By on May 4, 2017

BMW 3 Series (E90), Image: BMW

If you’re in Manhattan on a Wednesday night, you need to head to Arthur’s in the village and catch the 10 p.m. set by soul singer Allyson Williams. She has one of the all-time great voices, expressive and touching, and she has a rotating group of crack musicians backing her up.

A few years ago, I sprawled out in Arthur’s in the middle of a post-auto-show drinking binge when Allyson decided to cover Chaka Khan’s “Through The Fire.” For a chance to be with you, the song says, I’d gladly risk it all. At the time, I took it as a personal rebuke from the Fates for having abandoned the woman I loved. Although I’ve returned to the scene many times since then, I’ve never heard her sing the tune again. Maybe I imagined it. Hard to say.

If you really love someone, you’ll endure a lot to be with them. And that’s the problem facing Eddie, although in his case it’s not a matter of going “through the fire.” Rather, it’s a question of shipping across the pond.

Eddie writes:

For the past four years, I’ve driven a 2006 Audi, my first premium car. I was the second owner, and the car was well maintained throughout its life. Once it passed the 140,000 mile mark, I sold it despite it only costing about a grand a year to maintain, tires included. With the help of a dealer friend, I located and bought a very clean 2011 328xi with 50 thousand miles, deep-sea blue exterior and oyster leather seats. It has few options (no nav or turbos, alas no world-class xenons like the Audi either), but it’s an incredible car. I really love it.

Unfortunately, within weeks of owning the BMW, my wife got a job offer in the UK, and we’re moving this summer. The company she’ll work for has a generous moving policy. This creates a conundrum: Should I move the car to the UK? Is it legally possible? Cost prohibitive? If this is possible, is it a good idea with the steering wheel on the left side and a 3.0-liter gas engine?

If the collective wisdom says this is not a good idea, the next question is: What should I buy in the UK? I love the idea of a stick-shift 5-door 1 Series with a 2.0-liter diesel, but the interior doesn’t look very nice in photos. Additionally, unlike the thorough research I did when weighing the pros and cons of various model years and BMW powertrains in the US, I know little about those offered by BMW in Europe. All I know is that two doors won’t work (single-car couple) and that we both seriously dislike the idea of driving anything higher than a proper sedan. Also, it has to be a stick as my wife still misses her manual Jetta she had when we met.

Let me start by saying that I completely understand how Eddie feels here. I recently fell in love with the E90 for the first time on a long passenger ride to a motorcycle show. Hindsight has been particularly kind to this generation of Bimmer.

As Dominic Toretto would say, however, “You might be in my good graces / But you’re not keeping your car.” This isn’t because it’s terribly difficult to bring an American car to the UK, because it’s not. The Individual Vehicle Approval process is fairly straightforward. From what I’ve read, the biggest issue is usually headlight and taillight compliance, which in this case should be easy because UK-compatible lights are easily obtainable. It’s possible that you’d have to pay up to 30 percent in duties and VAT, although the duties might be waived if you’ve owned the car for over six months, leaving you with just a 20-percent surcharge plus the cost of shipping.

And that is where we start to get into the meat of the problem. It’s expensive to ship the car, expensive to have it put through the IVA process, and expensive to be taxed on the total. The costs can vary wildly depending on relatively minor issues — and when you’re done you still have a car that is more expensive to insure because it’s LHD and has what the UK insurers consider a massive engine.

I’m thinking it would be considerably cheaper to sell the 328xi and buy something like this. You’ll want the better fuel economy in a country where “petrol” costs equal to $5/gallon even today. It’s no trouble to find a manual-transmission BMW in the United Kingdom, as it’s still the default drivetrain of choice for 5 Series and below cars. It’s easier to operate a RHD car in the UK, particularly in traffic. And the process of purchasing and insuring the car is far more straightforward than the import process. It’s one thing to be an English hobbyist who is jonesing for a Corvette; it’s another thing to try to move your entire life to Great Britain and handle your car at the same time.

Last tip I’d offer: don’t buy a diesel. “Derv” is on the decline in the UK and pretty soon you won’t be able to drive a diesel-engined car into most population centers. Be smart and get the same thing you’ve got in the US — only a little bit less. It might hurt to leave your baby on the wrong side of the Atlantic, but take it from this formerly heartbroken man: time heals all wounds.

