By on May 19, 2017

1991 Pontiac Trans Sport, Images: RM Auctions, Inc.

Those of you who follow my Questions of the Day (so, 100 percent of the B&B) may notice I’ve been on a bit of a nostalgia kick lately. Asking you about your formative driving experiences or your first-ever car ride has generated some great stories. We all have old memories locked away in the memory vault, so we may as well drag them out and dust off a few.

My question today is about your teen years. More specifically, the high school ones. Such a variegated parking lot of treasures, rust, and Best Buy sound systems. Which ride sank to the bottom of the barrel as the worst in your high school parking lot?

The Ford business coupés, malaise rectangles or teal boxes of your youth (depending on your generation) that sat sweltering in the sun until the mid-afternoon exodus five days out of the week. I know you remember. Vehicles of varying quality, gifted by dad or bought with hard-earned savings from behind a greasy grille.

Having the right car can add substantially to your coolness, which is undoubtedly one of the most important things in life when you’re between the ages of 14 and 18. I didn’t have the right car was nearly famous, as I was in a five-cylinder, light blue Audi 5000 S built in 1987.

However, our examples today should be the wrong cars. And I don’t want any of you to say the Trans Sport above is an example of uncool, because it’s awesome, and could only be better if it were an Oldsmobile Silhouette. Fact.

My uncool memory comes from the brand with the red arrowhead, though, and it was even the same color.

Image: Pontiac Grand Prix

This is a pretty close facsimile of the biggest piece of crap in my high school parking lot. A circa 2000 Pontiac Grand Prix (just a couple of years old at that time). The owner had put $50 plastic spinners on the wheels, tinted all the windows black, and added numerous go-fast glue-on accoutrements from Autozone. Underneath the car, red neon lights and a loud exhaust completed the package.

The owner of this glorious motorcar would arrive at school 15 to 20 minutes early every day, park at an angle in the back of the parking lot (taking up two spaces), and blast his poor taste in rap music through the aftermarket speakers at maximum bass. You could hear the car vibrating from across the lot, and the owner would brag in class that his “…system is so loud it vibrates the buttons out of the dash!” Our lockers were near one another, as our last names were close alphabetically. I heard about this Pontiac often, which made it even worse.

Undoubtedly, it was the worst car in my high school’s lot, simply because of what the owner had done to it. Let’s hear your stories about the worst heap in your high school lot.

[Image: RM Auctions, Inc.; roadsmile.com]

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161 Comments on “QOTD: What was the Worst Car at Your High School?...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    there were a few and I can’t decide which was the worst.

    – The guy who had the “Ketchup & Mustard” Chevette which was a faded red car with yellow doors on one side

    – The guy with the ’78 Dodge Magnum which had one of the rear leaf spring mounts punch through the trunk floor

    – The kid with this 50% primer Fairmont sedan which was worth maybe $300 back then, yet he had wheels which probably cost $300 each. they were probably fenced. Worse yet, this was the early ’90s when there was a brief trend of having small but wide wheels on your car which stuck way out from the wheelwell, with rubber band tires on them. kind of the inverse of a donk. it let you look ridiculous and destroy your wheel bearings in short order.

    edit: forgot to mention, since I was in Auto Shop class my junior and senior years, I had the “privilege” of working on some of these pieces of junk.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      Such nice cars you lot had. In Australia in 1990, the cars in the lot were much more basic, Datsun 120Ys, Datsun 200B, Isuzu Bellet (brake drums the size of shoe polish tins), Vauxhall Victor, Renault 12…

      The worst was probably one boy who had a 1956 Ford Prefect utility – mechanical brakes, perimeter frame (like an Austin 7), wooden floor, sidevalve engine, live axle and cart springs at the back, dummy axle and cart springs at the front and 3 speed crashbox with a rock hard coil spring clutch. They made them in New Zealand until 1973…

    • 0 avatar
      ptschett

      Man, I’d totally blanked that era of the tiny / wide / outward-offset wheels out of my memory. There was a blue Tempo sedan in my hometown done up that way and it was hilariously bad.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Not the “worst” car in the high school parking lot but there was a guy with a Renault 5 (“Le Car”).

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      A Renault 5 “Le Car” was also the first lame HS ride I thought of. It was orange or yellow, and was a later model with that weird wrinkled dash. For whatever reason, I wound up parking next to it many times.

      Edit: I just remembered someone had a Honda 600. I didn’t learn what it was until years after I graduated. All I knew was that it was reeealy tiny.

      My memory regarding high school is fuzzy – we’re talking 1980 to ’83 here. My standout parking-lot memory was of a guy walking out to his car after school and offering a girl a ride home. As they approached his car, which had dulled paint but was in basically good condition, he apologized to the girl for driving such an old jalopy. And what exactly were his wheels? A ’69 Mustang. Yes kids, a first-gen Mustang was just an old used car once upon a time.

      My high school car park was also loaded with ’68-’72 GM A body coupes and hardtops (non-muscle-car versions). Old Chevelles and Le Mans were once quintessential cheap wheels or family hand-me-downs driven by high schoolers, like twelve year old Corollas are now.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      A lifeguard at my swimming club had a Le Car. It was a 5-door with a Webasto sunroof, and it looked to be in very good condition right up until it failed catastrophically in about 1985. Her brother was also a lifeguard. He drove a fintail Mercedes-Benz 190 with a stick-shift and no floors. Knowing very little about cars at the time, I thought both rides were pretty cool.

      As far as I’m concerned, there weren’t any uncool cars in high-school, just uncool people. There would have been no shame in driving a Ford Maverick with a 6-cylinder and an automatic that your parents bought for you at a used car lot, but it was hard to ignore having bought one with a giant hood scoop, chrome rims, a blacked out grill, and a grey paint job that looked to have been done with a roller for about fifteen times what I’d have paid for a Valiant with tired cosmetics and better mechanicals.

      Hand-me-down station wagons were great for going drinking in groups. Only their drivers hated them. There wasn’t much point in having a really good car, because I went to school in a left wing dystopia of a college town. Nice cars got keyed. Tires got flattened. The kids who did this stuff had their parents’ old Volvos, VWs or M-B diesels, and they didn’t take kindly to shiny sheet-metal unadorned by peeling old bumper-stickers. I knew kids who had more than one car, so they could keep one nice and sacrifice the other to the future campus radicals.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    My high school years were August 1991 to May 1995.

    I personally think it was a tie between one guy with a 1984 Camaro, Iron Duke and auto trans. Refrigerator white with black louvers on the back window. He thought he was sooooooooooooooooo cool. Another had a 1979 Buick Regal coupe with the base V6 and base interior. Would dare people to race him like it was a freaking Corvette or something.

    Pathetic cars made worse by pathetic owners.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    The kid with the 74 Firebird whose rear quarters had rotted out so badly, he replaced them with cardboard. Yes cardboard. He would replace after a few rainy days.. This went on for a couple of years and then the car was gone. I think the rest of it rusted away.

