By on March 16, 2017

Honda Canada Utility Commercial: Image: Honda Canada/YouTube

Underneath its skin, the Honda Ridgeline is a significantly altered Honda Pilot, a large three-row utility vehicle related to the next-generation Honda Odyssey minivan. That’s hardly the stuff of which traditional, body-on-frame pickups are made.

But the Ridgeline has a separate, exposed bed, an elevated ride height, and competitive payload ratings. Therefore, it’s a pickup truck.

Or is it? In one recent Honda Canada commercial, the Ridgeline is portrayed alongside the HR-V, CR-V, and Pilot under the Honda Utility banner.

“Go where you wanna go,” The Mamas & the Papas sing, as a tree-lined bike trail appears with the CR-V in the HR-V’s rear seat, as a mountainside Pilot scene materializes in the CR-V’s cargo area, as the Ridgeline’s soccer setting unfolds from the Pilot’s third row.

Has Honda decided the Ridgeline is a sport-utility vehicle? A CUV?

No.

“We view the Ridgeline as a competitor in the midsize pickup segment,” Honda Canada’s public relations coordinator Alen Sadeh told TTAC earlier this week. “We think this Ridgeline is exceptionally strong at adapting to all the different ways people use their trucks.”

As for the Ridgeline’s less-than-trucky platform, the “unibody architecture provides very competitive pickup truck capabilities, including a large standard bed space and class-leading payload capacity with fundamentally better interior packaging and driving dynamics,” said Sadeh.

The pickup truck classification was a subject brought up five times in Honda’s response to our inquiry. SUV? No mentions? Crossover? No mentions. CUV? Not a once.

Honda, confirmed Alen Sadeh, believes the Ridgeline is a midsize pickup truck.

Do you agree? And if it isn’t a midsize pickup truck, what is the Honda Ridgeline?

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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104 Comments on “QOTD: What is the Honda Ridgeline?...”


  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Its a Pilot which is an Odyssey, with an open bed.

  • avatar
    caltemus

    It’s biggest asset and greatest detriment is that it is more than most people really need and still less than they perceive they need.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      “Needs” are generally intermittent. The bed on the Ridge is a bit short for many common “needs” where a 6.5 or 8 would be fine. Like moving, or hauling larger street bikes (big deal in Cali, where speed limit with any trailer, even a skateboard dangling off the hitch receiver, is 20mph lower than with the bike in bed.)

      I’m sure it would be fiendishly difficult to accomplish in a unibody without throwing body integrity to the side, but an Avalanche style midgate would be really, really well suited for the Ridgeline. Most people rarely need a full crewcab AND a longish bed at the same time. But may do sometimes need a crewcab, other times a longish bed.

      Honda will get there eventually. They have a knack for that, and a customer base willing to pay for even somewhat expensive solutions, as long as they are practical.

      But in the vast, open, pickup upland, where a crew/long, or at least crew/6.5 fits without undue issue, they’re hard to beat for covering all needs, all the time. And doing so without resorting to any expensive solutions at all.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        “But an Avalanche style midgate would be really, really well suited for the Ridgeline.”

        +1.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        stuki,
        Then why all the crew cabs if beds have a common need of 6.5 to 8 feet?

        Most pickups are bought for their flexibility as a family hack.

        Pickups, even with a five foot bed offer more usable load ability than a SUV and CUV. You can fold down seats and whatever, but the ease to throw that bag of mulch and $3s worth of screws in the bed makes them attractive.

        Pickups have become the chosen vehicle by many because they offer ease of use.

        Many people will tolerate the poorer vehicle dynamics offered by pickups. But some will not.

        The Ridgeline offers a versatile pickup that has superior vehicle dynamics and poaches some of those who would of bought a SUV or poor handling pickup.

  • avatar
    Pesky Varmint

    Doesn’t matter.

    All trucks 1/2 ton or less are bought for image only.

    • 0 avatar
      ptschett

      Fact check: false.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      In reality, the half ton crew cab is the modern station wagon.

      I thought this just yesterday as I saw three large male teens bound out of the back of one. As they went to wreck their parents’ food budget at a local restaurant.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “All trucks 1/2 ton or less are bought for image only.”