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47 Comments on “Ask Jack: Cross the Pond or Ditch the Ride?...”


  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    A good friend relocated to the UK for a year and just bought a local car rather than move his very nice Contour SVT. Driving on the Left is going to be challenging enough.

    To throw a curve ball, what about an unobtainium marquee? Like a Citroen C6 (they make gassers) gumtree.com/p/citroen/2007-57-citroen-c6-exclusive-2.7hdi-auto-lounge-pack-1-owner-/1237154128?

    Motorways are crowded and either move really fast when outside the purview of speed and average speed cameras or crawl along – there isn’t really much in the way of open-road motoring, and the big Citroen would keep you nice and comfortable at any speed. It’d also be great for extended blasts across Europe.

    • 0 avatar
      Syke

      There’s no problems whatsoever with driving on the left, be it automobile or motorcycle. I’ve done both, and adjusted very easily. Including manual transmission.

      Cross the street with traffic running opposite what you’ve had a lifetime to adjust to? Now that’s another matter. I’ve almost been run down in London by a double decker bus. While cold sober. Because my reflexes were working the opposite of what they should have been. Thank God for the gentleman who grabbed me by the collar and pulled me back.

      • 0 avatar
        Felix Hoenikker

        Syke, I’m in Ireland now and agree about crossing the street.

      • 0 avatar
        shoshone

        I drove for 3 weeks in Ireland and the UK last year for the first time. I had no trouble with RHD and left shift. Driving on the “wrong side” of the road was another issue. Most driving is “automatic” with lane issues and navigation being concentrated upon. But when the entire experience is a mirror image of your lifetime it became exhausting. My concentration in all things was total. Then add double roundabouts. Of course experience would ease things over time.

      • 0 avatar
        zamoti

        It seems like it would be VERY hard to see around traffic when you’re on the wrong side of the car. You’d have a rather hard time passing on a two lane road when you’re looking from the far side. Making a right turn across traffic would be most unpleasant.

        That aside, it’s a low-spec BMW. They are plentiful and now you will live in a place where there are many choices that aren’t available to those of us in the US. Treat yourself to a Twingo or a Micra ;)

        • 0 avatar
          Eddie_B

          Maybe Polo or Golf’s Skoda equivalent, zamoti? I used to drive a friend’s first gen Twingo when I was an undergrad!

        • 0 avatar
          DirtRoads

          Zam, you’re also driving on the other side of the road, so the net effect of the change is zero.

          As one Brit told me, just remember to “keep the dirt on the left” and you’ll be fine.

          And it’s interesting to clutch with the left foot (no change) but shift with the left hand…

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        That’s funny that mention looking in the other direction when crossing the street. In Sydney they paint the edge of crosswalks with look right (and occasionally look left when crossing one way streets)

  • avatar
    bikegoesbaa

    2011 BMWs 3-series are common enough that without too much trouble you could get a good one on the other side, and then another one here when you get back; and come out ahead vs shipping.

    If you had something that was rare or irreplaceable then I’d say maybe ship it over.

    For what is ultimately just a regular car? No way. I’d not want to spend time an energy while getting established in a new life in a new country chasing down the magic stamp that will make a car with the wheel on the wrong side “OK” in the eyes of the local bureaucrats.

  • avatar
    Caboose

    Gonna have to learn to shift left-handed. Just thinking about that makes me twitchy. A lifetime of muscle memory… *poof!*

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      you get used to it quickly. I’ve driven several RHD stick shift cars, and didn’t have much trouble adjusting. it was actually harder to remember where to look for the rear view mirror.

      • 0 avatar
        sching

        You do get used to shifting with your left hand quickly. I learned in Canada and now drive stick in Hong Kong (ex-British colony, drive on left side of the road), plus went back to right-hand shifting when driving in Europe without too much adjustment required.

        Now, using the turn-signal stalk in cars designed in RHD countries (Japan, UK) and those designed in LHD countries (US, Europe, Korea), that’s a recipe for constantly turning on the wipers unintentionally – and not signally your lane change.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          I have to agree. Getting used to the turn signal stalk, going the correct way through an empty roundabout and looking at the top of the A pillar for the rearview mirror threw me off the most. Driving on the wrong side of the road didn’t take me any time to get used to.

    • 0 avatar
      TDIGuy

      Mirror image operation, like sitting on the right side of the car and shifting with your left hand isn’t as bad as learning something new with your off hand. (For example, writing backwards with your off hand is a lot easier than writing forwards with it.)

