By on June 21, 2017

2018 Toyota Camry XLE Hybrid - Image: Toyota The 2018 Toyota Camry will be priced from $24,380, including delivery, when it goes on sale this summer — a $425 increase compared with the base 2017 Camry.

Riding on an evolution of the Prius and C-HR’s Toyota New Global Architecture, the 2018 Camry is an all-new design for the first time since the 2012 model year. Market positioning is key, even for a Camry that’s been America’s best-selling car for 15 consecutive years, as demand for midsize sedans is quickly falling and even Toyota is seeing greater interest in the RAV4 than the historically dominant Camry. With new competitors approaching from Honda and Nissan, Toyota isn’t fooling around with this hugely important launch.

All eighth-generation Camrys are equipped with an eight-speed automatic. There’s essentially no tangible weight increase. The Camry offers the most standard horsepower in the midsize segment, the optional 3.5-liter V6 now produces 301 horsepower, and all Camrys now include Toyota Safety Sense P with pedestrian detection, radar cruise control, lane departure alert with steering assist, and auto high beams.

Perhaps most notably, highway fuel economy jumps all the way to 41 miles per gallon; above 50 mpg for Camry Hybrids.

2018 Toyota Camry 2018 MSRP * City
MPG
Highway
MPG
Combined
MPG
L
$24,380 29 41 34
LE
$24,885 28 39 32
SE
$26,085 28 39 32
XLE
$29,335 28 39 32
XSE
$29,885 28 39 32
XLE V6
$35,285 22 33 26
XSE V6
$25,835 22 32 26
Hybrid LE
$28,685 51 53 52
Hybrid SE
$30,385 44 47 46
Hybrid XLE
$33,135 44 47 46

* Includes $885 delivery, processing, and handling fee.

Granted, the only 2018 Camry to earn the 41-mpg highway rating is the basic four-cylinder Camry L, which offers EPA ratings of 29 mpg in the city and 34 mpg combined. (The 2017 Camry was rated at 24 mpg city, 33 highway, 27 combined.)

All other four-cylinder 2018 Camrys are rated at 28 mpg city, 39 highway, and 32 combined, though four-cylinder XSEs produce three extra horsepower (206) and two extra lb-ft of torque (186).2018 Toyota Camry XSE - Image: ToyotaV6 fuel economy likewise improves. In 2017, Camry V6s were rated at 21 mpg city, 30 mpg highway, and 24 combined. Those figures rise by just a single mpg in the city, but the Camry XLE V6 is now rated at 33 mpg on the highway and 26 combined. The sportier Camry XSE V6 is rated at 32 mpg highway.

Meanwhile, the Camry Hybrid is now a significantly more efficient car, as well. In 2017, Camry Hybrids were rated as high as 42 mpg city, 38 highway. The 2018 Toyota Camry Hybrid LE now enjoys EPA ratings of 51 mpg in the city, 53 mpg highway, and 52 combined. The 2018 Camry Hybrid SE and XLE are better than in 2017, but relative to the LE drop to 44 mpg city; 47 highway.2018 Toyota Camry LE rear - Image: Toyota2018 Camry LEs, priced from $24,380, include Toyota Safety Sense P and a driver’s seat with power lumbar support among other expected standard kit.

At $24,885, the Camry LE adds power front seats, a 60/40 split rear seat, an overhead console with sunglasses storage, anti-theft, and 17-inch alloy wheels.

The $26,085 Camry SE, aside from thoroughly differentiated styling, adds single-zone auto climate control, Sport Softex seats, a leather trimmed steering wheel, and 18-inch wheels.

To the SE, the $29,885 Camry XSE adds dual-zone auto climate control, a seven-inch screen, heated leather seats, head-up display, proximity access with push button start, auto dimming rearview mirror, an electric parking brake, LED lighting, 19-inch wheels, dual exhaust, and a panoramic sunroof on V6 models.2018 Toyota Camry LE interior - Image: ToyotaThe more luxury-oriented $29,335 Camry XLE has Tiger Eye wood interior trim in four-cylinder models, textured metal interior, and 18-inch wheels. XSE and XLE models also include a superior audio system. The LE and SE offer a Convenience Package, an Audio Package, blind spot monitoring with rear cross traffic alert, and a sunroof. The XSE and XLE four-cylinder models likewise offer an Audio Package, a panoramic sunroof, and head-up display and bird’s eye view camera. The XSE and XLE V6 models offer a Driver Assist Package with the bird’s eye view camera and an upgraded Entune system.

On the XSE and XLE trim levels, a V6 requires a $5,950 expenditure.