      WRONG! Most people buy them because they tow an RV, boat, snowmobile/UTV/ATV/utility trailer, race trailer, ect. The fact that you can’t even buy one without a factory receiver hitch and 7 pin trailer plug already put on from the factory should tell you something if you can put 2 & 2 together.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Wrong.

        Most people buy a pickup because they have the means to pay the cost of ownership.

        Most pickups sit at work during the day empty with only a driver and rarely tow or carry a load.

        I have read the AVERAGE load towed by a pickup is 5 000lbs. Average. So there are lots more towing less than HDs bumping those numbers up.

        Maybe 25% are used as you stated.

        This pickup myth to justify pickup ownership is silly.

        Lets be honest. Most people buy pickups because they can.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          [Citation needed] for just about every sentence in that comment.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Use the net.

            Whilst many comments reflect pickup truck ads I’ll continue to correct them.

            There are a group who use pickups to tow and carry loads. This appears larger than it really is, because there are THREE times more pickups sitting in parking lots alongside Wranglers, FJs, Raptors, etc at workplaces and shopping malls looking pretty for their owners.

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            “[Citation needed] for just about every sentence in that comment.”

            He doesn’t have a clue about what goes on in this country and honestly I have to wonder why he cares so much about pretending like he does. The whole thing is silly and sad at the same time.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Yeah, there’s this thing called burden of proof. If you’re gonna make these claims, the burden is on /you/ to back them up. You don’t tell other people to “look them up.”

            You have a lot of valuable things to say regarding the AUS market, but your continued refusal to ever back up your claims with any evidence is disenheartening and discrediting.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I don’t know if they have citations in Australia.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            They’re called Omegas down there.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ah. I think they are called Firenzas in New Zealand.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Now you guys are just going to whip him into a Firenz-y.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            Winners of the Car Name Game Challenge will be posted tomorrow morning, by the way.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            28 cars,
            We do and they are a great American aircraft;)

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            DrZ,
            It was actually LouBC who posted the link a couple of years back.

            I used to use links, but it makes no differnce. You guys get on the net and prove me wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            BAFO misread the [citation]. That’s why *no link* and you’ll never find it.

            The article studied “truck” useage, including CUVs/SUVs, PT Cruisers, HHRs, Pilots, Cubes, minivans, etc, not exclusively “pickups”, as BAFO *thought*.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Don’t waste your time. When the facts come from BAFO, they’re wrong.

            When fuel price spiked upward, fullize pickup sales hardly felt a dent. That should tell you everything, “want vs need”.

            But how can anyone fault the occasion 1/2 ton pickup buyer with zero intentions of putting it to hard work, banged up, etc?
            Or even occasional The Home Depot runs for a box of screws.

            So we love our USA fullsize pickups. Snivel all you want. Start a “class action” if you don’t like it.

            They’re irresistible if you ask me. Terrific value, all around. But if you’ve never had one, I promise you’ll be addicted. They’re always ready for the “whatever”. Obvious spirit of adventure. Or work!

            Why can’t it be for a combination of things? Big or small (load), who knows ahead of time??

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “Most people buy a pickup because they have the means to pay the cost of ownership.”

          Compare the price of a crewcab 4×4 pickup to that of any large CUV or SUV.
          Most people buy *ANY $40,000 dollar vehicle* because they have the means to pay the cost of ownership. (Or have the credit rating to do so.)

          “Most pickups sit at work during the day empty with only a driver and rarely tow or carry a load.”
          I wish I would have saved the link but at least 1/2 of pickups sold are used for work. Back to “the means to pay the cost of ownership”.
          How many people can afford a commuter vehicle while the truck sites at home?
          Ever price out the rental costs of a crewcab 4×4?
          You might as well buy the truck.

          “I have read the AVERAGE load towed by a pickup is 5 000lbs. Average. So there are lots more towing less than HDs bumping those numbers up.”

          Typical, you left out the rest of the information.
          Ram justified not playing the 1/2 ton max tow war by stating that their research showed that the average 1/2 ton pickup towed no more than 5,000 lbs.
          Do you know how big a 5,000 lb camper trailer is?
          You are in the 24-26 feet long range.
          I’d much rather hook up that 5,000 lb trailer to something rated to tow 10,000 lbs than to something rated to tow 5,000lbs.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            LouBC,
            Correction. 50% are a tax writ off by business. That is much different than work.