      You’ll end up signalling with your wipers until you get used to it.

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    Never ever to be confused with Allison Williams, daughter of Brian, co-star of Girls.

    Get a Reliant Robin!

  • avatar
    Carrera

    Jack is right on the money. Sell.
    I kept both my cars when I moved to Canada because..it was Canada. Europe? No way. Even if the wife works for a government entity and you don’t have to register the vehicle, still a pain in the butt. Get something local, easy to fix. Good on fuel also.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Sell the BMW before you move. Buy a VXR8 when you get there and just don’t drive much. I hear public transportation is good in Europe, so there you go.

  • avatar
    twotone

    Buy a brand new highest HP Corvette, Demon, Mustang, Camaro or other US muscle car. Take it with you and sell it when you are done. They go for stupid high prices over there. As does the petrol to keep it running.

    Actually, it’s probably more difficult than it’s worth.

    When I lived and worked in the UK I leased a Ford Mondeo. Not a bad car actually (sold here as a re-badged Jaguar S Type).

    An X350 Jaguar Vanden Plas would be pretty cheap there and you would actually have a chance finding a mechanic to fix it.

    • 0 avatar
      Eddie_B

      twotone… OP here. this is not a terrible idea. perhaps live in the uk for a year, make sure things worlk out job-wise etc, and do it on the second year.

  • avatar
    ExPatBrit

    A BMW 3 series is the default rep mobile in the UK. Not special at all. Like others have said maybe buy something you can’t get in the US. Skoda,Citroen etc

    New cars are expensive but depreciation is insane so there are a ton of cheap as chips used German cars on the market.

    Just make sure it has an long MOT, they will fail you for as little as no windshield washer fluid over there.

  • avatar
    overdale

    A BMW (even an LHD one) will guarantee you don’t stand out in the crowd here in the UK as they are on every street corner. And speed cameras everywhere mean the faster your car the more chance of losing your licence pretty quickly. Brighten up our lives and bring a proper American car and then sell it when you leave.

  • avatar
    Pierre

    I shipped my car to Europe a few years back so I speak from experience. Unless it is a model/brand that you cannot find in Europe and that that really love and must have ( US brands or US -only Japanese brands/models – can only think of Acura here ) it is not worth doing it. There’s a plethora of lightly used BMW available in the UK with better choices than the US ( engine /transmission ).The price for used cars in the UK drops pretty fast compared to let’s say Germany (there is less demand for used cars since they are RHD and not popular in East Europe) therefore finding a good deal is easy, plus you avoid the headaches with paperwork, certification, VAT and import duties. However, if you have the EU citizenship then can import your car tax-free if you have owned the car for more than 1 year, just so you know. Shipping is not that expensive, I paid $1000 from the East Cost (Savannah Georgia) to Bremerhaven Germany and also you do not need to change the headlamps, you can just add a beam converter sticker which is pretty cheap

  • avatar
    spreadsheet monkey

    I live in the UK and agree with Jack’s advice. Stick with manual transmission and small petrol engines.

    The 3-series is a very popular car in the UK so there are plenty of late model used cars to chose from. There are some very good lease deals available on new BMWs, which might work well for him and his wife, depending on how long they are planning to stay in the UK.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    I agree that getting something you can’t get here is worth a through investigation. Doesn’t say how long the plan is to live there. If it matches up with a lease term, ie 2 or 3 years I think that would be the way to go depending on if leases are often heavily subsidized over there on the vehicle of your desire. Now if it is open ended they drive/rent a bunch of different late model used vehicles and find what suits you best.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      A lease company will not allow you to take the car out of the country. Some brands will allow you to take it to Canada. Also, if a car is financed, most finance companies will not release the title which of course is needed in the host country. I’ve seen this situation with coworkers coming to Canada. If the state they were from had huge registration excise taxes ( ME, NH, Virginia, etc) they would try to register them asap in Nova Scotia. Guys like me from Florida, kept the cars registered in Florida for the duration of assignment. ( 2-5 years). Chrysler would release the title if the payee had a good payment history and only 2 years or so were left on the note. Nissan/Infiniti would not release at all until fully paid. One of mine was paid, the Ridgeline wasn’t but trying to add DLRs for Canada was a pain. So I kept Florida plates.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        No one said anything about taking a lease car out of the country. My point was that if the planned length of stay lined up with a lease period that a lease might be the best way to go. That way you turn in and head home, or rent a car while wrapping up to come back to the US.