What number jumps out? Yes, while Honda is killing its Accord’s V6 in favour of the Civic Type R’s turbocharged 2.0-liter, Toyota is keeping the optional naturally aspirated V6 engine. But it’s pricier than before. The 2017 Toyota Camry offered a V6 from $32,255 in the XLE V6 trim.

For 2018, the least expensive Camry V6 is now the XLE at $35,285, or $3,030 more than before.

[Images: Toyota]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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83 Comments on “2018 Toyota Camry Prices and Fuel Economy Ratings – More Money, More Power, More MPGs...”


  • avatar
    BOF

    Why are Toyotas so agressively ugly now? I mean, I have owned several, and I just can’t get past it.

    • 0 avatar
      phila_DLJ

      Toyota is very self-conscious about their reputation for being the safe, dull, boring, often automatic choice of most drivers, and every time they roll out a new Camry they insist it will be sportier and more aggressive than the last.

      The results have been grotesque at times,but also futile; soon there will be so many of these on the road (even with declining sedan sales) they will fade into the background like their predecessors, no matter how much they turn up the “styling” knob.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        The automotive press can’t be helping here either. Successive generations of the SE trim have made the car handle far better than any family sedan needs to, but come review time it’s: “The Camry is the safe tepid alternative but it doesn’t stir our soul more than a Maytag. Now this Accord, Honda has made a 4 door sports car here, it tingles us in all the naughty ways….oh, tingle us again Accord”.

    • 0 avatar
      slap

      That and Lexus. They may have “a great personality”, but they were beaten by a huge ugly stick.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    “the 2018 Camry is an all-new design for the first time since the 2012 model year”

    The Camry has been on the “K” platform since the 2002 model year, if that’s how you’re defining “all new.”

    • 0 avatar
      evander

      The Camry joins the Prius on the new global TGNA platform, which is all-new.
      This is the first “all-new” Toyota Camry in its 35 year history

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I was taking issue with the author calling the 2012 car “all new” when it was a re-skinned ’07-’11, which in turn was an updated (with cheaper interior) ’02-’06.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      Thank you for noting this. It’s one of my automotive pet peeves.

      Camry has had interchangeable doors within it’s ‘all-new’ model line-ups for about the last 3 generations.

      It’s kinda like calling the 1992 Caravan or 1992 Taurus all-new and it’s only a minor nit, but I absolutely hated that cars like Camry or Accord get a pass on this.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d say they got their money’s worth out of that platform.

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        I’d argue no less– it’s just that Asian and European manufacturers get a free pass on the practice whenever the domestics are admonished for same.

        “Meet the 2000 NEON– just as bad as the 1999 neon, but now with door frames!”

        “Meet the ALL-NEW 1998 Altima– it’s ALL-NEW and ALL BETTER!!”

        The cars received the same fresh touches and just about no visible parts interchanged– but I do feel all the rags(I picked an old example because this type of mid-cycle refresh is a dying practice in the mass-market and is pretty much only being done by MB and the like) were more critical of the Domestics whenever they saved the engine/chassis and just worked on aesthetics and trims.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          It’s because the Japanese platforms are still competitive a decade later. Look at a 2007 Malibu vs 2007 Camry. No comparison.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Sporty made an important point that I neglected to. The K platform is old, but it was fantastically engineered from the outset. The fact that it is still competitive to this day in the midsize field says a lot. In fact I’d take it over a lot of the more cramped and worse-layed out competition.

          • 0 avatar
            ghostwhowalksnz

            Didnt they make a ‘completely new’ front suspension for the Camry about 5 years back.
            In a FWD car its the only bit they needed to change to make it last the full 15 years, and of course maintain the all important reliability

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            ghost not that I can tell. They may have messed with tuning or the shock internals or something, but the basic layout of a MacPherson front end with their distinct multi-link rear with long twin lateral lower links hasn’t changed not just since 2002, but it’s been fundamentally the same since at least 1992. I personally am a fan of the longevity and relative simplicity of the setup. Rides good, lasts long, easy and cheap to work on when it does finally need tinkering with (well past 150k miles or more typically).

  • avatar
    dchturbo

    Typo on XSE V6: 25xxx instead of 35xxx

    They look different at the loss of being ugly. I really don’t like Toyotas in general, but they tend to be very reliable cars. But they’re appliances. They’re cars for people who don’t like cars or driving.

    Look at that schnozzzzzz…

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Regarding the V6, is this a real bump in power or are the current engines (268hp?) underrated?