            I do know people in construction in the US who have a couple of pickups etc.

            One is for the wife, the husband has a pickup and BOTH never see “work”.

            You seem to confuse work and a business write off.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @BAFO – “You seem to confuse work and a business write off.”

            Nope.

            You know *ONE* couple and that extrapolates to the general population?
            Once again, you are the one spewing misinformation. You must be a cousin of Putinspotus.

            I had a small first aid business for a few years so I know how write-offs work. I’m not familiar with USA tax code but if one is to write off a truck as a work expense they need to be registered under a business. If it is a proprietorship then all of the business usage has to be tracked and logged separate from personal use.
            My brother has a company supplied truck and has to do the reverse, he has to account for personal use for tax purposes.
            He tends to have to claim very little since he is often “on call” and therefore that counts as being on the job. Any time he is on a designated company road, that also counts as work.

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        [Raises hand]. Also, the depreciation performance of these trucks is better than a similarly priced car.

        But “pesky varmit’s” comments fit right in with the “rednecks are stupid” meme.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      As soon as I find some bumper sticker blanks, this going on my Tacoma:

      A Man Without A Pickup
      Has to Wait for Delivery

      My Tacoma lives at my weekend house. I’m building a workshop. And an Airplane. I use it to bring my motorcycle in for service. The trip to the dump to get rid of the last vestiges of the kitchen I remodeled was managed in one trip. The full set of base cabinets I bought for my home office fit in the back just fine. On my way to the airport to go flying, the Tacoma makes it easy to fill and carry a few Jerry Cans with no-ethanol fuel that save $2 per gallon. Carrying my PA and guitars to a performance is a non-issue. And, finally, that 65″ TV I bought back in December was a piece of cake to bring home.

      In short, it’s damned useful.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Looks like @BiGal has a buddy = Pesky Varmint

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    However it’s classified, it’s ugly.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    The Ridgeline is a vehicle which you drive to a 4:30 dinner at Cracker Barrel.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    It’s DREAMY!

    There’s a Honda for every middle-class Nice Person’s needs!

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    It’s also nice to see the sort of foliage which will happily grow in the carpet of your CR-V.

  • avatar
    BunkerMan

    I still don’t get why some Ridgeline owners put little caps on their vehicles. Wouldn’t a Pilot do the job just as well in that case? Get a cargo liner for the Pilot if you’re worried about dirt.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The Ridgeline is still longer. And the cargo bed is physically separated from the passenger compartment, which is a plus when carrying certain cargo.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Wanna talk pointless, how about the people that put the caps on Ford Explorer Sportracks? The Sportrack (truck) is based on the Explorer (SUV) which is in tern based on the Ranger (truck) and by putting the cap on they are converting it into an SUV.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          1. It depends on which Sport Trac we’re talking about. The first-gen Sport Trac /is/ the crew cab Ranger we never got. It shares many mechanicals and physical dimensions with the SuperCab Ranger. The second-gen is not Ranger-based, since the third and fourth-gen Explorers were on their own platform.

          2. Putting a removable topper on a crew cab pickup does not “convert” it into an SUV. The passenger cabin is still physically seperated from the cargo compartment, it can’t be legally used for passengers, and even a short bed has more space than the rear cargo area of an extended-length SUV (Suburban or Expedition EL/Max).

          Now, an Avalanche with a topper, that’s bordering on pointless, because then it’s essentially a Suburban with the third row removed.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      You want a chainsaw, 6 gallon gas can (full of gas) & a 7.5 HP Mercury outboard in the back of your SUV with your 3 kids on a 3 hour trip home? Me neither, that’s where a Ridgeline makes a lot more sense than a Pilot. Or in my case, a Sierra over a Tahoe.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        The biggest problem the Ridge faces, is that those who carry chainsaws and the like, live in places where the always heavily discounted full sizers fits perfectly fine. Driving around San Francisco in a crewcab fullsize is plain frustration. But carrying a chainsaw around there in the back of a Ridgeline, would likely get you arrested. For, like being from Texas and looking to massacre, or something.