  • avatar
    jxpatt

    Jack’s points are wel attenuated (I live in the UK and his analysis is spot on). In addition to the LHD problem in traffic, LHD is a poor option for the B road network etc.

    I think your best best is to sell the 328, and pick up a 325i, 330i or 335i (depending on your aspiration aspirations) when you get here. Insurance isn’t terrible. And don’t let the expat comment about Rep mobiles put you off… the “see you next tuesdays” no longer drive bimmers here, theyre all to a man in the frowny audis these days, looking miserable and tailgating.

    • 0 avatar
      Eddie_B

      Thanks jxpatt! I appreciate expat’s comments and essentially agree – mine are a dime a dozen. i just don’t care… i bought it for what it offers, and i am happy with it. will look into a 325i. aluminum trim and stick shift!

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I have to agree with Jack on not shipping your car, but don’t let a measly $5/gallon equivalent force you to get a tiny engine fuel sipper with no guts. You’ll never drive far enough on a trip for the fuel cost to get onerous. Pick a model with an engine that moves the car the way you want, and accept a modest fuel cost penalty over driving dissatisfaction.

  • avatar
    jamesbrownontheroad

    Sell it, and buy something over here. If you drive a BMW, you’ll want to use it on our narrow and twisty roads, and you’re gonna regret sitting in the left hand seat when you need to pass a slower moving vehicle.

    Don’t forget another reason we like manual transmissions and smaller engines with are the rates of tax levied on vehicles. These are calculated by engine size and CO2 g/km emissions. I don’t know but I reckon your 328i would fall in at least Band G, which is £190 a year ($250).

    • 0 avatar
      jxpatt

      A 328i is £150pa. The more pertinent point is that there are very few on these shores (so: hard to buy, hard to keep in parts, hard to service).

      325 / 330 / 335 are much more readily come by.

  • avatar
    Frank Galvin

    Here’s my two cents. Stop thinking about the BMW and cars to purchase, period. Knowing that you’ll need something, consider getting a short term car hire when you arrive for a month or two. You’ll have time to acclimate to the area, see what the commute is like or not depending on distance, public transportation, etc. You and the wife will have time to get a feel for the local conditions; spirited roads, hedgerows, speed camera zones, parking, garaging, commute, travel, etc. And then, depending on where you are, you’ll get to see all that unobtanium in the flesh. Or, the wife says she wants a sedan now, only that here, the hatchback is the odd duck. People do change their mind. And with a new home to furnish – surely she may see the need for a hatch or “estate.”

    Do you want to have a set of preconceived notions based on all your research, undoubtedly from the natives? The Brits write for the Brits, not for us. Keep that in mind. We are talking about the automotive press whose titular head invented the wobble. But Jack is right, ditch any consideration of a diesel. The bureaucrats are moving against it, and quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      Eddie_B

      Good advice Frank. Won’t make any moves at least two three months into being there. Besides, even here I never bought any German cars before actually befriending indie mechanics that can fix them. So I’ll have to learn that landscape as well before making a move.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Sell. It isn’t an ultra-rare collectible and even if it were, I’d say sell.

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    From a UK perspective, yes it is surprisingly straightforward to import a car from the US. So why don’t more people? Mostly because traditionally US cars have had huge gas guzzling engines, and fuel is ridiculously expensive in the UK, hence why diesel has been popular until recently.

    Imports tend to be niche items, like hummer limos for ferrying bachelorette parties.

    Importing a BMW should be easy enough, UK law demands things like a rear foglight – however an EU light unit should fit straight in. Compared to the Cobalt SS that an ex-colleague tried to import, of which there was no compatible UK spec light fitting.

    There is no issue (unlike some RHD countries) with left hand drive. There are plenty of mainland Europeans who have re-registered their cars. The only issue would be with visibility – many rural roads are quite narrow, trying to see past a slow moving tractor without hitting oncoming traffic may be a challenge.

    BMW 3 series aren’t exactly a rare car in the UK though, there are plenty of options. A good lot of the cars on the market will be diesel – it mightn’t be worth discounting this option just yet, unless you plan on commuting into central London (and paying the current congestion charge) everyday. As previously said, fuel in the UK is expensive, if you drive a lot you will find a large chunk of your income paying $6 a gallon of unleaded gas/petrol.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    If you buy a new one, you might even be able to do a factory delivery. That’d be fun.