  • avatar
    rblue

    We had to do a stupid commercial for Mass Media class, so we used a football player’s old jalopy piece of crap. I almost broke a door off of it. I don’t even know what it was. It was small, had a roof rack, and the doors creaked and popped when you opened them…

    That football player ended up playing for the 49ers, and eventually ended up playing for the Cardinals during the Super Bowl, so I hope he was able to replace that giant turd.

  • avatar
    brawnychicken333

    High School from ’89-’93.

    My personal car was in the running for worst, but in hindsight it had a certain something. A 1980 Tercel-Corrolla-2 door sedan with a 3spd automatic. No AC, black vinyl, yellow exterior. Oh, and it was RWD-the last year Toyota exported a RWD small car.

    Also in the running was some kids 4 cylinder Fox body ‘Stang that was Pep Boys quality customized to look like a 5.0.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      The Corolla-Tercel (Tercel) was front wheel drive with a longitudinal mounted engine like a RWD car, so your belts are up front by the radiator and not on the side like a transverse application.

      I would have easily traded you my 1983 Tercel SR-5 4wd wagon (with EL gear, an extra low gear not normally used in everyday driving). It was blue with blue plaId interior.

      I hated it. There were cars that were more beat up than it was, but it was such a pile of junk, I claim prize as worst at my school. Aside from its refusal to start at times (never got that quite figured out), one day the 4WD locked in at speed and that led to an encounter with a large rock. I sold it for $250.

      Ironically, I love the 1982 and older Tercel. There was a guy with a white with black vinyl 1980 Corolla-Tercel coupe that I loved. I had tried to trade with him, but it was a no. Ha I also tried to trade it to a teacher for his Iron Duke Pontiac 6000 sedan. Nope.

      I’d make this one mine, sweet little hatch:
      https://sacramento.craigslist.org/cto/6087461181.html

      Maybe the 3Tc would be better to me in that one than the 1983 one was. And no 4wd to screw me up. Also, I imagine it would be quicker than the wagon, which struggled a lot to do 80, and would have better driving dynamics as the wagon felt top heavy (which I believe contributed to “the incident” that finally led me to dump it).

      • 0 avatar
        brawnychicken333

        With the 3 speed auto 80 was a stretch on flat ground. And no matter what, the car had a leisurely pace. Probably saved my 16 year old life.

        All this time I thought it was RWD. I just looked it up and you’re correct of course. My car fixation came later in life.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Yeah, I didn’t know when I had mine, I assumed it was RWD primarily with a front wheel drive system to make it 4wd.

          Other way around, haha.

  • avatar
    TeamInstinct

    Most of the kids at my high school seemed to have average to above average cars, but there were 3 that really seemed to stick out.. I went to high school 09-13

    – A slick first-gen Dodge Stratus that was painted sparkly neon snot green, complete with sweeeeet purple flames, a body-kit, and giant wing to really complete the package

    -A bright pink PT Cruiser

    -A Ford Aerostar that was drove by a teacher that was spray-painted school color’s, except the colors were so faded and flat they didn’t even look right.

  • avatar
    e30gator

    A guy I knew had bought an ’85 or so LTD Crown Vic at a police auction that was actually a beautifully cared for and maintained example (it was a Lieutenant’s car).

    He promptly ruined it by getting a cheap $200 Maaco paint job (black with plenty of overspray and streaks), punching holes through the exhaust pipe and cat to make it loud, spray painted the black steelies to make them appear chrome, and tacked on every piece of plastic crap from Autozone he could find.

    It looked like the bastard child of the Men in Black car and the parade float from Animal House.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I’ll just annoy Corey, break the rules, and name the coolest car at my high school: a ’65 Corvette Stingray convertible, with fuel injection, in fornicate-with-me red. I’d have donated about 22% of my left testicle for one day in that ‘Vette. But the kid who had it hooned it mercilessly, and even used it once to mow down mailboxes with while I got stuck in my mom’s ’75 Olds wagon. A-hole.

    I knew another kid with a triple-black ’67 Riviera GS with the 430, buckets and the basket handle shifter. Man, I loved that car.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    High school was 96-2000

    I don’t remember much.

    Worst car probably my friend’s 1st gen Cavalier
    Runner up bad car, this kid’s Dodge Aries with two 12s in the back
    Best car, some rich kid with a brand new Expedition

  • avatar
    Car Guy

    Year was 1987. A guy had a beat up late 70’s Cutlass with rear air shocks. You could tell when there was some air in the thing and the car had this strange tilt to it. They must have leaked quickly because it seemed to back on the jounce bumpers by the next day. Looked so stupid.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Probably the first-generation Taurus that was painted up as the General Lee. The orange wasn’t dark enough, but he had the flag and 01 that looked pretty decent. I can’t remember if he got into the car through the window or the door.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    High School 1983-1987. Funny how those 1973-1977 Cutlass, Regal, Monte Carlo looked old to us, even though they were actually only 8-10 years old. Same for any Chevette, Granada, Pinto, or Fairmont. Several old beat up trucks too. When I graduated, my then girlfriend’s father bought a new full size Chevy truck. Since these trucks were made essentially unchanged from 1973-1987, I remember thinking how dated that truck was and why someone would buy it new.

    When my friend’s mom bought a new 1985 Monte Carlo SS, we all drooled over that thing.

    This Sunday, my son graduates from the same high school I graduated from 30 years ago. I think I will ask him which cars are now considered the worst. I just don’t think his generation cares about that sort of thing as much.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      I bet he will pick some Scions or something. Riced Civics.

    • 0 avatar
      uofsc93

      Same HS years as you, and driving around in that Pinto fearing we would incinerate the second we were rear ended on the way home.

    • 0 avatar
      cbrworm

      I was about the same years as you. Worst cars were probably Pintos and Mavericks. I remember riding (off-road) in the hatchback area of a Pinto that was only running on 3 cylinders. The floor was too hot to touch, I was pretty sure the car was going to spontaneously combust. At the time, the kids driving late 60’s and early 70’s monster Chryslers thought they were unfortunate – if only they still had those cars today. There was a kid who had a brand new Granada, he thought it was the worst car ever. It was actually pretty cool. It had the straight 6 and was dark gray with no badges.

      It’s funny to think of how many kids on any day would not be able to get their car running to drive home. I don’t suspect that happens much anymore.

  • avatar
    Oreguy

    My car as a sophomore in 1983. Orange 1975 Mercury Bobcat EXACTLY like the one in this picture. It had the 2.8L Cologne V6 though, so it was kind of quick.

    …as compared to other Pintos, Civics, Corollas, and Chevettes of the era.