        • 0 avatar
          George B

          I had a Halloween trick-or-treater show up at my front door here in Texas revving up a real chainsaw minus the chain and a bloody butcher’s apron. He’d probably get arrested in other states, but his elaborate noisy costume was appreciated here.

  • avatar
    ajla

    It’s a truck.

    The “problem” with the Honda isn’t its roots or construction, it’s that the Tacoma and Colorado look cool while the Ridgeline looks like something your friend’s grandparents take to the flea market before hitting up Golden Corral.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    It’s a “sedan utility”! (working off the logic that “coupe utilities” or “utes” are just two-door).

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      That name kinda works, especially since various Japanese cars in the late ’60s were available as both 1- and 2-row coupe utilities (most didn’t have 4 doors, though). But the difference between those and the Ridgeline is that on those, the sedan and coupe utility were variations of the same body. The Ridgeline doesn’t share body panels with anything.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Does anyone know if a set of airbags would help the Ridge not join stance nation under a heavy load? I have nothing against a unibody midsize, bit I’ve seen these things waddling down the highway with a small RV, which is where they fall short to me.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      That’s what Bed & Breakfasts are for, no?

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        No

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          The Ridgeline has a 1,584 lb payload rating and a max tow rating of 5,000 lbs.for the AWD model. The standard model is 3,500 lbs. You add options and that payload rating drops fast.

          You can easily eat up 584 lbs with 4 occupants. That leaves 1,000 lbs if you don’t put anything else in the vehicle.
          I don’t know anyone who tows a trailer with a completely empty pickup.

          Recommended tongue weight for most trailers (other than boats) is 10-15%. In theory, that 5,000 lb trailer is going to shift 500 – 750 lbs onto the vehicle.

          A big tent trailer will give you 3,500 lbs. That would be the most I’d want to tow with it. It just doesn’t have the wheel base to be all that stable.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The only way to get a comfortable ride with a light load in the bed, and simultaneously handle max payload well, without resorting to complex, generally troubleprone suspensions, is to make the base vehicle heavy enough, and with relatively low enough payload capacity, that the difference between empty and max is not too big. The Ram 2500 diesel with the coils does this like well. It’s a 3500 with half the payload, which allows for ridiculously good ride comfort for a truck where the rear axle assembly alone weighs nearly what a Ridgeline is rated to carry.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    For nearly all the purposes for which a suburbanite might use a pickup truck, it’s a truck.

    If you were doing stereotypical truck-commercial truck-things, I suppose it’s a big car with a bed on it.

  • avatar

    Its distressingly ugly but functional, just like the Pilot it was spun from.

  • avatar
    ceipower

    Think of the Ridgeline as a modern version of a El Camino with a back seat and far less panache. Now you’ve got it.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yes this. It is an El Camino for the CUV era, just as an El Camino was a logical extension when the predominant platforms being sold were sold as Coupes, Sedans, and Wagons.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      And far less of a reputation for mulleted drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I actually like it but the biggest problem with it for me is the fact that Toyota has the Tacoma and GM has the Colorado/Canyon.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I have a feeling that the real world transaction price on a Ridgeline compared to an equivalent V6 crew cab Colorado is in the Honda’s favor at least hear in the United States.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @PrincipalDan – In Canada the price is close. A V6 Tacoma double cab 4×4 is 40-55K. Ridgeline 38-50k. Colorado 35-50k.
          If one is bargain hunting the Frontier is the cheapest truck out there. A Doublecab 4×4 is 32-40k.
          I don’t see much in the way of discounts with any of these trucks. Maybe a couple of grand. It is not unusual to find 10-14k off of full sized pickups. If one factors discounts into the picture, a full sized truck costs less.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    “Pickup” means it has an open cargo bed, which it does have; “truck” means it’s BOF and RWD or RWD-based 4WD, which it is not. The Ridgeline is a pickup, but not a truck. And that’s perfectly okay. I hope we see more non-truck pickups in the future.

    What really bothers me is its dimensions. The Ridgeline is slightly shorter than a midsize pickup truck, but as wide as a full-size. But all that width doesn’t give you full six-passenger seating inside.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      If Honda could build the Ridgeline with a bed length close to that of my compact ’93 Toyota PU my interest would definitely be peaked. As it is, the bed is still just to short me to ever consider owning one. I wouldn’t own a midsize GM twin with the short bed either but at least there I have an option for a longer bed unlike the Ridgeline.