    I know Infiniti was pushing over 300hp out of their 3.5/3.7L engines – with some minor complaints about lack of low-end torque. I’ll be interested to see some feedback on the Camry engine.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I’m guessing it’s real. Lexus models have been using a 300+ hp version of this engine for awhile now. The outgoing Camry with the 268hp posts just about identical 0-60 and quarter mile times as the 311hp GS350, but the GS weighs 400 lbs more.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick 2012

        The existing 2GR is one heck of a motor and is probably underrated. I race with some folks from Toyota’s Engineering team, and they stuffed a 2GR into a 1997-2002 Camry. It gets around a track almost as fast as a 911.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          My dream commuter would be a ’94 Camry XLE V6 with a 2GR swap.

          • 0 avatar
            Nick 2012

            This has a manual and looks totally stock but for the cage. It’s tagged and titled in KY and they take it out on the street.

            Toyota uses it as an intern event so offers them free reign of the global Toyota parts bin, so they can get unobtainium parts from anywhere in Toyota’s vast empire.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          I hope it’s beige. I would get great delight in seeing a beige 97 Camry harassing sports cars around a track. Is there a YouTube video of this Frankenstein in action?

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I know the 07-11 Camry V6s were every bit as fast as 350Zs from a roll. Don’t forget that Camrys are kind of light.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I remember in ’07 they made quite a splash at a lot of drag strips and illicit street racing meets. The bloated looking Camry would really shook up the pecking order on new Edge bodystyle Mustang GTs, the 350Z/G35 twins, B16 Civics, etc.

  • avatar
    evander

    Tough act to follow for Honda’s new Accord next month. Toyota put in more than 40 MPG on the 4-banger, more than 300 HP on the V6 and more the 50 MPG on the hybrid. Looks good, and offers a style for every taste, from mild to wild. Now, Honda is on the clock. Toyota will have no problem selling 400k Camry’s in the U.S. next year.

  • avatar
    pprj

    And still, no Apple Car Play or Android Auto.

    • 0 avatar
      djsyndrome

      Android Auto and Car Play are purportedly coming later through an upgrade to the Entune 3.0 units. No word on price or availability yet.

      I don’t understand the reluctance of most of the Japanese manufacturers to get on board with AA/CP. Honda’s had it for a few years now and Subaru is adding it to the mid-cycle refreshes of Outback and Legacy, but most others don’t offer it at all. Mazda, Toyota/Lexus, Nissan/Infiniti all are lagging seriously behind here.

      • 0 avatar
        a5ehren

        Mazda has been saying it is coming “soon” for 2 years now. A little smoke says it is finally coming in 2018 (and an upgrade for older models), but I’ll believe it when I see it.

      • 0 avatar
        beacio_mo

        No Android Auto or Apple Carplay for Entune 3.0. It’s not coming as an upgrade.

      • 0 avatar
        khory

        Where did you read that? Everything I’ve seen indicates that Toyota is hell bent on turning Entune into a competing platform so that they can control all the data they gather about you. I don’t see Carplay or Android coming until it starts hurting sales. I know that’s why I didn’t even consider a Toyota this year.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    We applaud the retention of the V6 just as Toyota prices it further out of grasp. I hope they’ve improved the interior materials to Ford Fusion or Mazda 6 levels, because $36K is a lot to ask for a mainstream midsizer even if it does essentially have the GS350’s engine under the hood.

    The front fascia is really pushing it.

  • avatar
    ant

    are these all direct injection now?

    are they the duel port/direct injection.

    Interesting that toyo went cvt on their corolla, but stayed traditional trans on camry.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yes, they did skip the CVT, praise Jesus.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        IME, CVTs (with enough HP and good programming) are superior to conventional automatics. I never once wished for regular gears or manual control in the Accord 2.4 or Maxima rentals I had, and I actually found the “Sport” mode of the Maxima to be TOO aggressive. Sharp contrast with my G37, or even the ZF8 in the Bimmers I drove. With gears there’s always delay or slop unless you shift yourself.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I thought I was coming around to CVTs, what with my sister in law’s ’10 Rogue piling on 180k+ miles without a hitch. Fluid looked good, computer reported plenty of life on it yet. Then her transmission suddenly failed completely. $2200 for a reman unit from Nissan and “free” installation by my brother and she’s back on the road. For anyone else that would have been a junked car. And if anything she’s very lucky to have gotten 186k out of hers owing to a very highway heavy commute. City driving would have killed it that much quicker.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Fair point… I probably would not gamble on one outside of a warranty. Actually my wife and I just checked out some used Muranos but passed for other reasons. Glad we didn’t get it.