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/12/vintage-mercury-bobcat-ads-reveal-the-truth-about-life-in-the-seventies/

  • avatar
    christophervalle

    It was my friend Jerry’s 1970 Chevelle (not SS). It had a manual transmission that would lock up, requiring him to lay under the car on his back and get it unstuck. This was especially inconvenient in midwinter South Dakota. The aftermarket air suspension leaked, so the tires would sometimes scrape on the fenders, causing the raised white lettering to turn into a makeshift “whitewall”. One time the engine died about a block from his house. It had a relatively new battery, so instead of pushing it home, He shifted it into 1st gear, cranked the starter, then popped the clutch. The car would lurch forward about 4 feet at a time.

  • avatar
    mwgillespie

    Mid-70’s, Southwestern Ontario.

    New Triumph TR7. BRG, with requisite black racing stripes if I recall correctly. Started and ran from time to time, but it’s not like he could predict when.

    Depending on your point of view, that might also qualify as Best Car.

  • avatar
    raisingAnarchy

    Honestly, the worst car at my high school was probably my own. I didn’t know anything about cars and was relying on my stepdad to help me pick out a quality car. We turned down a seemingly flawless ’95 4runner stickshift w/ 160k miles for a ’94 automatic, really only because it had 100k miles. The ’94 was in way worse condition, as I would find out soon enough.

    Transmission started leaking, so my friends’ parents began to hate me when I came over and dripped red gear oil all over their driveway. Then the trans started slipping requiring an all new line after our epoxy patch didn’t hold.

    The brake lines failed on 3 separate occasions (the car spent all 14 years of its life in Ohio prior to my ownership), but the car ran pretty decent despite the rust, negligence (both my own and the prior owner(s)’s), and beating it received from my young male driving tendencies.

    I also installed an aftermarket radio and 2 subwoofers to maximize the number of rattles people would hear as I drove by.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    1967 to 1969. Mine was probably the worst – a 1960 Oldsmobile Dynamic 88 four-door sedan, copper top over beige. Looked like a middle-aged preacher’s car. 371 cu-in 2 bbl Hydramatic which was able to deliver pretty fair power but needed 2 quarts of oil every 100 to 150 miles (blow-by sent it right down the road draft tube at pretty high volumes in direct ratio to use of the accelerator) and delivered a startling 7 mpg in any driving. A very large vehicle with a very large rust hole in the drivers-side front fender where the water drain for the windshield vent grill was plugged with leaves and crap. It’d stall out in sharp right turns due to the problems with the carb and required me pretty much standing to crank the wheel when the power steering pump went dead. Two or three leaves of the passenger-side rear spring were broken during a stop-light drag race one night – I won but was leaving a trail of sparks with the rear bumper dragging on the road under full throttle. I learned that there were three bolts holding the tie rod to the passenger side front wheel; when two are missing and the third is on the last couple of threads the wheel flops like a crazy wheel at speeds over 40 mph. I did finally trade up to a 442 – a 1961 Renault Gordini with a 4 speed tranny, 4 doors and 2 wheel drive. Okay until the transaxle lube drained out and it totally locked up…

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Mine was a used-up 1978 Olds Cutlass Salon 2-door with a little rear fender and door rot, inherited from a chain-smoking aunt; upon receipt of the car, I had to remove two inches of cigarette ash from the floor area, and used the better part of a Costco-sized paper towel package, along with a half-gallon of window cleaner.

      Adding insult to injury was the neglected 260 Rocket V8, which, true to form, drank gas like a 455, but produced maybe as much power as the 231cid Buick 6s which were standard in the A-Bodies of the day, including the 1980 Cutlass and 1983 Regal sedans in which I learned to drive. (I can honestly say I grew up on these and their Century/Ciera brethren.) The final nail was the color, a rather un-masculine shade called “Pastel Blue” — see the “Complete Cutlass Chronicles” on the Curbside Classics site for a four-door example of the same car, down to the model year.

      Had I been thinking ahead past college, perhaps I would have squirreled the thing away somewhere until I could have done a complete frame-off with an engine rebuild and a replacement of the (likely) THM-200. As it is, if I could find a final-year Cutlass Supreme Brougham Sedan that hasn’t been donked, loaded with every conceivable option, including the 305 and AOD transmission, and only in need of a few thousand dollars of TLC to bring it to near-show quality, I’d grab it for a summer toy.

      My car wasn’t the worst: that honor goes to the Chevettes in various states of disrepair; at least the drivers were nice enough dudes.

      Coolest cars were the 2nd-Gen Prelude of a guy who went into law practice with his Dad, the hawt head cheerleader who drove an immaculate 1985 Trans Am (and who now runs a successful beauty parlor), and others that I’m sure I’m forgetting after 29 years.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “blast his poor taste in rap music through the aftermarket speakers at maximum bass.”

    So where did he stand on the whole East Coast vs West Coast thing?

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    The dude with the 80s mullet, gold chains, and the above mentioned 4-cyl Camaro with t-tops.

    My friend Plymouth TC3 was an abomination. It felt like junk even though it was only a few years old. It was a parent bought replacement for his 70s something LTD that began leaking gas.

    And my other friend with the yellow VW Rabbit that routinely didn’t start, unless you cranked on the engine for 2-3 minutes. He was an awful mechanic – you should have seen the job he did routing the transmission lines on my car! – and never figured out why his VW had starting issues.

    My own ’68 Firebird was a real piece of junk: rusted rear quarters, the windshield wipers didn’t work, the faded paint, and the non-matched tires were a dead giveaway to my teenage poverty. ie my parents didn’t buy me a nice car or give me a hand-me-down. Instead I got to borrow the ’84 Nissan truck only when my car was down for the count. At least the Firebird got _some_ cred because of the V8. It was a “project” car – yeah, that’s it! My mechanical skills were pretty bad in those days.

    Back then there were a lot of old muscle cars – at the time it was popular to jack up the back and put a chrome cover on the rear axle. Also to paint a logo on the trunk. One guy had a built Chevelle SS that said “In Your Dreams”.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      LOL I also had a friend with a TC3 (or whatever Plymouth called it that year, it went through about four names) – also an incredibly cheap-feeling car – and another friend with a yellow ’79 Rabbit. The guy with the Rabbit got married during the time I knew him and I was amongst the crowd tasked with decorating the car with “just married” paraphernalia. I happened to have with me a roll of yellow vinyl tape which exactly matched the paint color, which I used to redecorate the car some by running some across various black moldings on the outside and along the grey strip on the dash that would have been woodgrained on the top-line model, which the tape fit on perfectly since it was the same width. About three months later his wife asked me if I was the one who put the yellow tape on the car. They had just then noticed it.

      What I remember best about the TC3 was how the seats were much lower than in the 5-door Horizon but the cowl was the same height, leaving the non-tilting steering wheel at an obviously too high position.

      P.S. Why does the spell checker on this site flag “amongst” as misspelled?

  • avatar
    kefkafloyd

    My years were 1998-2002. The poor sap that had the X-body probably took the prize.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I just remembered, there was a chick in one of my classes with a Cimmiron. I think I just won the thread. She loved it, because it was her Cadillac.

      Ignorance is bliss?

