s), so my current X5 diesel has always been cheaper to fuel than my wife’s E350.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        Keep in mind that most Audis likely take premium as do many luxury marques, so if you’re compared a TFSI Audi to TDI then it’s Premium vs. Diesel.

      • 0 avatar
        mart_o_rama

        In eastern Canada, diesel is usually 0.10~0.20$/liter less expensive than regular gas during the summer time, in the winter time it is the reverse.

  • avatar
    E85

    All they have to do is convert these engines to ethanol engines. The US currently produces about half as much ethanol as diesel fuel (16 billion gallons versus 30 billion gallons a year of on-road diesel fuel), and could easily produce more. That’s more than enough to run millions of ethanol-powered vehicles. Just add ethanol-only pumps at the gas stations instead of diesel pumps.

    The 3-liter ethanol engine built by Ricardo produced more power and torque than the 6-liter Duramax diesel engine, without all the particulate crap and regen filters and all the rest of the bs you need to use what is basically a filthy fuel.

    Diesel is greasy and smells bad, which is why Americans don’t like it.

    Ethanol is clean with no bad smell, it cleans the engine, you don’t have to change the oil, it’s 120 octane, it’s carbon neutral if properly produced, it’s cheaper, and we have plentiful supplies. All vehicles in Brazil run on ethanol, including compression-ignition buses and trucks. Existing diesel engines can be converted to run on ethanol. So why don’t we use it?

    • 0 avatar
      LazyJK

      How does it “clean the engine”? Which parts? And no oil changes? Riiiiight…

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        Mr. “E85” is talking a pant load. You’d likely find fewer carbon deposits in an ethanol burning engine, but that’s a bout it. Ethanol combustion still generates water vapor some of which blows by the rings and gets into the crankcase. Additionally it generates aldehydes such as acetaldehyde and formaldehyde, which under certain conditions may end up in the oil as acetic and formic acid, depleting the oil’s TBN. Acetaldehyde is also the first thing your body breaks ethanol down into when you drink, and is one of the things contributing to hangover symptoms. Oh, and acetaldehyde are also smog forming.

        The simple reason why we don’t use it is because it’s not the perfect fuel you promote it as.

        • 0 avatar
          LazyJK

          Whenever I hear of any ‘engine cleaning’ solutions I always ask ‘what does it clean?’ Will the tops of my pistons become shiny? Will I be able to see my reflection inside my exhaust manifold? Or will it prevent carbon buildup on the tops of my valves? It won’t, because in direct injection engines the air/fuel mixture never goes there, and in indirect injection engines the backs of the valves are effectively washed at every intake stroke. Maybe if you have a plenum injection engine it could help… maybe, but I have not seen objective evidence yet.
          A little bit related: I attended a sales traiing for Liqui Moly motorcycle fuel additives and the guy’s ‘proof’ was some pictures and a hearty ‘belive me, it works!’ Laff…

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lazy,
            GDI’s create more particulates than a mofern diesel. They will build up.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            no, GDI engines don’t create more particulates than diesels. they may *emit* more, but that’s because they don’t have particulate traps.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            JimZ,
            I stand corrected.

            I should of stated “current GDI engines” are emitting more particlates than diesel.

      • 0 avatar
        E85

        How does ethanol clean the engine? It’s a clean burning fuel. It produces no soot on combustion. If you watch this old video by David Bloom you’ll see the difference with gasoline. Diesel of course is even worse. https://youtu.be/ZpuQ0Xm65RA

        fuel injector cleaner is mainly ethanol. this is one of the problems with running E-85 through an engine that’s been running on gasoline…it cleans out all the carbon deposits and can clog filters. but that’s not ethanol’s fault, it’s the gasoline.

        and of course here we’re talking about diesel. but the advantage of running alcohol in a diesel engine is that you already have the high compression and robust construction to take advantage of ethanol’s high octane ratio.

        there are two ways to do it. you can leave it as compression ignition, in which case you actually increase the compression ratio and add an “ignition improver,” since now the higher octane is working against you, and a lubricant. Scania buses in Brazil work like this.

        or you provide an ignition system. In 1997 four over-the-road trucks were converted to alcohol fuel. apart from some minor problems, which have been dealth with by improved technology since then, the experiment was a success. the trucks ran fine, without all the particulate problems plaguing modern diesels.

        https://www.afdc.energy.gov/pdfs/3598.pdf

        ORT trucks deal with the problem with a regenerative filter. this is a complicated system using urea in a separate tank (Diesel Exhaust Fluid) that requires periodic cycling to heat the filter (using more diesel fuel) to burn off the soot particles and discharge them to atmosphere. all these regen filters do is reduce the size of the particles, which is probably worse for human lungs, but who knows since nobody has done any studies on this.