            But the Rogue is an example of CVT done badly- it’s relatively underpowered IMO, and that 2.5 is a bit thrashy and unrefined. CVTs need ample power and smooth running engines. VQ and Honda K don’t mind revving a bit and with enough power they don’t need to.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I’m not talking about driveability, I’m speaking specifically of longevity. If anything, the heavier V6 vehicles are even more worrisome as far as reliability goes.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            gtem, I’m a little skeptical of CVTs long term as well (but not too much, we have a 2.5 CVT Altima), but that is due to rumor more than data. Have you seen anything to suggest they have a higher failure rate than geared autos? That Rogue may have been atypical. Or very typical. Commenter Nels0300 here has recently complained of transmission shuddering in his 2012 or so Camry.

            If CVTs are inherently less durable, both Honda and Toyota have put themselves at considerable risk with the Accord, CR-V, Fit, and Corolla.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            My brother has a fascinating tear down video of the CVT on his channel. It’s really cool and clever engineering, but boy does it operate on the proverbial razor’s edge. The rate of failure is most definitely higher than traditional automatics. I was really coming around to these things, and perhaps the newer ones by Honda and even Nissan will prove to be better. But when I hear of the latest Pathfinders still tearing these things up, it goes back to the basic principle of how these things operate and how excessive torque loads and heat are just that more dangerous.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Significant improvements all around. Will be interesting to see if the demand perks up.

    Hybrid fuel economy gains are very impressive.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I wonder how many V6 Camrys Toyota will sell when the price is in Buick Territory?

    The normal 4 cyl-equipped Camry, I suppose provides adequate power for most, but I believe I’d still rather have a Malibu instead, but that’s because I don’t really like Toyotas anyway.

    When I first saw images of this Camry, I believed I would like it. I’m not sure, I’ll have to check one out in person.

    • 0 avatar
      rentonben

      Agreed…At that price, you’re in AWD Buick Regal GS / Stripper Lacrosse territory – though we’ll have to see what the pricing on the 2018 AWD/V6 Regal GS will be however.

      Kudos to Toyota for putting the radar cruise on all of them – that one feature that GM makes you buy the expensive version of their cars if you want.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Any pictures of the SE front clip from before the crash testing?

  • avatar
    nels0300

    $35K for the V6, jeepers creepers.

    Not even 4 years ago you could get a V6 Camry for $25K after incentives, I bought one.

    Wonder what the street price will be on these new ones?

    Wouldn’t buy a first year anyway, the last time Toyota used a new transmission in the Camry, they had problems.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    And man, what a mistake it was for Toyota to allow Peter Schreyer to go to H/K.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      This Camry with the Optima’s sheet metal and fascia would be quite the car. Instead we get the choice of a small baleen whale or a robotic nightmare. Interesting quote from Schreyer about the corporate Kia grill that was nicknamed “Tiger” at some point: “Tigers are powerful, yet kind of friendly”.

      Designers.

  • avatar
    noneuimport

    This car is not even out, and it looks dated already.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      It’s not very photogenic, but looked great on the floor of the NAIAS.

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        This is the problem with contemporary(I’d say ‘modern,’ but ‘modern’ design is a distinct entity and is of it’s own era) designs. They’re only fresh for a moment, and that moment lasts about 30 seconds in 2017.

        The 2018 Camry will be super stale by 2023 whenever stylistically-boring ‘legacy’ cars like the Chryslers or Buicks will still be boring– but won’t look dated.

        It’s a really hard balance to find, the one between modernity and classicism.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I actually like the look of this new Camry, particularly the well optioned ones with some more interesting exterior visual cues. Maybe I might be wrong but for $35K, you get the top V6 model AND there are still several option packages to tack on?? So you are probably looking at a fully loaded Camry topping $40K. Seems rather excessive. If you are going to up the price by $3000 should really have essentially loaded at the V6 level.

    I have never owned a Camry, but found the last couple of Camrys I test drove to be rather drab, ordinary and even cheap on the interior. For top dollar, hopefully they have well crafted interior as well. Will definitely check this out next time I am in the market. 300 hp at $35k is still relatively cheap speed these days, and if you are looking for normally aspirated family haulers in sedan form with 300 or more hp, your options are dwindling quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      From what I have read on the other articles today the $35K for the XSE V6 includes the panoramic sunroof, heads up display, JBL stereo system and the 8 inch screen. Those add worth thousands if so inclined. Seems like the V6 is a $2K-3K option by itself.
      I assume the red leather choice is a “free” choice on the XSE – that has value to some people.