      I mean, I might love a Tempo, but it is an honest, basic economy car and I have no delusions about it being greater than it is. Its greater than most commenters here give it credit for, but its still a 1980s stretched Escort that a healthy majority of which were sapped with a non-overdrive autotragic, combined with around 98 HP from an engine who’s bones probably predate its designer’s careers. It isn’t envy-worthy by most any account, however despite recognizing that, I still love it. Mine is not ignorance. Its just hard to understand haha.

  • avatar
    PV_Pathfinder

    1987-1991 at a slightly uppity catholic school… No shortage of nice, new cars in the lot. But there was one kid a year or two ahead of me that had a turd gold Yugo. To his credit, he would readily acknowledge “Yeah it’s a piece of sh#t, but it’s MY piece of sh#t!” He LOVED parking it next to whatever the newest car was in the lot. Gotta respect that.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    Going up 30-45 minutes from Flint, Lansing, and Detroit, I think the better question for me is, “What wasn’t the worst car?” The late 90s/early 00s were a dark time my friends. Maybe my friend’s Ford Tempo 4×4 was the worst. Another friend had a pretty terrible gray Lebaron too. Complete with the half landau. That has to be worse than the Tempo.

    Regardless, I miss blowing out speakers on various sh!tboxes while blasting Superunknown or Badmotorfinger.

    • 0 avatar
      Car Ramrod

      Why’d you have to go and make me sad about Chris Cornell all over again?

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        Sorry about that. Music has a way of transporting you back to a different time. Even more so over the last day.

        Wednesday night was the first Audioslave/Soundgarden/Chris Cornell concert in Detroit that I did not attend since prior to the formation of Audioslave. Sad news indeed.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    If we’re talking “worst”, it was also the most awesome: mid 80s A-body Celebrity white sedan with much missing paint (past primer), huge sub in the trunk, and wink wink inspection purchased for $100.

    If we’re talking saddest, I really can’t remember. Maybe this beat Omnihorizon which comes to mind, but overall there were several of those and wheels were wheels at the time.

    My personal fav was Brian T’s black 91 Townie his grandfather willed him. Oh and Frank S had a 92 or 93 whale Fleetwood his dad gave him when dad bought the final ’96 (Frank was physically very large and overweight like dad, prob couldn’t fit in much else at the time). Another friend, Chris S had a relatively new at the time Mitsu Montero, I can’t remember MY.

    My father, Mr I-was-gifted-a-69-Camaro-SS-in-late-1970-after-surviving-Vietnam, sought to embarrass me with what turned out to be the biggest POS 87 Dodge Shadow. Looked alright from the outside (no diff colored doors or anything), but you would not believe some of the things which broke on it. Sometimes I’m glad he’s dead.

  • avatar
    Jeff Weimer

    84-88 and it was a tie between my ’62 beetle and a teacher’s (he still teaches there and very successfully coaches football) TC3. Of course there was the ’79 Chevy wagon….

  • avatar
    JimC2

    This one happened after high school, but one of my friends put a ridiculous subwoofer in the trunk of an old Plymouth Reliant. It was fun to out-blast other ridiculous car stereos in city traffic and watch the looks on their faces as they looked around trying to figure out whose car was beating theirs. Well, this being in the salt belt, the sub would shake the rust off the car, much to our amusement. Eventually this resulted in a fuel leak, which was also quite amusing…

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      LOL, I tried installing a high-powered dash-mounted amp in a friend’s mid-’70s Granada once. We succeeded in blowing all four of the factory speakers before the amp went China Syndrome.

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    I was in high school 1996 to 2000. It was private so most of the cars were not cheap but a few were incredibly tacky.

    One kid got a brand new red Integra that he felt the need to paint yellow– poorly. He then totaled it, but don’t worry, his parents bought him a new Infiniti G20t.

    Worst car would have to be a brown and rusting 80’s Montero. The owner intentionally rolled it in the field behind the school, but with the help of about 4 people it was righted and started.

    Runner up: ’93 Camaro 3.4L in Teal. Iron Duke of its era.

    3rd Place: VW Cabrio. Pretty emasculating for the tough guy wannabe who drove it.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Are any of you even trying?

    I went to high school in Canada. Owning your own vehicle was rare. However in our ‘student parking area’ during my years there, we were subjected to and drove in Ford Cortinas, Pontiac Firenzas, Envoy Epics, and a plethora of clapped out, rusted out, you had to lift the doors in order to close them, you could see the road through the floorboards VW Beetles.

    If you were lucky enough to have a Vega, Pinto or Gremlin it was considered to be a nice car. I was lucky enough to originally have a Type III squareback/wagon/shooting brake, in blue, with zero options.

  • avatar
    Opus

    Not sure, but my rusted-out Brown ’64 Corvair came close. Stripped spark plug socket, leaked oil from somewhere (which the heater generously blew into the car!), brake line corrosion that let go one day downtown when I was following a box truck…

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    I can’t think of anything truly horrible (if your car was really awful, you just rode the bus). My Citation was down toward the bottom of the barrel, but there were plenty of malaise drabness to keep it company. I knew one girl with a Hyundai Excel which needed a quart of oil every week.

    • 0 avatar
      PV_Pathfinder

      I had a Citation as well. 1981’ish. Pale sparkle blue paint job. The only thing bigger than the giant dashboard that housed the vertical Delco, was the MAMMOTH bench seat up front. For 3 winters, the heat would reliably kick on when I drove over the last speed bump going into the parking lot.

  • avatar
    turf3

    1976-1980.

    My Vega was probably the worst. 4 years old, a quart of oil every 75 miles, and severe cancer rust all around the front and rear windows. In Texas. A 4 year old car.

    I went to a private school with the kids of some very wealthy people. A few of the kids had fancy new sports cars. Most of the students tended to look down on that behavior. The two guys whose families probably had the most money, one of them drove his mom’s 5 or 7 year old Pontiac sedan, and the other a 5 or 7 year old pickup truck. (And these were the days when a pickup truck was a truck, not a luxury sedan with a deck out back.)

    The nicest car was the doctor’s son’s who was given his dad’s early 60s Mercedes SL convertible. After damaging the top by trying to get it to go up (or down, don’t remember which) and prying on it with a crowbar, he had his folks replace it with a new Datsun 280ZX (in other words, a disco car). Everyone who was into cars was horrified. “You traded a 230SL for a disco chariot??”

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I had a ’75 base Hatchback (RPO L11 2-bbl, THM250 auto, a/c, and AM radio), two years old with 44k when I bought it at Frank Parra Chevrolet in Irving (paid $1895). It was a decent car (I drove it hard and abused the hell out of it), still very straight and rust-free. I only drove it for a year and put another 7k on it, trading it on a brand new ’78 Audi Fox.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    It was so long ago for me (40 years ago next year), that I don’t remember the truly awful ones. I did know one guy that drove a clapped out ’64 Valiant (Slant Six with pushbutton Torqueflite). He would manually downshift it using the buttons. There was another guy with a ratty Beetle. One that was truly awful *and* awesome at the same time was an early Ford Courier with a 302 and four-speed transplant. No hood on it, and Cragars shod with N50s on the back.