        Alcohol engines avoid all these problems, and produce more power and torque to boot, as demonstrated by the Ricardo engine, and an engine built by Cummins that you never hear of.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      E85,
      Except all that corn farming is fncking the land and rivers (the environment) more than fracking.

      I’d say stop ethanol and use the corn in feed lots. Export some beef, there is a large growing beef market and probably more money to be had without the subsidised and protected corn farmers.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The corn used for making ethanol does end up in feed lots as a better form of feed than it was as unprocessed corn.

        • 0 avatar

          If they want us to use ethanol they’re going to have to do something about the cost when it’s not subsidized. There WAS only one E85 pump in my entire county, and area a third the size of Ohio. And as of six months ago, it was $2.999 a gallon when unleaded was $2.299 a gallon. In fact it was $2.999 a gallon for the entire time the station carried the fuel. They eventually turned off the pump because no one was stupid enough to use it. Not at that price. And it’s not for lack of flexfuel vehicles in this part of the world, either.

          Imagine how much it’d cost if it wasn’t subsidized! The corn industry already has its fingers in everything we eat, we don’t need them in our gas tanks, too.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Scoutdude,
          I don’t think so. Corn waste from ethanol is being used as feed. There is a difference.

          The land wasted to grow ethanol corn could be used for other crops and livestock.

          Ethanol is a waste. Its primary intention had more to do with US energy security than pollution.

          Like the US pickup market that has become reliant on the chicken tax, a huge chunk of US agriculture is reliant on an outdated energy policy.

          US dairy is the same. The Fed pays dairy farmers to produce. Then Trump whines about Canadian milk that is unsubsidised.

          If there is too much US milk then why the subsidy? Our free market dairy is cheaper in Australia. Handouts and protection is not condusive for good economic management.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            “Like the US pickup market that has become reliant on the chicken tax…”

            @BAFO – That’s got to be the stupidest thing I have ever heard!!!

            Oh wait, were you referring exclusively to the Ridgeline, Tacoma, Tundra, Titan and Frontier???

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Um DiM,
            Um, dumb, WTF?

            Then why the tax?

            Where are your imported pickups?

            DenverMike, you must be trolling, really.

            I don’t think you are that fncking stupid. That comment you made is the type of comment that requires editing.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The Chicken tax was an act of offence, not defense, dumba$$. Look it up if you’re gonna comment. Totally ignorant.

            Make a list of the “denied” global pickups and minivans and how they would adversely affect sales of “US pickups” (not counting those by Honda, Nissan, Toyota obviously). What “competition” is there out there for “US pickups”, especially the 3/4 ton and up variety??

            Note, GM/Ford/Chrysler are the biggest “victims” of the tax, with the vans they import or would like to.

            If there’s any beneficiaries to the Chicken tax (going back to your “list”), it’s Toyota, Nissan, Honda, VW, Hyundai, Kia, Subaru and others.

            So ask yourself who the Chicken tax is kept around for.

  • avatar
    LazyJK

    Big, complicated and powerful VW-group diesel engine? Imagine all the potential ways for it to blow up!

  • avatar
    JRobUSC

    “Diesel can be clean with technology, but the problem is the image,” Mertens said. “People think that diesel is bad. It’s not helping us and it’s not helping the environment, speaking frankly. It would be great if we could come back to technical terms and realities instead of alternative facts when it comes to diesel, but it’s very difficult to fight them.”

    Wow, that’s pretty infuriating to read, seeing as how the bad image he’s referring to WAS CAUSED BY HIS COMPANY. Those European companies he said tried unsuccessfully to help diesels image? HIS CHEATING, LYING OMPANY SCREWED THEM OVER. What an ass.


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