    • 0 avatar
      Eddie_B

      TDI, I just don’t see us putting money down for a brand new car. It’s so easy to find gently used ones with 50k, and frankly a lot of cars have teething problems that tend to get sorted out by then, while the consumables haven’t been used up yet. So if you are rather meticulous in your process, you’re getting a lot more car for your money.

  • avatar
    Eddie_B

    Hey everyone, original poster here.
    Thanks for posting my query and giving us advice Jack – you must have known it wouldn’t be one of those threads with many clicks. This is REALLY helpful. A couple of takeaways from the comments:
    1. The advice to not move the car to the UK seems unanimous. This actually saves us a lot of headache. Moving the kitty cat alone seems to be a TON of paperwork. And in the meanwhile, my father-in-law has taken quite a liking to the car, once he learned what I paid for it. So I think we won’t even have to sell.
    2. I am very surprised to hear Jack and many others here recommend walking away from diesel. I have been looking into 120d or 123d five-doors, but I suppose I’ll start looking into either gas engines, or other brands.
    3. I’m terrified about the idea of learning how to cross the street! But I drove in the UK once, and shifting with my left hand wasn’t horrible. That 1.2 liter in the Corsa we rented WAS horrible. I learned to plant my foot to the floor, wait there for three minutes to get up to speed, and never let go at all costs.
    4. I am nicely surprised at how respectful everyone has been, given yesterday’s “conclusion” that E46, and not E90, were the last great BMWs. Jack’s linked column explains to a T our choice – we take 300-800 mile trips about four times a year, and comfort is very important. E46es are simply too old now… and we just don’t have time for many repairs. I know E90 isn’t special at all, but that’s not important to me. What it offers is why I bought one.

  • avatar
    redmondjp

    So what is the reason for not recommending a diesel? Is it because of the troubles with the emissions systems? I was in the UK back in the late 1990s and spent almost a week in a Ford diesel and didn’t even know it (was so smooth and quiet)!

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      In order to improve air quality, many European cities are moving toward using restrictions and taxes to keep diesels out of congested areas.

      http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/a33255/why-diesel-is-done-for-in-passenger-cars/

      A diesel vehicle might still make sense if resale values are low and you don’t need to drive it into London regularly.

  • avatar
    Adam_

    Hello from Herefordshire. I think everyone is on the money advising you to sell. A US import of a euroean car is a as we say “selling coal to Newcastle” or “selling sand to the Saudi Arabia”. Actually we do that, we just call them weapons and they haven’t noticed. You can buy Mustangs and Camaros officially here so whoever said import an MC and you will make your fortune is on the kool-aid (which is not sold here)

    Everyone is talking about the cars and not about the UK. Some facts. The whole of the UK is smaller than New York state. New York State has a population of 19.8 million (2015). Its populous by US standards. The UK has a population of 65.1 million (2015). And we have 25.8 million licenced on the road cars. You don’t say where you will be living, but it if is anywhere near London (Average day time traffic speed within M25 which is the London beltway is 11.2 mph), Birmingham and Manchester 15-20, Bristol approximately zero because they have just shunted you or are chasing you with a baseball bat. Baseball is not a popular sport here but bats are compact and easilly secreted with in a small european car. Furthermore, we like big signalised priority junctions, roundabouts (rotaries) and signal controlled pedestrian crossings which have cameras on them so that’s £100 fine if you ingnore them. You don’t pay, attachement order (garnishee) on your or your wifes earnings if the car is registered to her.

    Before I moved to sunny Welsh border I was a criminal defence lawyer in London. I lived three miles from Kings Cross. I only used my car between the hours of 11pm and 7am because that’s when the little darlings get arrested. Here you get a state funded attorney at the Police station. We have no PD’s we have to do some state work at reduced rates. At least I did before I had enough. So with all the traffic lights, rotaries, signal ped crossings et what is the average traffic speed at 3am in inner London. You guessed right, 16.8 mph, because all of the traffic lights are optimised for maximum traffic flow in a state of permanent congestion. I had a Merc C200 supercharged but one of my own clients stole it and “ringed” it by mistake from the back of a police station. I couldn’t act for him and he was very apologetic. He and his colleagues had paid for it. I bought a three year old astra with what was in my current account and have driven old bangers ever since. We drive like everone else. Badly.