  • avatar
    rocketrodeo

    Brand new Fiat Strada. I’ll bet few people here have ever seen one. They were that bad. Sort of a pre-Yugo. It made my friend’s TR7 seem reliable.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      I remember the Strada (Ritmo for you Europeans). Extremely weird looking, especially compared to its predecessor, the three-box 131.

      • 0 avatar
        la834

        I thought it was a replacement for the three-box 128, although the 131 Brava disappeared around the same time. The Strada sold extremely poorly for the short time it was available, which along with slowing sales of its two aging sports cars prompted Fiat to leave the US market for the next several decades.

  • avatar
    chaparral

    Mine.

    An ’88 CRX that was so rusty that it failed the state inspection for not having enough good metal to attach any repairs to.

    The rear suspension mounting points tore out when I went over a set of railroad tracks. It went directly to the junkyard after that.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    Corey, you are confusing worst cars with worst people. That 2000 Grand Prix wasn’t a sh!tty car. It had a sh!tty owner.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    My high-school years were between 2007 and 2011. So, take that for what you will. Anyway, a girl in my class had an earlier BMW X3 that she’d clearly inherited from one of her parents. There was nothing wrong with the car; however, she used to terrorize other students with it by careening through the parking lot and nearly hitting them—I think she ran over a fellow cheerleader’s foot once—anytime she got in a fight with her boyfriend.

    I actually saw her on the road recently. She now drives a Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class with a personalized plate featuring her name. Naturally, I gave her a wide berth when I spotted her.

    As for cars which themselves were bad, a friend of mine had an early-90s F-150 whose floorpan had so many holes, you got a nice visual of the ground every time you rode in it.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    A Plymouth Cricket, unfortunately for me, it was mine.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      I had a friend in high school who was lucky enough to get a new Plymouth Cricket MT and it was one of the nicest cars in our school. However it was the Mitsu version, not the English (Rootes?) version.

  • avatar
    zamoti

    I had an 87 Yugo in smurf blue. People would pick it up and turn it sideways between teachers cars so I had to go find them and ask them to move so I could go home.
    It was slow, rusty, breaky, leaky and overheaty (sorry). The clutch slipped because my idiot older brother abused it before I got it attempting to do a burnout; he did do a burnout but it was the clutch that was burning out. It was also previously rear-ended and had open holes in the fenderwells that would spray water into the rear of the car. This in turn shorted out the rear speakers and most of the tail lights, turn signals and brake lights.
    It was sold to a kid two years younger than I as his first car; it was actively overheating at the time of purchase. A friend told me that it went straight home and was parked in the yard never to move again.

  • avatar
    tonyola

    I was in high school from 1969 to 1972. The nerdiest kid in the school (complete with coke-bottle eyeglasses and five-years-out-of-date Sears clothes) drove around in a pale blue Subaru 360.

  • avatar
    bultaco

    The years were 1976-1980 in Ohio. This was a time when ’60s muscle cars were just old cars that nobody but high school kids wanted. The crappiest car in my high school parking lot was some hillbilly kid’s ’69 Chevelle non-SS coupe. The rear suspension sagged so badly it looked like the trunk was full of engine blocks, and it had four mismatched tires on rusty steel wheels. It had once been red, but most of the paint had been tastefully replaced with rust and primer that looked like it had been applied with a mop. I’m pretty sure that the only electrical circuits in the car that worked were the ignition system and the starter, which was activated by a very James Bond-like Pep Boys horn button screwed to the ashtray, of all things. It was something of a “sleeper” though, as it was a 4-speed and had a hot small block in it. This didn’t elevate it from its bathyspheric level in the hierarchy of high school cars, though, because everything else about it was so utterly disgusting.

    The parking lot also contained an array of old muscle cars that would be worht a fortune today. My ’71 Firebird Formula, my buddy’s ’68 SS 396 convertible, a ’69 Z28 with the original DZ 302 still present, a ’68 Charger with a transplanted 440, and also lots of 1960s MGs, Truimphs, etc.

  • avatar
    arach

    The worst car in highschool was a BIKE.

    Yes, you can argue that there were a lot of really crappy cars, but even a crappy car was better than the lowly Bike Commuters.

    The worst car in highschool was definitely a bike.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      Yes this! And mine wasn’t even a cool bike, it was an old hand-me-down upright 3 speed back when 10-speed racing bikes or the early mountain bikes were the hip self-powered two-wheelers. I literally got laughed at once or twice by some bus riders who didn’t recognize their good fortune of living somewhere on the bus route. Still, I needed the extra 15 minutes of sleep I got by riding my bike instead of walking. Then in 11th grade I got a girlfriend who lived two blocks away, which resulted in me ditching my bike so I could walk to school with her. Somehow even walking to school seemed higher up the social ladder than riding a bike.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Nahh, the worst ride was very yellow, slow and quite large, filled with 40+ other hormonal teenagers (and younger) and a depressed, middle-aged driver.

      I didn’t bike to school, but had that been an option, I might’ve taken it over the cheese wagon. Hell, I was the 6th person (and the driver, before I got a license) to get in a Mercury Marquis sedan just to keep off that big yellow basГard.

      My best friend since high school sometimes says that I only dated my girlfriend because she had a car. I have been advised by counsel that it is not in my best interest to answer that. Ha!

  • avatar
    jack4x

    The worst car was my friends very used up ’89 Tempo (this was in 2001-2002). Rusted, something in the front suspension broken, such at least one of the tires would rub on the body, and no defroster so on -10* Minnesota mornings with ice/fogging on the windshield he would need to drive in with his window down and head hanging out. You could tell the temp outside by the number and length of icicles in his beard. Top speed of 55 mph kept him out of trouble at least.

    Honorable/dishonorable mention to the spoiled rich kid whose parents bought him a brand new Hummer H1 that he proceeded to drive around town like a complete a$$, running red lights, double parking everywhere etc.

  • avatar
    r129

    My high school years were 1996-2000. The worst car had to be a circa-1985 Chevy Celebrity wagon in turd brown with “Shaggin’ Wagon” spray painted on the side. On the rare occasions that I actually showed up to school, I felt pretty cool in my 1988 Merkur Scorpio.

  • avatar
    Thorshammer_gp

    Not too many cars stand out to me as particularly crappy, but the worst was probably a friend’s ’96 Cavalier where the entire bottom half of the body (doors, fenders, everything- minus the faded black plastic bumpers) had evaporated in various showers of rust. Of course, a close second (or first) would be the Plymouth Breeze that caught fire in the parking lot one day.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    My one friend had a really clean red Subaru Justy (fwd, stick shift, unpainted bumpers). One day some friends picked it up and put it in the parking lot median as a prank. But I was actually kind of jealous of that Justy, at least it was a stick shift unlike my own brown Civic Wagon (which I otherwise liked quite a bit!). There was also a 2nd gen Metro hatchback similarly in poverty spec trim. Honestly the most embarrassing vehicle was a brand new 2008 Compass that one girl’s dad bought her as a senior present, she thought it was really something else. That Compass for better or for worse was just about the only new vehicle in the parking lot aside from one guy that got a new ’07 Corolla LE, and another kid that got a brand new ’07 Passat 2.0T. The rest of it was rusty pickup trucks and older Accords/civics/corollas/camries, 240 volvos, various ilk of J/N/W body GM and minivans.

