By on June 21, 2017

2018 ford expedition fx4, Image: Ford Motor Co.

You’ll have to shell out a fair bit of extra cash to get into a 2018 Ford Expedition, as the completely redesigned full-size SUV now carries an entry price above the $50,000 marker. Ford has to pay for that aluminum body, you know.

Of course, buyers aren’t just receiving a lighter body and long-overdue styling update. More standard features and considerably more power comes as part of the package, as well as the return of an off-road package that disappeared as an option years ago. As buyers move up the trim scale, they’ll soon discover the price gap between 2017 and 2018 Expedition models only grows larger.

Ford’s 2018 Expedition pricing structure, revealed by CarsDirect and confirmed by a company spokesman, starts at $52,890 after destination. That’s $4,570 higher than last year’s XLT model. Should you want more room between the liftgate and rear seat, an Expedition MAX, which replaces the long-wheelbase EL model, carries a sticker of $55,580. The longer XLT Expedition sees a $4,550 price bump over the 2017 version.

Should all-wheel drive be a necessity, tack on roughly $3,000 to either price. While 2018 pricing for the Expedition’s chief rival, the Chevrolet Suburban, remains unknown, the base 2017 LS version of that long-wheelbase, full-size SUV retails for $51,210 after destination. The two Detroit rivals share the same ballpark, though the Suburban now appears the value leader — especially in higher trims.

New for 2018 is an off-road-focused FX4 model that uses an XLT 4×4 model as its launching point. In order to get those skid plates, upgraded shocks, an electronic limited-slip rear differential and off-road tires, you’ll first have to add the 202A equipment package to the XLT 4×4, then add the FX4 package. All told, the most rugged of Expeditions costs $63,155.

What will an Expedition Limited set you back? In standard wheelbase guise, buyers of the 2018 model will pay $6,540 more for the Limited, which retails for $63,780, compared to last year. For MAX models, the price gap grows an extra $135. Keep in mind that lower trims all gain a 10-speed automatic and a newly upgraded 3.5-liter EcoBoost V6 good for 375 hp and 470 lb-ft of torque.

Platinum buyers — the crowd that wants it all — stand to see the largest increase. They’ll also see more power from the EcoBoost V6, to the tune of 400 hp and 480 lb-ft. For top-spec Expeditions, 2018 prices push the trim to $73,905 after destination, an increase of $8,505. Long-wheelbase lovers can expect to pay $76,595 for an Expedition Platinum MAX, or $8,540 more than last year. Sitting at the top of the price heap is the Expedition Platinum MAX 4×4 which, after destination, demands the handing over of $79,740. That’s $8,650 more than 2017.

It’s at this upper range where the Ford and GM rivals diverge. While the top-flight Expedition nearly touches $80,000, Chevrolet’s most luxury-laden Suburban doesn’t quite reach the $70,000 barrier. In fact, a loaded Expedition will cost you more than a de-optioned 2017 Cadillac Escalade in either wheelbase length.

Decision time awaits.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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73 Comments on “2018 Ford Expedition Pricing Revealed; Base Model Pushes Well Above 50 Big Ones...”


  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    Hmmm, itty bitty baller rims.

  • avatar
    zip89123

    After dropping more than 1% yesterday, Ford stock is down another 2 cents today. Investors aren’t happy about these overpriced Ford’s and stockholders are bailing. GM continues to clean Ford’s clock.

  • avatar
    salomervich

    The main issue is that a quick search on AutoTrader shows brand new 2017 Expeditions for less than 26k. Is ford ready to discount the hell out of them? or to see the volume drop off a cliff?

    http://www.autotrader.com/cars-for-sale/vehicledetails.xhtml?listingId=442439139&zip=91902&referrer=%2Fcars-for-sale%2Fsearchresults.xhtml%3Fzip%3D91902%26showcaseOwnerId%3D0%26listingTypes%3Dnew%26startYear%3D2017%26sortBy%3DderivedpriceASC%26incremental%3Dall%26firstRecord%3D0%26endYear%3D2017%26modelCodeList%3DEXPEDI%26makeCodeList%3DFORD%26searchRadius%3D0&listingTypes=new&startYear=2017&numRecords=25&firstRecord=0&endYear=2017&modelCodeList=EXPEDI&makeCodeList=FORD&searchRadius=0&makeCode1=FORD&modelCode1=EXPEDI

  • avatar

    I like the new Navigator. But the new Expedition looks kind of frumpy. Don’t like the grille at all, and who the hell is going to take an Expedition off road? The prices are rather frightening as well.

  • avatar
    ajla

    No one cares about the Expedition. How much is the Yacht Club Navigator?