      Which brings up a major downside of the Ridgeline compared to other PU’s. Choice. You get 1 cab style and 1 bed length.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      I enjoyed Honda’s old brochures that talked about “Honda Trucks”.

    • 0 avatar
      JDG1980

      “truck means it’s BOF and RWD or RWD-based 4WD”

      So by that standard, the Ford Crown Victoria was a truck?

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        JDG1980 – actually no. You need a separate cargo area. Trunks don’t count and GVW is too low.

        I did read an article once where one of the testers made a snarky remark about the Ram 1500, ” This is where BOF cars would be if car companies kept making them.”

  • avatar
    Jeff Weimer

    Suburban Pickup Utility.

    Honda has looked at it’s customer base, and designed a vehicle they think meets their needs. A truck for people who drive Hondas.

    Enough room for a family of 4 (5 in a pinch)? Check.
    Exposed bed for runs to Home Depot or carrying the occasional outsized object? Check.
    Largely inoffensive styling? Check.
    Decent gas mileage? Check.
    Honda reliability and dealer experience? Check.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      Relatively cheap to make by leveraging existing platforms of higher-volume vehicles? Check.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “Honda has looked at it’s customer base, and designed a vehicle they think meets their needs. A truck for people who drive Hondas.”

      Yep and what a short sided approach. That thinking guarantees they’ll never ever be anything more than a very small niche player in a huge market. How many people you think drive a domestic PU with a Honda or other japanese car parked along side of it in the driveway? No sense going after those people.

  • avatar
    Wunsch

    It’s a good, comfortable family vehicle for people who need or want a pickup bed in the back for hauling messy or dirty stuff. It’s not a traditional work truck, but it’s a truck designed for the way many people want to use one.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Its a vehicle for guys who wanted a V8 1500 pickup, but their wives only let them have a Ridgeline.

    Or so I’m told.

  • avatar
    OzCop

    Call it what you want, but it is still primarily a utilitary vehicle, used for utilitarian purposes…which can be anything from hauling bags of mulch, grass seed, and fertilizer, to towing an aluminum car trailer with a Honda race car…I have three friends here in the DFW metroplex who do just that…and their spouses don’t mind driving it to the grocery or other shopping trips. It is what it are…

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yes if it wasn’t for my Dad’s misplaced allegiance to all things GM the Ridgeline would be the perfect vehicle for my mother. He’s a stickler about cleanliness inside and outside his vehicles and she has a tendency to throw bags of mulch and flats of flowers into the back of her CUV.

      Then Dad is the one with the shop vac trying to get things spotless again.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        “… if it wasn’t for my Dad’s misplaced allegiance to all things GM…”

        I didn’t realize that GM once built a certain Mustang!

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          1. Everything else he has owned is GM (and when someone practically gifts you a car it doesn’t really count.) :-)

          2. Given the mechanical issues he’s had over the years and now the interior of his Torrent which is wearing poorly even with meticulous care, it is misplaced.

  • avatar

    It’s a truck, but not the kind that you drive through a construction site pulling a massive piece of equipment and a deep, gravelly voice narrating how tough it is, not their intended market.
    It’s for the suburbanites / empty nesters etc. who buy traditional work trucks using them to putter around to the mall,schools, soccer practice, flea markets, etc., in other words too much truck.
    For them this is right up their alley.

  • avatar
    SD 328I

    The Honda ad isn’t meant to be a specific vehicle classification, but a type, in this case a “Utility” vehicle. Trucks and SUVs are often classified together as a utility/work group. They are not saying the Ridgeline is a CUV/SUV.

    That being said, the Ridgeline is probably closer in relations to a Holden Ute than a Chevy Colorado. But both can be considered “pick-ups”.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    This is an easy QPTD:

    What is the Ridgeline? Simple – it’s a pickup truck that serves the needs of perhaps 85% of all non-business truck owners. I’m looking at you, suburban cowboys!

    GM should have never dropped the Avalanche…

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    A Jack’esque Sparrow tale from the “Land of Baruthdom”;

    “Hey, man, why’d ya buy that Ram 2500?”

    “Cause I might wanna toe’d a 5th wheeler”.