  • avatar
    7402

    High school in the mid seventies. There was a rusty, faded Mercedes 180D whose only redeeming feature was a column shift 4-speed. This was before diesels were cool, and it belched exhaust that would make today’s coal-rollers proud. We took it out out and tested 0-60 on a downhill onramp after several tries we finally got it down to 59 seconds.

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    Probably worst was a 1950 studebaker commander coupe, because no one wanted to drive a then-22 year old car.

    Until we grew up and realized what he had was a rather cool car after all. even in beige.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Funny how time can make how we look at a car change. Starts out great, then good, then okay, then rough but respectable, then junk nobody wants and if time is allowed, it’ll eventually come back all the way back around to great again (even if its only in your mind).

      There was a time people gladly traded decent 289 Mustangs for a Datsun B210. There were people who traded yard work for a 1970s Honda that an adult can barely fit in (you put it on like a pair of pants, I guess) that are worth their (admittedly light) weight in gold today. A rusty heap with a powertrain that hasn’t run since the Bush Sr. Administration is now worth thousands to a restorer (or someone who fancies himself one haha). Memories of a similar car from early adulthood on back can make a man spend unthinkable amounts of money and time in pursuit.

      Says the guy who drives and defends to the ends of the earth a car that he idealised when it was new 20+ years ago. Lol but we haven’t come close to unthinkable sums of money being spent…yet.

  • avatar
    TR4

    Graduated high school in 1972. Probably about 1/3 of seniors had cars. Mostly early ’60s Valiants, Chevy IIs, and Falcons. Mine was probably one of the worst (but different), a ’60 SAAB 93 although the auto shop teacher’s ’63 VW bus was a close second.

  • avatar
    rnc

    early 90’s

    Worst – The car I rode to school in for two years….the pumpkin, an early 80’s dodge (I believe) full size van, painted primer orange, no hub-caps and every seat was a different color. Friends car, parents well off, just didn’t believe in spoiling kids, everyone loved the thing.

    Best Car

    Mint XJ12 (a lot of nice cars, very wealthy public school, the XJ just stuck out for some reason)

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    These brand new LaFerrari and Range Rover Autobiography in the high school parking lots has to be the worst ever! LOL!

  • avatar
    TMA1

    He didn’t go to my school, but a friend of mine at work at and ’81 Olds 98 with the diesel engine. As this is the car that pretty much soured Americans on diesel engines for 30 years, you can imagine how terrible it was. Sounded like a school bus, it stank, and it diesel gas wasn’t very common in that area. He had to drive to truck stop to fuel up.

    Why he traded his awesome ’78 Berlinetta for that heap, I don’t know. I think it had some electrical gremlins in the headlights, but the trade for a diesel Oldsmobile wasn’t exactly an upgrade.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Don’t hate on my Ninety Eight.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        A Ninety-Eight diesel is NOT a Ninety-Eight.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          You just hate my beautiful black clouds of soot.

          Black Clouds Matter, dude.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            We should put a Duramax in a Diesel Ninety-Eight.

            Might as well make it a bad a§§ big diesel car.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @JohnT

            Didn’t Jay Leno Duramax an Oldsmobile?

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            @Dan, I have no idea. I got the idea from a Duramax-powered G body Monte Carlo I saw on YouTube many moons ago.

            There were two types of clouds pouring from the back when he stepped on it.

            That had to have been an early Duramax (tuned I’m sure) before they got in the hp/torque race with Ford and FCA-via-Cummins. I bet a newer Duramax would move a Ninety-Eight quite nicely.

            A very quick Google search “Jay Leno Duramax Oldsmobile” showed his twin-turbo V-8 Toronado with over 1,000 HP and a 1960s 88, but nothing about a Duramax Olds.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          Suckers to the side

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        @28 everybody hates on my Ninety-Eight desires. I don’t care, ha they SHALL SUBMIT TO THE COZY CONFINES OF AN RANSOM E. OLDSMOBILE PILLOW TOP INTERIOR, FEEL THAT GLORIOUS ROCKET UNDER THAT FOOTBALL-FIELD-SIZE HOOD and they will know that Oldsmobile *was* good.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          When I get the lotto money, there will be all sorts of Ninety Eights and it will be glorious. A 98 B-body limo, a turbo diesel, I think there was a RWD coupe at one time which will be LSx’d, an L32’d final year (essentially an LSS). The Olds will flow and it will beat the hell out of whatever Buick is these days.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Very nice. Don’t forget about your Olds-loving buds. I’ll take a 80-84 Ninety-Eight Regency Broughm coupe, please. Big block or an Olds 350 will be swapped in. I’ll even take a Delta 88 Coupe if I must.

            Must. Have. Pillow top.

            Speaking of such, I found a 1974 Cutlass Supreme with a 350 Oldsmobile engine that runs perfect, says the seller. I want the car for that engine to put in either a Delta 88 Coupe or a Ninety-Eight. He wants a grand for it.

            Its quite ugly (styling wise), I would not fix it up, its parts status only. It has flawless front clip and tail light housings, so someone who doesn’t find it as displeasing to look at as I do could score some awesome parts I imagine are becoming rarer by the minute.

            My fleet would be humongous if I had the funds to support it. Oldsmobile, Mercury, Pontiac and Plymouth (likely in that order) will be well represented aside from the many Blue Ovals as one would expect.

            Some Hondas (spanning 1970s-present), Datsuns and even some early Toyotas will be present. Maybe a classic British roadster with a bullet-proof BEV conversion. Nahh, I’ll just use a 1960s Datsun roadster and get a canary yellow “baby ‘Bird” roadster for my dad. He loves those.

            I wouldn’t go shopping at Barret Jackson (except maybe for dad’s T-Bird). I’d buy most of ’em off craigslist and then have guys who will build/restore them how *I* want them, ha.

            There may be several Tempos. Just fair warning.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Aww man
            https://montgomery.craigslist.org/cto/6141809105.html

            I wanna make it my baby.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Everyone needs a Sunday car.

            Make it so.

  • avatar
    Fred

    1968-1971 and the worst car was mine, a 1959 Ford Fairlane. I paid $100 for that pos. Learned my lesson and paid $400 for a 1963 Chevy Belair in my senior year.

  • avatar
    brettc

    The bass thing reminded me of “BASS BOY”, who drove a maroon, early 90s Grand Am. He was a little Indian guy and he thought his Grandma was pretty cool. I had an Indian friend in high school that kind of new the guy since it was a small Indian community in a mostly white city.