    For this job, which paid for some houses and an early retirement I had an automatic 2 litre Astra. The same as the one Saturn sold except mine was a wagon. A US gallon (3.78 litre) will cost you about USD 5.25, about 5.50 for “DERV” as Jack so quaintly calls it, I havent seen the term for Diesel on a filling station for at least 30 years but you know, his heyday was the 80’s. Many local authorities are now charging more for resident’s parking permits for oil burners if you live in a controlled parking zone.

    So, finally, what this means is that because the traffic is so slow, your diesel DPF can’t regenrate so it regularly needs forced regens at USD 400-1200. One of my friends just had it done on his twin turbo diesel vauxhall insignia which you get as some sort of Buick. Good value, he’s had it a whole year and no it isn’t covered under warranty. You want a stick shift, where I live now it’s fine but the new 6-7-8 speed autos are so good, and there is so much congestion you will bore of your “man and clutch pedal in perfect harmony very quickly”.

    Finally I suggest you hire something for a while before you decide. I have lived in the US and UK, admittedly US was nearly forty years ago, but it’s a culture shock. We do nearly verything differently including eating and pro-creation. Wheels are not your priority in the first few months. What if wife doesn’t like the job? It’s only a car. So, consider an auto with spark plugs. Perhaps an SUV. Maybe a Hyundai or KIA because the euro built ones we get here are rather good, or a 1.2 turbo petrol Dacia Duster. Rough, ready lots of room and good residuals but buy new. If you get a CPO you get the balance of a long warranty and there is a 6 month dealer anti-lemon law here. Basically any undisclosed fault in the first six moths is assumed to be pre existing so your covered. If you want small and practical go Honda Jazz (fit). None better for room and reliability. 10 million 80 year olds can’t be wrong.

    I suspect your Corsa 1.2 was a 90’s 8 valve job? A friend had a few for his car hire firm in Devon. He figured that stick incompetent Muricans or Saudis couldn’t kill themselves in them. They were notoriously slow. Worse in the bigger Astra. The ones they make now do about 110 -120 bhp in about 1100 kg. Slow they are not now.

    If you must go VAG, make sure that the Dual Clutch is the wet type. The dry clutch in smaller VAGs sich as the golf, yeti, polo, ibiza some little Audi shit is bretty bad. As for front drive BMW’s such as 1S, 2S Mini..just don’t. Ecoboost fiestas and focus’s have clutch problems and a garage I do legal work for sees a lot of cracked blocks.

    You will find the car culture so different you will be slightly bewildered. No point in looking for a Camry because we stopped getting them over 10 years ago. No more Accords for us either. We’ve gone SUV crazy too. If I came back tomorow it would be a car I can afford. And when I say a ford I mean a Fit. With two pedals. Or a CR-V.

    Best of luck to you and your SO, wherever in this small, wet declining looney bin you are heading. Come to the Wye Valley. It’s very nice. Have a look at the Honest John website. Longtime critic of Diesels. Sound Chap.

    • 0 avatar
      shoshone

      Thanks for the overview! Wye Valley it is. I don’t care what I drive but I want to bring my Commando. Riding it in the homeland is tops on my bucket list.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam_

        Which commie have you got? Do you have fillings? Socialised medicine does not extend to dental work any more. My nearest was a Meriden T140E US spec kick start, 1979. Part time alternator and I checked rotor clearance with solder strips and all that stuff. Never worked. I was always being “pulled”. “How fast were we going, Sir” “Between 26 and 93, Constable”. That was before I qualified as a scumbag defence lawyer so they would rap on about their fantasy GSX1100s, it was always GSX1100s and they let me go.

  • avatar
    LambourneNL

    Euro here. Would probably just buy another 3 series in the UK, they’re very common and the UK has pretty low used car prices (compared to mainland Europe anyway). A left hand drive car is doable for a few months but it gets annoying eventually (overtaking, toll booths, taking a parking ticket etc)

    The E90 4 cylinder diesels have issues with the timing chain (N47 engine, it’s all over the internet), the 6 cylinder ones seem to do better and are fantastic engines.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I guess not enough time has passed yet ~

    I hope that psychotic bitch never calls me again…..

    -Nate


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