    “So, ya gunna buy a 5th wheeler?”

    “One day …… maybeee.”

    “That is sure alotta truck for a maybe.”

    “Yes Sir. Its got 1000ftlb! I need it, maybe. Just buyed a new’d chainsaw”.

    “A chainsaw? WTF?”

    “Yes sir, a new’d chainsaw. I can use the truck to bring dat furwood home.”

    “A Ridgeline can do that?”

    “Yes Sir, but can a Ridgeline toe a 5th wheeler jus’in case I buyed one? If, I buyed one”.

    The man walks away from the redneck in disbelief.

    “WTF”

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The man walks away from the Australian in disbelief!

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      I live in Augusta freaking Georgia and don’t know anyone that fits your stereotype. The problem with the Ridgeline is the same as with every other midsized truck selling here. By time you price it out the “might as well” buy a full sized truck kicks in because it isn’t significantly more money to do so. i know there are urban cowboys and brodozers out there, but they are a minority, at least where I live.

      If I didn’t have a 5200 pound travel trailer and a whole load of other crap I’d have looked at it. I drove one for the heck of it when we shopped for my wife’s new car. I still would have purchased my F150. It is just so much more truck for not much more money.

  • avatar
    George B

    The Honda Ridgeline is car-based competitor to the Toyota Tacoma and Chevrolet Colorado. The Ridgeline is a better car unloaded at the expense of being less capable at hauling cargo and towing trailers. It hauls people like a CUV with the ability to occasionally haul bulky or messy stuff home from Home Depot. Mid-size pickup trucks are just small enough to easily fit with another vehicle in a typical suburban two-car garage. Full size pickup trucks are much more capable towing and hauling vehicles, but they typically get parked outside on the driveway instead of in the garage.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      I often shake my head at the so-called “two car garages” that were attached to many homes built in the early 2000s. I would classify them more as a “wide single”.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      You do know that the Ridgeline is as wide as an F150?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      My F150 fits in my garage. I do have to fold in the mirrors but I have 2 single doors versus the normal one wide door. It would be fine with that set up. I don’t put it in there because I keep my grills and lawnmowers in the second bay. I need to do a shed one day.

      For a group of folks that lament the loss of “real work trucks” and hate all the chrome and bling, this commentariat sure puts a lot of stock in said truck fitting in the garage. It is a truck. Who cares.

      Lou, I’ll give you a pass because Canada. When I lived in upstate NY I hated parking outside because I had to bring the Miata out of a coma every morning. Still, my truck fits in my 2015 era garage.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    I had a first generation Ridgeline. It wasn’t a beauty for sure but a great vehicle. Yes it had a lot of parts in common with the Pilot and Oddysey but it didn’t look like either. Even the switch gear inside was different. Now, it looks just like the Pilot inside and out. I hate it. I call it “Il Pilotino”.

  • avatar
    Rday

    My Ridgeline was whatever i wanted it to be. Great awd cuv with a bed, a pickup that would tow 5K and plenty of room to sit 5 people. I consider it to be a vehicle that has so many different applications that if one needsony one vehile….ie a vehicle to do the work of a car, a cuv or a pickup, the ridge is all of that. Miss my Ridge and the only reason I sold it was because i needed a 1 ton to pull a heavy trailer. But make no mistake, my ridge had many more features and functions that any other pickup i have seen. If i get rid of the 3500 i will have to revisit the ridgeline.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Stay tuned for tomorrow’s instalment when TTAC notices that VW Canada has a category called “SUVs and wagons”, which doesn’t include one SUV. It does include one CUV which is uncompetitive – Tiguan, one which is unavailable – Atlas, and one which is unaffordable – Toureg.

    The wagons are quite nice though!

  • avatar
    Pesky Varmint

    Yep I own pickups. A 3/4 ton and a 1 ton. I also own three ranches.

    When we go to town we drive either my Mustang or the wife’s Land Rover Discovery (don’t start on that one, I only buy them because you can get them for a song used and I have the last engine that doesn’t blow head gaskets).

    But here in Arizona there’s lots of 1/2 ton pickups in the cities, but it’s pretty much all hat and no cattle.

    The people willing to pay extra for 3/4 or 1 ton generally intend to use it.


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