  • avatar
    jh26036

    I can see $10k on the hood of these by month 3 of release. That’s the only way to sell American trucks these days.

    • 0 avatar
      Sgt Beavis

      The pickup truck and large SUV “markets” are not the same. Go look at the incentives on the Tahoe. It’s only $2000. That’s a design that has been out for over two years and it has incentives that are much smaller than many cheaper cars.

      There is nothing but profit margins in there.

  • avatar
    JimBot

    Can people actually afford these? I don’t get it.

  • avatar
    Wunsch

    The fact that the top trim is priced well above a Chevy makes some sense, I would think. Ford doesn’t have Mercury anymore, so this has to compete with the Yukon and its Denali trim too.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    They should have just called it the “Country Squire”, because that’s what it is.

  • avatar
    EX35

    this thing is going to cost in excess of $70K decently equipped.

  • avatar
    srh

    Wow. I never thought I’d be one of those “In my day” guys, but my dad paid $13,000 for a 1986 GMC Suburban. 4WD, an aux heater, and nothing else, back in the day.

    I mean, I’m not expecting to find a base Expedition for that price today, but I would have expected a premium of maybe $5K over a F-150, for the extra sheet metal and interior what-nots.

    Oh well, I wasn’t in the market anyway.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Buyer must love them or something. $10,000 more than the similarly equipped F-150 crew cab and $10,000 less “resale” than the F-150 in 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Hard to beat a big SUV for long road trips if there is some towing and/or offroad driving involved. Better rear passenger comfort vs a typical crew cab truck owing to the ability to recline the seat back to a comfortable angle. If you’ve got dogs to haul they’re in a cool environment while kept separate from passengers.

  • avatar
    TW5

    Welcome to CAFE 2025. This is just the beginning of the price hikes, and the terrorization of popular segments like body-on-frame SUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      You are absolutely correct – we are going to have to pay greatly inflated prices to get anything that isn’t CAFE friendly going forward. Otherwise people might not make the “correct” choice.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I really hope Ford fixes the quality of the interior for the 2018 model over the existing one. Especially for those ridiculous prices.

    The quoted prices will get you into superior alternatives as the Suburban isn’t it’s only competitor.

    As I’ve mentioned in the past, it will fail as an off roader. A 200 Series or new Patrol is cheaper, has superior quality and will off road to places an Expedition can only dream of.

    Ford really needs to look at the overheating issues of the EB in hot conditions. It would be interesting to see how many EBs encountered overheating in the SW with those high temps this week, especially SoCal, Arizona and Nevada.

    I do like the power of the EcoThirst on the highway, but luckily I’m not putting in the fuel.

    They are relatively comfortable to drive and as a passenger. Again, take a ride in an Aussie spec V8 Patrol and at $67k AUD, it’s a handsdown winner.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      The interior is MUCH better. The current Expedition and Navigator can’t hide their ancient bones under the 2015 refresh. They aren’t bad vehicles, they just had to sell for way less than the GM full size SUVs. The new Expedition is actually a step (or a few steps) above an F150 of similar trim level.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Adam,
        I’d be interested to look at a new one. A while back you and I discussed Expeditions. Hence my particular current interest in them (we have a small fleet of them at work, with new F150s).

        I can see their appeal, but they are expensive.

        I’m serious about their (EBs) ability in high temp environments, especially where I’m currently working. Temps are averaging 110 – 120 everyday. It’ll be this way until the end of August.

        V6 Kia Sorentoes are not having a good time either. The 2.7 gas Hiluxes just keep on going and a Mitsubishi Triton pickup. I’ll change my view of them.

    • 0 avatar
      shane_the_ee

      *IF* your use case involves transporting no more than 7 people sans stuff, then yes, the Armada/Patrol is the better option. I’ve got 4 kids and for playing in the mountains (my use case), the longer wheel base versions of either the Ford or the Chevrolet are just better choices. Sure, we could get a roof rack and a hitch rack and make a Patrol work, but we’re not doing rock crawling or mud bogging. Just crappy forest service “roads” where we might need to park the thing on some rocks or come across the occasional washout. And the FX4/Z71 packages are “good enough” for that.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “As I’ve mentioned in the past, it will fail as an off roader. A 200 Series or new Patrol is cheaper, has superior quality and will off road to places an Expedition can only dream of.”

      LOL. You’re something else. If you think anyone is taking their $85,000 Land Cruiser off-road either please share what you’re smoking.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Plenty of people in other countries do. Albeit in some countries just driving to work is easily within the realm of what we consider severe use and offroading in the US.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          gte,
          Thanks.

          I even used my BT50 off road since new. With all the mods it now has cost me around $53 000 AUD or around $40 000 USD.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          other countries have more variants of the Land Cruiser than is sold here, which start out a lot cheaper than the sole $85,000 version which is sold here.