    He thought Bass Boy was pretty cool. He actually had a vinyl sticker on one of his windshields (can’t remember which end) that said “BASS BOY”. You could hear the car coming, and if that guy can hear anything today, I’d be shocked.

    And for those wondering, no, it didn’t have a Quad4.

  • avatar
    Chan

    As it is now, so it was back then.

    A Mustang, GT, probably automatic (no proof), doing donuts in the student lot. No idea who it was, but my years were 1997-2001.

    On the fancy side, I had a rich classmate who wrecked a B5 A4 early in our senior year (late 2000), and got it replaced with an S4. Then he got a WRX because the Audi was too fancy to bring to college.

  • avatar
    mknevada

    Back in the day..1974-1978 Chicago…Any car at all gave you some cool..I think I stretched it a bit with my $100.00 Gold Buick Skylark. The starter had to be gripped during use or it would fall thru the dash…The Vinyl was ripped, and the wind would pull it back so it would thump on the roof annoyingly. Periodically, I would have to give it a “Haircut” as the vinyl on the roof would continue to recede. Like many of our first cars, however, it had a no longer offered option…The “Safe delivery home while intoxicated ‘ feature
    Heavy Sigh….How I loved that car.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Man, I didn’t even have a car until after I graduated high school.

  • avatar
    bubbagump

    I eschewed autos my whole time in high school in favor of a Fuji S-10S (that’d be a 10-spd bike). Learned on my dad’s v-dub. In driver’s ed I spent the year by myself in a Vega ‘woody’ wagon as I was the only one that could do a stick. Liked that little car. Didn’t buy one of my own til after joining the army. A ’72 gold Malibu wagon that someone had shoe-horned a 454 V-8 into and put a Hurst 4 speed on the floor. Used to scare the crap outta me as the front end would get seriously light around 75 or so on the highway. Smoked my friend’s Ranchero every time though so at least there’s that.

  • avatar
    IllTakeAn8WithThatV

    My high school years were August 2003 – May 2007. A friend’s brother drove an early 90’s turquoise Mercury Capri. I think that is one of the worst from my memory. He and I gave each other a lot of flack for our respective high school cars, but all in good fun. I drove a family hand-me-down van, a 1999 Isuzu Oasis. I loved that thing.

  • avatar
    22_RE_Speedwagon

    AMC Pacer…

    or my brother’s Renault Alliance.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    79 – 82, walked to school in cheap shoes. Sometimes on weekends I got to drive moms 69 slant 6 Valient. Fortunately I was fit, smart, and friends with everyone so I had way more fun than was prudent. Worst car I temember was a California mark 1 Fiesta. Made my moms old wheels seem fast and lux.

  • avatar
    davew833

    In 1985 it might well have been my ’76 AMC Pacer. It started without a key and the driver’s side wing window was broken out so there was no way to lock it. My friends occasionally tried to steal it, but I never kept any gas in it so no one ever got far, including me. Even though the tires were all mismatched, it rode on imitation Cragar S/S chrome mag wheels, which were probably worth what I paid for the whole car.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Liking the many stories here .
    .
    I thought my battered $50 1960 VW Beetle was the worst car in High School, there were other beaters of course, mangled and barely running 1st. gen. Falcons and Comets, A body MoPars that simply refused to die and so on .
    .
    There was a large Low Rider club that could fill both sides of the street with bumper to bumper parked ’63 & ’64 full size Chevies during lunch, I always wondered where the hell they got that much money for the wild paint jobs, cragers, fur interiors and of course, the hydraulics .
    .
    Some jock had a very sweet ’55 Caddy Convertible, another Jock drunkard had a black & white Metropolitan Nash convertible with large ‘Bud Man’ stickers on the doors ~ it occasionally spent the night in front of the school .
    .
    My buddy bought a brown ’64 Buick two door sedan for $40 and ran it into the ground in a few months, he was always a car/moto killer .
    .
    Interesting times, mostly fun .
    .
    Lotta kids here ~ most of the vehicles mentioned weren’t even on the drawing boards when I was in School .
    .
    -Nate

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Northern Westchester NY mid-late 70’s. Think Dazed and Confused including many of the same vehicles. My high school parking lot consisted of everything from full and mid-sized GM cars. 73-77 GM Colonades were popular. The obligatory Dart/Valiant/Swinger/Scamp/Duster/Demon. Some Pintos, Mustang II’s and early Capri’s. A few Vega’s with replaced engines under warranty as well as Monza’s and Sunbird’s with the 262 V8.

    After the 1st gas crisis you started to see more Japanese cars. Corollas-the late 70’s shooting break/hatch, Datsun 510’s etc. People were also gravitating toward them because they had some bad prior experience with a domestic product. Some upper middle class folks would let their kid drive their W122/W123 Benz or Volvo to school. BMW’s were a rarity then though one teacher had a nice orange 2002.

    A friend of mine bought a clean Renault 10 for $50. He mounted a cassette deck under the dash, did some maintenance and was good to go. It ran fine for a couple of years. But the worst was a friends late 60’s VW Beetle. Bad floors, brakes that were so sketchy when going down hills he would have to pull up on the emergency brake. Myself A 1970 Mustang coupe served me well.

  • avatar
    cdrmike

    20 year old rust green LTD with a hole in the back floorboard. When you road in the back, you always got a bit light headed and had to make the driver keep moving to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning.

  • avatar
    matador

    There were two at my school:

    First, an old gray Nissan Stanza. This looked like your typical clunker- didn’t run smooth, exhaust so bad you could hear it blocks away. The math teacher owned it. He lived about 10 blocks from the school, so it was good enough for him for a couple years. It was better than the Chevrolet Celebrity that it replaced. In my senior year, he replaced it with a GMC pickup that didn’t look bad at all

    Second, there was a 1967 Impala coupe. This was owned by the sterotypical “do circles until I need new rear tires” idiot. He crashed it sideways into someone else’s car (That car wasn’t noteworthy- probably a Taurus or Lumina. There were tons of them). But, it was about 6 colors, never ran correctly, he bragged of how he got tires from the scrapyard (They weren’t good ones either), and the thing leaked so many fluids that the back seat looked like Tractor Supply, and there were a few cases where there was quick-dry over a space he parked in

  • avatar
    Zackman

    The worst car? Mine. Specifically, two cars: A rusted-out 1952 Chevy 216 babbitt-beater stick bought for $75.00 in August 1968 – my first car, only kept it for three months. Next, a 1961 Chevy Bel-Air 2 door sedan 235 stick bought in November 1968, almost equally rusted-out with a knocking rod.

    Both pieces of junk, no matter what I did to them.

    I did briefly have a 4-track tape cartridge player in the ’61 for a few months with two 6×9 speakers. Sounded good for its day in 1969.

    That car, after all I and my buddy did to it, including fixing the body and painting it Camaro Rallye Green, it threw a rod for my dad when I was in the USAF in January, 1970.