      • 0 avatar
        tnk479

        And given how commodity sedans are selling, I would not be shocked if you can get it for 10% off MSRP. It would be hard to pay nearly 36k for a V-6 Camry when Truecar shows I can get an A4 Premium Plus with a couple of packages for 42 and change. Given the A4 is turbocharged and with the 7-speed DCT, the acceleration numbers are probably comparable.

    • 0 avatar
      stodge

      “to be rather very drab, very ordinary and even very cheap on the interior”

      Fixed that for you. :)

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    Pretty big price delta on the V6 models. I’m sure they will sell for less, but for that price you start getting into base Avalon/ES 350 territory. I bought my Avalon in 2015 (base XLE-didn’t want sunroof) for the same price they were wanting for V6 XLEs. I felt you got a lot more car for similar or less money. Plus, I love those 2GR-FE engines (the reason I got the 16 Sienna vs 17).

  • avatar
    a5ehren

    Are there any power numbers out for the hybrid version?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I don’t hear anyone applauding the side visibility of this car. It seems to have the low beltline and tall windows that everyone whined they wanted.

    I’m starting to like this Camry the more I look at it, although I’m still not yet sold on the SE / XSE’s front fascia.

    • 0 avatar
      2drsedanman

      “I don’t hear anyone applauding the side visibility of this car”

      I have to think this is a big draw for people who buy Subarus and pickups. Of course, my van has excellent visibility, but no one is lining up to buy these anymore.

      Overall, I like the looks. That blue color in the pic above is a welcome site in the world of grey/black/white cars nowadays.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      Great point. No need for a periscope on this new Camry. MB and Infiniti should take a look at this design.

  • avatar
    zip89123

    She’s just a beautiful girl dressed up in rags. A more conservative body could do wonders for the Camry.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    This thing looks great to me. I can’t wait to get into a rental 2018 at some point. 50mpg on a mid-size hybrid, that’s unbelievable.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Once again Chevy is left in the dust. The Malibu essentially matched the fuel efficiency of the existing accord and Camry, oblivious to the fact that their replacements will be even more fuel efficient. When will GM learn? Look for the Camry to gain even more market share, despite the hideous looks.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      It is true that the Camry is not classically beautiful like a Mazda 6 or conservatively handsome like a Passat or Accord (until the very recent update). But if Honda can sell lots of the current Gen Civic then looks are not everything!

  • avatar
    notsure

    Looks retro like a Godzilla/Rodan/Mysterians movie to me.

  • avatar
    mchan1

    The normal 4 cyl-equipped Camry’s fuel economy finally caught up to those of the Altima/Accord which came out some Years ago.

    The newer model looks good except for the front grille!
    Why can’t Toyota hire some designers to make its vehicles less ugly especially the front grille section? The ugliness started at the Lexus level then went down to the Toyota level.

    The base L will probably appeal to the fuel efficient crowd while the LE should be the bread and butter of the Camry sales.

    I’d consider a Camry LE if I was looking for a newer vehicle esp. with it’s newer, more fuel efficient engine. The hybrid version is worth considering if it weren’t for the higher price.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Question I have now is: What becomes of the Prius? What benefit does the Prius have over the Camry hybrid, besides more cargo room, slightly better gas mileage, and the opportunity to drive the same car as Mr. Dink from Doug?

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      The Prius has more cargo room than the Camry?

      I don’t think so.

      The current and previous generation Prius got smaller than the 05-09 generation, both for passengers and for overall interior space.

      I sincerely doubt the current Prius has more cargo room than the new Camry hybrid.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        The Prius has double the cargo space of the Camry Hybrid.

        • 0 avatar
          onyxtape

          Hatchbacks always surprise me with their cargo room.

          One time I sold an old 60″ DSP TV on Craigslist (looks like a flat panel but still has almost a foot worth of depth) and the guy came and picked it up in a mid-90s Integra hatchback.

          No way is that thing going to fit in the trunk or backseat of a Camry then or now.

  • avatar
    zip89123

    The latest thing I’ve read about the Camry, from Edmunds, is that factory NAV won’t be available on 4-cyl models. If true, that’s a dumb move on Toyota’s part to expect buyers to use Scout & apps for smartphone NAV. Traditional buyers looking for factory NAV will flock elsewhere if they don’t want to pay a $6000 premium for a V6.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Jeebus, that’s a lot of Hybrid MPG. Hopefully not accomplished by dialing down the power knob.

    Also, what’s wrong with color? The sexiest thing about Camry is it’s offered in 50 shades of gray. (OK, literally 7 shades of grayscale, plus red and blue.)


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