          Besides, the Expedition is very much a North America-specific vehicle, so what people in other countries supposedly do with their Land Cruisers is irrelevant.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            JimZ the first time I saw a new facelifted ’16 Land Cruiser 200, it was rolling down my grandma’s potholed village street in Siberia. It’s a stark dichotomy of haves and have nots over there, and the haves all drive LC200s, LX570s, Prado 150s, GX470/460, etc. The roads are crap, anyone that has money never so much as considers something like an X5 or S-class or whatever other German luxo-cruiser. They make a bee-line to the loaded up Toyota/Lexus 4x4s. Sure there are some imported lower end LC105s with the unpainted palstic bumpers, but the vast majority are indeed the luxury-trimmed ones that we likewise see in America. The only difference being that most of the 200s over there have the smaller and older 4.7L V8 or twin turbo diesel V8 motor rather than our big 5.7L 3UR (that’s reserved for the LX570).

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            gte,
            I would think the twin turbo 4.5 V8 diesels are quite popular.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            gte,
            Australia has some of those “black plastic” 200 Series. They are basically a GXL with steel rims and a vinyl floor.

            Government bodies are the main customer.

            70 Series wagons and troop carriers are bought by individuals, farmers, mines, etc as they are better and more rugged than a 200 Series.

            Oh, Land Rover are bringing out a 2019 midsize pickup. The engines discussed ranged from the supercharged V8 to the 2 litre 4 diesel. I’d bet on the Lion e litre V6 and 2 litre diesel.

            LR stated it will be pitted against the MB X Class.

        • 0 avatar
          joeaverage

          Are these international versions as “deluxe” inside as the North American versions?

          I don’t see the point of buying an SUV with a deluxe leather interior and fancy carpets and then off-roading it.

          I’d be much more interested in vinyl seats and rubber floor mats – even if in a “fancy” SUV. I have an acquaintance who has trashed the interior of a large domestic pickup truck – – – using it like a pickup truck. Carpets are covered in mud, seats are stained, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        JimZ,
        WTF?

        You’d better come Down Under for some enlightenment.

        Places are that remote you would want to have a new Landcruiser or 4×4 off road.

        We do have the hairdresser set like the US with SUVs and pickups that never see the dirt other than the shoulder.

        But for serios off road treks why would you increase risk by using a sh!tter 4×4?

        Reliabilty.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          what does this have to do with the Expedition? I don’t give a s*** about what goes on “Down Under,” the Expedition isn’t sold there. and The US doesn’t have the lower-spec Land Cruisers like .au does. There’s a sole $85,000 model on sale in the US and I can virtually guarantee you no one who owns one is going to take their expensive truck off road.

        • 0 avatar
          shane_the_ee

          Because most of us in the US don’t do serious off-road treks. Our off road adventures usually consist of things like the Rubicon Trail, which is a whopping 22 miles long. We don’t need to carry 10 days of provisions (including water) and spare parts to go 22 miles. Nobody is using Expeditions and Suburbans for stuff like that; we use Jeep Wranglers and Toyota 4Runners and the like. Down Under (and I’ve lived there), “off roading” consists of multi-day/week treks covering hundreds or thousands of miles. Yeah, you need something bigger and more reliable than a Wrangler for that. We do have a few folks that do those sorts of adventures here. They’re the niche that drops $80k on a Land Cruiser because they need the capability. The Patrol’s only been available for a few months here and the aftermarket support for winches and bumpers and racks and such isn’t there yet…

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            shane,
            It’s not just size and off road. There is quality. I understand an Expedition if you have 5 kids.

            The Patrol is not that much smaller.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Something like 95% of the USA land mass is privately owned. You aren’t going to see much in the way of long off road trips because of that. Specialized off-road vehicles appropriate to the locale is more typical than long distance overlanders.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou,
            Australia is no different than the US with land ownership.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Oh you wacky Australians always out on safari! Doesn’t anyone work down there??

          The truth about Aussies is 90% live 60 miles or less from an ocean, most never seeing worse a washboard dirt road.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    The American Consumer continues to keep Ford, GM and FCA afloat by buying large, very high margin land yachts and pickups.

    I can see the appeal of one of these if you 1) have the cash, 2) have people and or cargo to fill it 3) require significant towing ability.

    Likely, most buyers will only check the first box. The interesting thing though is that as large as these monsters are….. steel, rubber, cloth, leather, glass is not in itself exceedingly expensive. I suspect a Ford Escape can be had with nearly the same features sans 2 cylinders and interior volume. I submit to you that the development costs for tooling, components is not significantly higher in supersize dimensions.