    Sold it to a guy later that spring after my friend dropped a 283 in it.

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    The Henry J…jacked up in the back w/ huge wheels and tires; missing the front bumper. That’s the only one I remember, as I rode the bus!! :-)

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Were those the ones with the “trunk” that was only accessible by folding down the rear seat? (In other words, no trunk lid, cheaper to manufacture that way evidently.)

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Stop the presses, I found Corey’s ultimate PLC Broughm: https://phoenix.craigslist.org/evl/cto/6138892516.html

    I bet bigAl approves. Just put some lacey spoke 1990s Crown Vic rims on it, a paint job and you’re done. Wasn’t someone asking, nee begging for some stacked-headlight beauty?

    I like the “burn your hands” metal chain steering wheel in phucking Arizona. Corey, a mahogany wood wheel is in order. Needs a FoMoCo Broughm crest-and-wreaths logo in the center.

    I’m a Ford guy, but I would rather set fire to that car than drive it or look at it.

  • avatar
    JustPassinThru

    Geez, I guess I’m a fossil. All the unkewel cars, the Chevettes, the Renault 5s, the Iron Duke ponycars…not around.

    The most unkewel car in my SMALL HS parking lot, was a 1969 Kaiser Dispatch 100. That’s right a Postal Jeep, prior to AM being hacked out of Kaiser Jeep and Kaiser General Products, the military/government contractor arm.

    It had the traditional, later-copyrighted CJ grille on it, and under the hood a Chevy II engine. Powerglide transmission. The owner paid $300 for it at the regional Post Office vehicle garage. It wasn’t worn out; the Postal Service was crossing over to the “new” Dispatchers with the AMC six and the bulged-out grille.

    Representative of what was in our lot: A 1965 Plymouth Belvedere, with a slick red stripe filling the character-line molding on both sides. A 1959 Ford Ranch Wagon two-door – in excellent condition. Paint dulled but no rust…since the owner drove it all winter, that wouldn’t continue.

    A Willys basket-weave wagon. A few old Gen1 Mustangs…the II had just hit the Ford lots, in those years. And a smattering of old Chevys, various years…the 1964 was twice represented. That was a popular year for it in my area.

    But then, in those years, few high school students had cars. My school had 2000 students; and about fifty of them drove to school.

  • avatar
    ptschett

    I graduated in 1999 from a private school in South Dakota.
    The worst car was probably the Chevette diesel/auto 5-door that one of the sophomore girls had when I was a senior.
    It wasn’t the only diesel in the lot though, one of the junior girls drove a mid-80’s BMW 524td.*
    I had one of the oldest cars with my ’73 Mercury Cougar till I got my ’96 Ford Thunderbird in senior year and then had one of the newest cars (and my sister then got to drive the Cougar.) The oldest car belonged to a friend of mine, he had his dad’s ’67 Chevy C10 pickup (brown, 4×2, 6-cylinder/auto) till he bought himself an ’86 Buick Park Avenue (which he loved, it was a nice driving car that got 30 MPG on the highway with the 3.8L V6). His family kept the old Chevy and he recently restored it.

    *E28 I guess? German platform codes might as well be Greek to me…

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    I gradutated in ’90 here in Oklahoma. I remember lots of cool cars; a fairly new, beautiful Camaro RS (V6 though) that once hit an armadillo at 90mph, a ’70 Chevelle SS that got taken away after the second street-racing ticket, a 455 powered Skylark, a ’70s El Camino that regularly baited cops into chases, and assorted beater malaise cars and trucks that jumped curbs and the ramp-shaped slope in the Braum’s parking lot.

    I think I had the uncoolest car in the lot – a ’78 Mazda GLC. Looking back on it, I wish I had known at the time that just about every part from an RX-7 would bolt right into it. I probably would have kept it.

    The uncoolest car (that we didn’t realize at the time) was a new (at the time) Mitsubishi Conquest. If I remember right, it was in the shop a lot.

  • avatar
    don1967

    The thing about being in high school in the 1980s was that the pinnacle of automotive crapitude was just hitting the used-car market.

    The list is too long to recall, but the winner was surely the rusty 4-year-old Lada driven by that cute brunette who sat next to me in study period.

  • avatar
    threeer

    As far as age, condition, cost and “cool” factor, likely my car. High school for me was 1984-1988. Upon returning from Germany, I inherited my sister’s first car, a 1978 Plymouth Arrow GT resplendent in all of it’s burnt orange goodness, arrow graphics and end of life metal rot after spending several winters in Wisconsin. I didn’t care! It was a stick shift with houndstooth interior and my GF loved it. I parked that sucker next to kids who grew up with fathers that weren’t lowly NCOs (one kid had parents that bought him a brand new Mk1 MR2) and cherished every minute of my time behind the wheel of that 2.0 liters of wonderful teenage freedom!

  • avatar
    cls12vg30

    For me, HS was 1991-95. Suburbs of Buffalo, NY, so it was a pretty blue-collar area and rust was VERY prevalent.

    Worst car? My ’82 Datsun 200SX with 200+k miles and a structure composed of at least 30% rust would have to be in the running, as would the ’79 Monza and the ’88 Escort Pony that my two best friends had. Another friend had a mostly-primer mid-80s Chevy pickup that used more starter fluid than gasoline. He was also way into weed and loved the regular cab for hot-boxing. There was at least one Chevette in the HS lot, still barely hanging on, and I remember this one girl had an ’83 Accord that had about as much rust as my Datsun. One classmate had an early Fiero burn up on them while stuck on one of the bridges to Canada.

    As to the general HS automotive environment at this time, for the kids that got family hand-me-downs there were K-cars, Horizons, Cavaliers, Celebrities, Escorts & Tempos. There were several “luckier” kids with Iron Duke and 2.8L Camaros, and several Fox bodies. At this time a 5.0 convertible Mustang GT was everybody’s idea of a dream car. Japanese cars were less popular in this place and time because they still couldn’t resist the rust as well as the domestics.

    This being the early ’90s, big sound systems, headlight covers and No Fear stickers were everywhere.

  • avatar
    komododave

    My high school girlfriend had a hand-me-down early 80s, faded yellow Chevy LUV truck with a bed full of rust and leaves. She had to park it in the dirt even though they had a large driveway. We made out in it a lot but that was a pile of shit.

  • avatar
    jryand47

    Still in high school here, class of 2018. I live in an upper middle class part of Western Pennsylvania so piece of crap cars are relatively hard to find, but the one that stands out the most is a rusted out Ford Aerostar cargo van. It squeals like a pig every time it starts up and several parts of it are duct taped on. Best car by far is either a brand new WRX or a new C-class. There’s a decent handful of lifted Wrangler Unlimiteds too.

  • avatar
    garagezone@gmail.com

    I came from a place where if you had YOUR OWN CAR in high school. THAT was COOL. Not that all the cars were great…but having wheels of your own rocked. Luckily the Pep Boys/Autozone stick-on didn’t exist then.


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