    So you are essentially paying an extra $40k or more for 2000 lbs of metal, glass, rubber, leather, cloth, etc that probably cost Ford $2000. On paper anyway.

    What you are actually paying for is Ford’s development costs across its entire vehicle lineup, generous UAW wages/benefits, fat executive salaries and Ford family shareholder dividends.

    If you have the money and don’t mind buying a vehicle that is not worth the sum of its parts to support all of these things, more power to you. The Ford family and all its employees thank you. I suppose I should too, we wouldn’t have an auto industry if it weren’t for all the people willing to part with way too much money for SIZE and not much else. Since I like buying reasonably priced and reasonably sized cars, perhaps I am the ultimate beneficiary for all your generosity.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    Real question re. the GMC comparison …

    Having never been in either, is the Platinum-trim Expedition comparable in “luxo” to the Escalade?

    I’d assume so, given how high-trim Fords tend to be, and how they basically make Lincoln pointless?

  • avatar
    sportsuburbangt

    I hope Ford figured out how to make the paint stick to the aluminum and not have the aluminum panels corrode/bubble under the paint.

    I have a 2012 Expedition with 50k on it that has corrosion bubbles on the tailgate and hood. The metal panels are fine. Ford does not warranty those engineering defects after 3 years.

    If I’m spending $50k to $80k on a vehicle I expect the paint to last for 5-9 years. We are paying for those amortized engineering costs…….

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I see this extensive aluminum corrosion on a lot of Expedition hoods and tailgates. Quite unsightly. Makes me wonder a bit about the new Aluminum F150s…

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    So can we stop griping that GM BOF SUVs are “overpriced?”

    …while 2018 pricing for the Expedition’s chief rival, the Chevrolet Suburban, remains unknown, the base 2017 LS version of that long-wheelbase, full-size SUV retails for $51,210 after destination. The two Detroit rivals share the same ballpark, though the Suburban now appears the value leader — especially in higher trims…

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      It was dumb for people to call them overpriced in the first place. They are just stuck in the “I ‘member when the most expensive Suburban was $33K” frame of mind.

  • avatar
    AVT

    Some things to consider. A Toyota Sequoia Platinum tops out at 65k. Nissan Armada slightly more around 66 to 67. A land cruiser is slighly more than 80k (not a competitor i know, but still thats pricing is astonishing). Granted they don’t have the same space as the MAXX version, but I would like an explanation of why this vehicle in top tiers is priced almost 10 grand more than the competition. Which now makes me want to know, where is the new navigator L going to top out at? And would you drop that much coin on one instead of an escalade? At this price point, I am finding it hard to justify the lincoln navigators continuation. What I really want to know is what are the residuals going to be on it after 2 or 3 years? Because if this pricing structure results in pretty immediate discounting right out the door, those resale values will sink like a stone.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    If the Expedition Platinum is $73k, then the Navigator is going to be priced competitively with the Escalade and not undercut it.

    I think the Expedition will do fine with discounts and haggling. I doubt many people will pay $90k for a moderately optioned Navigator and surely won’t pay $100k for a loaded Navigator L Reserve when they can get a Platinum Escalade ESV for that kinda coin.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      I believe the 2018 Navigator starts at $72K. For reference, the 2017 starts at $63k, so a significant bump on the Lincoln side as well. At least the Navi appears to be amazeballs.

      • 0 avatar
        Spartan

        It does look great. I’m not sure it’s enough to get people out of their Escalades yet though, especially without a V8 option.

        • 0 avatar
          SaulTigh

          At least in my neck of the woods, Escalades aren’t as popular as Denalis, which also come with the 6.2L. Not denying the GM will sound better, but if the driveability is good with the Ford, everyone will love the power.

          • 0 avatar
            Spartan

            Funny you say that because it’s the same here. In fact, I own a Yukon XL Denali. We didn’t want the Escalade because of the bling factor and the $25k price difference between the Yukon XL Denali and an Escalade ESV premium.

            I will say that I prefer the 6.2L V8 to the EcoBoost 3.5L. I had an F-150 before the Yukon.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Most Ford and Lincoln vehicles are vastly overpriced, unreliable POSs with horrendous dealerships selling and servicing those same piles of sh!t, to add insult to injury.

    This 50k let alone 60k let alone 70k Expedition is a bad joke of a vehicle, but then again, mist people are fOcking morons who will choke on as much credit rope as you will lend them and can’t rationally articulate what separates good vehicles from bad vehicles if a gun was put to their head.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Wow, classy styling… the new Ford Extinction looks expensive!

    Oh…that’s because it is.

  • avatar
    DownUnder2014

    I know it is probably just me, but the Expedition styling seems to have some resemblances to the GM twins…


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